frist dinner in Paris ever-cast a vote!

May 2nd, 2001, 03:47 AM
  #1  
Patti Suttle
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frist dinner in Paris ever-cast a vote!

We are "the group of 10" traveling to Paris this July (we'll be in Ireland first, then London and finally Paris). We will be staying at the Hotel Muguet in the 7th. I wanted to find a really great "typical Parisean" bistro for our first night's dinner. We wanted to stay in the 7th or as close to the hotel as possible for the first night. Nothing over $100 for two, as tasty as possible and some atmosphere too. I am thinking of these so far:
1) Le Petite Troquet
2) Le Florimond
3) Nuit de Saint Jean (have not heard what anyone has ordered there but have heard its good)
4) Thoumieux
5) L'Affriole
6) Le Bistrot de Breteuil
7) La Fontaine de Mars
8) Le Bistrot du 7eme
9) Le Bistro du Papa
There are a lot to chose from!
What's your vote? (we are all first-timers to Paris) The most important thing would be tasty food, great service and whatever you think would make our first impression of Paris a good one.
Thank you so much for any votes, advice and suggestions.
Patti
 
May 2nd, 2001, 04:50 AM
  #2  
Patti Suttle
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Oops-that's First dinner in Paris...
Patti
 
May 2nd, 2001, 05:59 AM
  #3  
s.fowler
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On the basis of reviews I've read I'd choose L'Affriole. But I'd try to make a reservation before you leave. The reason we didn't eat there is that with 7 people in our party [ we were paying] -- it seemed a bit pricier. Second would be La Fontaine de Mars [not on your list]. I have eaten there and found it delightful. We also ate at Thoumieux -- which is very classic French bistro. I just found LaFdeM more charming
 
May 2nd, 2001, 06:05 AM
  #4  
Brian in Atlanta
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I like your first choice: very French, very friendly, very delicious. However, it is a small restaurant, and a table of 10 may be difficult to arrange.

Whatever you choose, definitely reserve ahead with such a large group. Have fun.
 
May 2nd, 2001, 06:05 AM
  #5  
Gretchen
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The Florimond is wonderful and you will meet/be waited upon by Pascal, the owner, to explain the dishes. It will be an authentic Parisian dining experience and not expensive. For your group size you will need reservations, of course, and you will fill one side of this very cozy restaurant. The Bistrot du 7eme was also very good. You might want to add Le Clos des Gourmets on Av. Rapp. We did not think our meal at Thomieux was
good. We had had it recommended for cassoulet and did not think it up to par.
 
May 2nd, 2001, 06:10 AM
  #6  
s.fowler
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I had heard that about Thoumieux, but our meal was excellent. I gather the kitchen can be uneven.
 
May 2nd, 2001, 08:10 AM
  #7  
StCirq
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Florimond is certainly a great little restaurant, but it's definitely not a bistro, and 10 people will almost fill the place.
The last time I ate at Bistro de Bretheuil I was very disappointed. It was filled to the brim with a noisy group of tourbus people, and the waiters were ignoring all the other customers. Food wasn't terribly good, either, and it wasn't cheap.
La Fontaine de Mars is one of my favorites, and though it's not a bistro, it's a very old establishment and has the look and feel of a genuine Paris hangout.
The Bistro de Papa and Bistro du 7me are both classic bistros with good, solid menus and reasonable prices.
If it were my dinner, I'd choose La Fontaine de Mars and ask for a table upstairs.
 
May 2nd, 2001, 08:32 AM
  #8  
s.fowler
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I agree with StCirq. Upstairs is the way to go with a group that size. Although in the summer outside is lovely
 
May 2nd, 2001, 08:40 AM
  #9  
btilke
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I would cross the Bistrot du Papa off the list. There's nothing special about it in any way. Moreover, I've seen them seat groups and they try to cram as many people into the smallest table possible with rather brusque service. Not very comfortable. I would go with La Fontaine de Mars. Or perhaps Sancerre (not on your list). The menu at Bistrot du 7eme is rather small so not everyone may be able to find something they like, but other than that it's certainly ok. We have often eaten at the Brasserie Bosquet on the corner of rue du Champ de Mars and Ave. Bosquet, a stone's throw from your hotel. It's a mix of tourists and locals (the later you go, the more locals; the earlier, the more tourists). The menu is very "cuisine grandmere", that is all the usual suspects (roast chicken, salmon, lamb, steak tartare, rillettes, chevre chaud, tarte tatin, etc., etc.). The service has always been very good; it's quite comfortable, and very relaxing. It's not a "destination" restaurant by any means, but a good neighborhood choice. We've probably eaten there at least a dozen times and never been disappointed. Finally, it's very well ventilated, so if you have members of your group who are sensitive to smoke, that's a mark in its favor.
 
May 2nd, 2001, 08:45 AM
  #10  
s.fowler
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Ahhh. Sancerre. One of my favorite places It is a wine bar, not a bistro/restaurant and closes at 9pm I think. The menu is limited -- slads, omlettes, quiche etc... We ate there our last night. It's nice and relaxed, but I think the vote is piling in for La Fontaine de Mars. Be sure to have Ile Flotant for dessert if it is on the menu!
 
May 2nd, 2001, 12:32 PM
  #11  
lisa
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Does anyone know whether La Fontaine de Mars has a prix fixe menu for lunch and/or dinner, and if so, how much it is?
 
May 2nd, 2001, 12:45 PM
  #12  
s.fowler
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I'm sure they must. I know they do at lunch. Here is their website: http://www.parisavenue.fr/sites/lefi...o/64/index.htm
 
May 2nd, 2001, 01:13 PM
  #13  
Randall Smith
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Greetings,

The only two that I have dined at would be Thoumieux and Bistro de Breteuil. Of the two I would recomment Thoumieux is a typical Parisian "Resto", their Cassoulet is excellent, they have there own house wine with theie own labels, and the clientele is generally French and not so many tourists. It continues to be one of my favorites, the atmosphere is great. You can check it out by following the link below.

http://europe.cnn.com/2000/FOOD/news...aris.dining/#3

Bon Appetit,

Randy Smith
 
May 2nd, 2001, 03:05 PM
  #14  
wendy
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Patti,

Can we suggest another bistro not on your list, or have you chosen this list for a specific reason?

If I had to choose from this list it would be L'Affriole...

Also, when I am in Paris with a group of 9 or 10, I make a reservation (when it applies) to have a round table. The converstaion doesn't flow quite as well at a long table!
Bon Appetit!
 
May 2nd, 2001, 03:08 PM
  #15  
s.fowler
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Wendy -- I want to hear what you would recommend so post away!
 
May 2nd, 2001, 08:49 PM
  #16  
Patti Suttle
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Wendy-sure! I am totally open to ANYTHING at this point. Just really want a great experience for our first night to give us a great impression of French food.
So, post away!
Patti
 
May 3rd, 2001, 02:22 PM
  #17  
Patti Suttle
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Here's another question: what is the difference between a bistro and a restaurant? (thought I knew but now I am confused).
Also, on Nuit de Saint Jean does anyone have any specifics about it?
And, also about L'Affriole?
Thank you all so much for your time!
Patti
 
May 3rd, 2001, 04:08 PM
  #18  
Pat
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This is a great thread. I am also looking for a restaurant for my first nights in Paris (first time).
 
May 4th, 2001, 04:02 AM
  #19  
wendy
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Although the others listed may be better choices, I was thinking of adding to your list L'Oeillade on rue St. Simon and also Au Petit Tonneau, on rue Surcouf, both in the 7eme. Has anyone suggestions or comments about these?

I like L'Oeillade for its home style bistro cooking, it is popular with residents, do I like the French being spoken versus English. The food is much more handsome than the decor, but the Epaule d'Agneau Rotie Piquee a l'Ail (Roasted lamb shoulder with garlic) set on the table with white linen and fresh flowers is lovely!

Au Petit Tonneau is run by Madame Boyer, and all the dishes personally selected by her...I believe there was a post on this recently? She was taught to cook by her grandmother, and although the service is slow, who is in a hurry? The I like the Terrine de Volaille Maison (Homemade chicken/pate) and Turbot au Beurre Blanc (served with butter cream sauce with wine white and shallots) and from September to April the coquilles saint-jacques.
 
May 4th, 2001, 04:14 AM
  #20  
wendy
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Well, I can't type this morning!

I meant to say I do like the French being spoken not 'do I' ...

A bistro was originally a cafe-bar, cooking midday and evening meals...(Russians used to pound the tables with their fists and yell "BISTRO!" (Russian for quick, or fast) which is the origin of the name around 1814. The Bistro has obviously changed these days, expanding the level of service, hours and menu offerings where the line bewteen a restaurant and bistro can become a very fine line!

The origins of 'restaurant' goes back to 1765 when a Monsieur Boulanger opened the first restaurant in Paris on the rue des Poulies (near Les Halles)and hung a sign over the door in Latin which said (in English here), "Come unto me all ye whose stomachs are in labour and I shall restore thee"... the word 'restore' helping found the word 'restaurant'. Kind of hard to believe it was only 1765 when the first restaurant in Paris opened!
 

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