French Slang Words

Old Dec 29th, 2005, 03:25 PM
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French Slang Words

Are there any slang words I can use to fit in more when going to Paris.
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Old Dec 29th, 2005, 03:29 PM
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I question the value of using slang when the user does not speak the language fluently. If you spoke French fluently, you would have picked up slang words, or would know through your studies where to find them.
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Old Dec 29th, 2005, 03:33 PM
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I think you would look kind of weird using certain slang terms while not speaking the language fluently.

Imagine being in the U.S. and meeting someone that is French, could not speak any english, yet said "how's it going, dude"?

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Old Dec 29th, 2005, 04:07 PM
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do you mean swear words? merde is a handy multi-purpose one.

i agree with both posters above that you would likely just sound silly trying to use slang unless your french is extremely fluent, then you wouldn't be asking us here.

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Old Dec 29th, 2005, 04:29 PM
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LOL suze..."handy multi-purpose"
Yes, it is exactly that
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Old Dec 29th, 2005, 04:34 PM
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Unless you speak absolutely fluent French, slang words are going to sound totally ludicrous coming out of your mouth. And if you speak absolutely fluent French, you'd know them already.

I don't get what you're after here. Why would you want to know slang in French if you don't already know French?

I guess if you do speak relatively decent French and you want to sound more native, you could always interject the random "beh" or "bomba" into your sentences (especially if you wanted to sound like a lower-class person or workman), but again, without being fluent, you'd need to know WHERE to interject them.

There are books called Streetwise French you can buy for loads of slang phrases, though again I don't understand the purpose of your request.
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Old Dec 29th, 2005, 04:35 PM
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punctuating sentences with d'accor d'accor works nicely
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Old Dec 29th, 2005, 04:46 PM
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I had a young person from Italy that did not speak fluent English (to put it midly) that always concentrated on learning American slang. It was too funny.

He is now a mature man and has a good job in the financial sector in Italy. His English is now perfect. I notice he no longer worries about learning American slang.

And perhaps some do not agree but to me there is a difference between slang and swear words. Neither make a big impression IMO.

I just wish I could speak enough decent French to "get by" LOL.
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Old Dec 29th, 2005, 04:51 PM
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That would be d'accord, not that the spelling makes much difference if it were spoken French.

But that's not slang - it just means "yes, I'm in agreement," or "yeah, right." It's not slang slang like "Y s'est fait marron par l'singe."
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Old Dec 29th, 2005, 04:59 PM
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Why?
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Old Dec 29th, 2005, 05:10 PM
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I'll give you one: "super" - - it means "great".

Pronounced to rhyme with "tu père", not a rhyme with the verb "buvez".

Super best wishes,

Rex
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Old Dec 29th, 2005, 05:33 PM
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I for one am always wishing I knew more slang, not so I could use it but so I could understand it. Listening to song lyrics, reading books and magazines. I always feel like I'm missing something.
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Old Dec 29th, 2005, 09:41 PM
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If you have to ask which words to use, you shouldn't be using them. Nothing sounds worse in any language than a non-native speaker trying to "fit in" through the use of slang. Not only will you use the wrong words in the wrong places in the wrong situations, but your accent will be extremely irritating when used in combination with slang.

Personally, I don't even use slang in my own native language, much less in other languages. If I have to use slang to gain acceptance, I'm spending time with the wrong crowd.
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Old Dec 29th, 2005, 10:24 PM
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st. Cirq -

I consider myself pretty fluent, but have to admit, you got me on that one...

-Kevin
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Old Dec 29th, 2005, 10:36 PM
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lol, kevin, all I know is that a monkey was involved
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Old Dec 30th, 2005, 12:26 AM
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For people who do feel confident enough to follow this up (and you would need good French to begin with), I recommend two books by an author who simply calls herself Geneviève - "Merde!" and "Merde Encore!". They may be out of print, but they were published by Angus and Robertson, and the ISBNs are 0207149100 and 0207152721.

A French guide which gives both literal and useful translations of common French phrases is "Sky my husband! Ciel mon mari!", from Editions Seuil, ISBN 2020094851. The monkey and the chestnut isn't there; my guess is it might be something to do either with wasted effort or being given the brush-off (guessing what a monkey's reaction might be to biting into a chestnut).
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Old Dec 30th, 2005, 04:03 AM
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Not a word but a phrase – “les singes fromage mangent et toujours surrenderant” would always go down well.

In all seriousness avoid slang because it is culturally loaded. Sarkozy – the French politician - is in all sorts of trouble as he referred to the recent rioters as “racilles”. This is usually taken to mean rabble or ragamuffins, but it can, depending on context mean scum.

The same is true of a word like “beur” which is a term that the young arabs have taken to designating themselves as. When used by an arab, it is inoffensive, when used by a non-arab it can be very offensive indeed (it’s similar to the rappers use of the word “n*****r” in the USA)
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Old Dec 30th, 2005, 04:28 AM
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Hi BB,

>Are there any slang words I can use to fit in more when going to Paris[?]

No. You will just be laughed at.

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Old Dec 30th, 2005, 06:14 AM
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PatrickLondon, thanks, I've ordered "Sky my husband" from Amazon and am looking forward to seeing whether it clears up any confusion for me.
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Old Dec 30th, 2005, 06:35 AM
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<“les singes fromage mangent et toujours surrenderant” > is it supposed to mean something????
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