French pronunciation, please

Old Apr 21st, 2000, 12:16 PM
  #1  
Diane
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French pronunciation, please

How is l'additon pronounced?
 
Old Apr 21st, 2000, 12:28 PM
  #2  
Rex
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lah-deece-yoh

The first syllable is simple and straight-forward.

The second rhymes with Greece.

The third syllable is the one most difficult to represent in written English.

It rhymes vaguely with Homer simpson's "Doh", but with just a hint more "n" - - yet not ever actually pronouncing the "n".
 
Old Apr 21st, 2000, 12:32 PM
  #3  
elaine
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At the end of a meal you can also ask
for "la note" ("la nut" sort of) which may be easier
 
Old Apr 21st, 2000, 12:36 PM
  #4  
Patrick
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Thanks a lot, Rex. I had hoped I would never have to watch the Simpson's, but thanks to you, now I just may have to do that. I knew being addicted to this site would cause problems!!! The one thing you didn't mention however, is that the last syllable is the most accented one, at least if I'm saying it right.
 
Old Apr 21st, 2000, 01:53 PM
  #5  
Ed
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Roughly, law-diss-YOWN

Ed
 
Old Apr 21st, 2000, 02:07 PM
  #6  
Richard
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Diane, Scroll down the opening page of this site and you will see a box marked "language". Click on it and it will go to a page for French, German etc. Go to the "dining out" page, scroll to the bottom and l'addition is phonetically shown, and if you click on it it will be verbalized.
 
Old Apr 21st, 2000, 04:07 PM
  #7  
Diane
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Thank you all, especially Richard. I had no idea Fodors had translations.
 
Old Apr 24th, 2000, 12:06 PM
  #8  
lynne
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la-dish-shon is close to it...they'll know what you mean.
 
Old Apr 25th, 2000, 02:21 PM
  #9  
elvira
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Pinch your right for finger against your thumb, like you were picking up a straight pin. Open your left palm and make a writing motion with your pinched fingers whilst (heh heh had to get that in there) saying "l'addition, s'il vous plait" and smiling nicely. Oh yeah say it very quietly (we Americans tend to boom).
 
Old Apr 25th, 2000, 10:22 PM
  #10  
Christine
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Lynne is right-
l'addition s'il vous plait.

lay-dish-yawn sil vu play
 
Old Apr 26th, 2000, 04:43 AM
  #11  
dan woodlief
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You still may not be sure of some of the verb sounds with so many variations above. The "a" is like in "la la la." Rex was right on with the middle part. The "i" is pronounced like the long e in English. The last part is the hardest. It is like "yon" with a long o sound, as in "so," however the n is swallowed to the point of almost not being pronounced. From my own experience, non of the three syllables are emphasized that much more than any other. If you want to get a good idea of French pronunciation, there are websites that you can use if you have speakers. Unfortunately, I can't recall any addresses right now. Also, see if your local library has any "Vocabulearn" tapes. They are all vocabulary, progressing from words to phrases.
 
Old Apr 26th, 2000, 04:50 AM
  #12  
Rex
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Thank you Dan,

With the recent charges of elitism, I have been reluctant to come back here and defend myself. But you have given me the renewed backbone to come on here and say tsk, tsk, tsk.

There is NO word in French - - dare I say - - not even ONE syllable within ANY word in French that reminds with the English words kiss nor dish.

not la diss yoh
nor la dish yoh
la deece yoh.

Trust me.
 
Old Apr 26th, 2000, 07:51 AM
  #13  
Caitlin
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Rex is right: lah deece yoh, with even stress.

Sil vous plait is not "sill vu play" but sea(l) voo play; the first word is somewhere between sea and seal, but err towards sea--you do not want a hard "l". Even stress on each word, basically.

And try to swallow the "r" in merci; there are no hard r's in French. There is slightly more stress on the first syllable, and the second is drawn out just a bit: mehr see.

 
Old Apr 26th, 2000, 08:46 AM
  #14  
Joe
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Hi Diane,
I suggest that you have a good time, use French as much as you can, and not obsess about the pronunciation. Many French waiters have a sense of humour and are fun to practice your French with, and what can you do about the ones who don't? I've been to France 5 times, enjoyed each trip, and used my limited but growing knowledge of the language freely. I originally took college French in southern Ohio, and it shows. I'll never, ever pass for a native speaker, but I've found the French to be friendly and helpful to Americans who make an effort. Joe
 

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