Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

Franco's favourite ... Roman food & restaurants

Franco's favourite ... Roman food & restaurants

Old Jul 10th, 2007, 12:52 PM
  #101  
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,827
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
bm
TRSW is offline  
Old Jul 23rd, 2007, 06:17 PM
  #102  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 5,741
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
franco and ek,

I'll search the site, but specifically looking for those famous fried artichokes and risotto...risotto w just parm/risotto with fungi/risotti w asparagus.mmmm. I also heard some good things about fried rice balls? We will be in Rome, Florence and Venice. Any hints on which city/restaurant I can find the best of these personal culinary faves?

Thanks...
Paula
sarge56 is offline  
Old Jul 23rd, 2007, 08:13 PM
  #103  
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 148
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
bookmarking
AmanteDelLimoncello is offline  
Old Jul 23rd, 2007, 09:11 PM
  #104  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 161
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
bkmkg
thank you
lovesroses is offline  
Old Jul 24th, 2007, 10:29 AM
  #105  
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 794
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Paula,
You'll find the famous fried artichokes all over Rome. The Jewish Ghetto restaurants are especially known for them. I had an amazingly delicous fried artichoke at Popi-Popi in Trastevere (as well as fantastic pizza and the best tiramisu ever!)

The fried rice balls (called suppli) are also found in many restaurants with classic Roman menus. My notes reccommend Checco er Carrettiere, in Trastevere, Via Benedetta 10/13 06 5800985 "Don't miss the carciofi alla romana (in season, of course). The supplì are outstanding, made with carnaroli rice and the sauce from the involtini, ossobuco, and coda alla vaccinara." This restaurnt is a bit on the expensive side, and I imagine you can get decent suppli elsewhere for less money, but the whole meal here should be great.

Risotto is best in Venice. We had the most amazng asparagus risotto at Riviera (Tel: 041-522-7621, Fondamenta Zattere Ponte Lungo – 1473)a fantastic restaurant right on the Giudecca canal in Dorsoduro. Not cheap but well worth it.

If you're interested, my Italy trip report has a ton of food descriptions/restaurant reviews in Rome/Florence/Venice with addresses, phone numbers and prices for meals. Just click my name and look for "Donkey" in the title.

Enjoy!
plafield is offline  
Old Jul 24th, 2007, 10:41 AM
  #106  
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 154
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Having just returned from Rome this weekend, I can tell you that artichokes are not in season now, and the better restaurants are not serving any. We had lunch in the Ghetto and the first thing I asked for was an artichoke, having had them in the spring a few years ago. We were advised that they are not available and if a restaurant has them beware!
dorie is offline  
Old Jul 24th, 2007, 10:45 AM
  #107  
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 2,453
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I would not insist on an asparagus risotto. Cooking in Italy is very much a seasonal thing; if asparagus is not in season, no one will have asparagus risotto on the menu - or if they do, they shouldn't.
Zerlina is offline  
Old Jul 24th, 2007, 12:30 PM
  #108  
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 794
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I agree about the seasonal choices. We were lucky enough to be there in the spring when both asparagus and artichokes were in season! But suppli and plain risotto with fine cheese and/or other lovely seasonal vegetables will be available, as well as many other delicious Italain specialities.
plafield is offline  
Old Jul 24th, 2007, 12:42 PM
  #109  
LJ
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,759
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Cooking is such a regional thing in Italy: those rice balls you are talking about would probably be called aranci, (like oranges) in Florence and would likely be stuffed with fresh mozzarella.
LJ is offline  
Old Jul 24th, 2007, 12:58 PM
  #110  
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 2,453
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Arancini (the diminutive is always used, even though they are anything but small) are actually a Sicilian dish. There they come with various fillings, the most common being ham and bechamel or tomato ragu, cheese and peas.
Zerlina is offline  
Old Jul 30th, 2007, 05:14 PM
  #111  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 2,355
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Sorry for being late at the party... Paula: risotto agli asparagi is a Venetian specialty, but as the others said, the asparagus is just over, and it is absolutely impossible to get any serious Italian cook to prepare anything out of season. Risotto ai funghi or al parmigiano are no regional specialties anywhere, and while mushroom risotto can be found here and there all over northern Italy, I've never heard of risotto with parmesan only. Generally, northern Italy is risotto country, the south is not - and yet, as Zerlina said, arancini di riso (aka supplì al telefono!) are a Sicilian, and today also a Roman specialty. I must admit, though, that I don't recall any Roman restaurant where they were memorable... it's typically a preparation to make use of the leftovers of yesterday's risotto, so I usually prepare them myself at home! It's easy - any good risotto can be used, adding an egg to the risotto, a spoon of tomato sauce if you feel like, and some mozzarella and/or ham at the center of each arancino (or also boiled peas), coat the arancini with more egg and breadcrumbs (like a Wiener Schnitzel) and fry in olive oil.
As far as fried artichokes, see above: the season is from November to April/May. The best I had in Rome was at Sora Margherita, Piazza delle Cinque Scuole 30 (in the Ghetto, of course) - a place that I DON'T otherwise recommend, extremely uncomfortable, and a terribly unfriendly service to boot. But the fried artichoke was memorable...
franco is offline  
Old Jul 30th, 2007, 10:19 PM
  #112  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 5,741
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
franco, you say the season for artichokes starts in November. Think there's a chance we can find some around the 23rd of October when we're there?
sarge56 is offline  
Old Jul 31st, 2007, 04:30 AM
  #113  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 2,355
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
sarge, in theory, I'd say no (second half of November is rather when they're arriving). But on the other hand, I seem to remember that I actually had good artichokes myself in Rome in October... or is my memory mistaken?
franco is offline  
Old Jul 31st, 2007, 08:06 AM
  #114  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 3,500
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
bookmarking for my trip planning. Thanks franco!
TexasAggie is offline  
Old Jul 31st, 2007, 10:55 AM
  #115  
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 2,336
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
bookmark - thanks again, franco
smetz is offline  
Old Aug 10th, 2007, 11:41 AM
  #116  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 92
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Great stuff. Thanks!
Marit77 is offline  
Old Aug 11th, 2007, 02:53 PM
  #117  
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Great info for our trip.
Glencoe is offline  
Old Aug 12th, 2007, 12:06 AM
  #118  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 11
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks Franco for you advice. My sister & I will be traveling to Rome in October to visit a niece who will be there for a semester. We are gathering up all the information we can and this certainly has helped. Thank you, Janice.
janrantoo2 is offline  
Old Aug 12th, 2007, 12:45 AM
  #119  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 11
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I've noticed that many postings are commenting that the meal price included a 1/2 to a full liter of wine. I know a collective gasp will be heard throughout the universe, but I don't like wine. To my unappreciative palate, it tastes like turpentine. My sister can appreciate wine, but I prefer an ice cold beer while on vacation but will settle for water or lemonade. The website for Checchino's seemed like it only referred to the wine cellar. Do restaurants have a full bar? Thanks Janice
janrantoo2 is offline  
Old Aug 12th, 2007, 10:48 AM
  #120  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 2,355
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
A full bar, no. They have wine (as you know), and mineral water, that's what Italians usually drink; and it won't certainly be a problem to get a cold beer. Lemonade, however, is inconceivable in a good Italian restaurant.
franco is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Manage Preferences Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Your Privacy Choices -