European Identity

Apr 3rd, 2002, 05:27 AM
  #1  
john
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European Identity

I was wondering for any Europeans out there, do you see yourself as Europeans or mainly German, French...? How do you feel about Europe becoming one country?
 
Apr 3rd, 2002, 05:32 AM
  #2  
Sjoerd
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Europe is not becoming "one country". The differences in culture, language are too big. However, a European identity is developing, helped by a common currency, no more border checks, and in general lots of official and private contacts between Europeans. I feel Dutch AND European. We, as Europeans, have much more in common than things that separate us.
 
Apr 3rd, 2002, 05:58 AM
  #3  
hans
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I agree with Sjoerd. Being from Munich, I consider myself to very much be not only German but Bavarian. At the same time, studying in the U.S., I have realized that internationally I am a European ( or Euro as my North American friends say). In Europe we see our differences but when we leave the continent, the French, Danes and Greeks are my countrymen.
 
Apr 3rd, 2002, 06:17 AM
  #4  
elina
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Europe certainly is not becoming one country. Not even trying to. In fact European Union encourages and finances projects that enhance and preserve national cultures and languages. We understand that cultural diversity is wealth. But European identity is developing as a result of EU and common currency.

I am first Finnish, second European. I have a Spanish friend who says that he is first Andalucian, second Spanish and third European.
 
Apr 3rd, 2002, 06:26 AM
  #5  
sylvia
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I can remember putting in my books at school my address followed by England, Great Britain, Europe, the World, the Universe.
I certainly felt very European when I lived in the US for a bit, but I also felt great affinity with other Commonwealth citizens.
 
Apr 3rd, 2002, 06:28 AM
  #6  
Sheila
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I'm Scottish, first and European second.

That's true for most of us I'm sure. No-one here thinks of Europe as just one country
 
Apr 3rd, 2002, 07:07 AM
  #7  
mpprh
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Hi

I've been living and travelling in Europe for 20 years.

I've lived in UK, Sweden, Belgium and France. I'm married to a Francaise.

I'll always be British, my passport tells me that. But I feel comfortable in most of Europe.

I'd say I am becoming a European first and Brit second. This is the case for a growing number of ex pats in Europe, who move for job reasons.

Of course I still miss the English pubs, but not the weather and "little islander" mentality

Peter
 
Apr 3rd, 2002, 08:02 AM
  #8  
Myriam
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I'm first Flemish, than Belgian and European (without distinction). Although most of the borders have disappeared, the difference between our various countries remains and will remain. If you start in, say, Belgium and you travel 2000 km further south you're in a different culture. That's what makes Europe an interesting continent, IMHO.
 
Apr 5th, 2002, 06:18 AM
  #9  
manny
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I agree with what most people are saying. Europe will not be a "United States of Europe." We will be something more in the lines of Canada, with different cultures living and working together in peace.
 
Apr 5th, 2002, 07:14 AM
  #10  
Tony Hughes
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A Scotsman. Not British or European. really.
 
Apr 5th, 2002, 07:28 AM
  #11  
k
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Would this not be the same as in the US where one might be a New Yorker and an American? Or a Californian and an American? then I would expect a person living in London to feel English and European.
 
Apr 5th, 2002, 07:38 AM
  #12  
Phil
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Finally a thread where everyone agrees. Wonderful.
Europe is more of a "cocktail"
than a mix (as in "blender"). However, 'always' is a relative notion. One day we'll probably all be just as mixed (dare I add 'up'?) as North America.
 
Apr 5th, 2002, 07:53 AM
  #13  
xxx
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Do Americans prefer to be called Brazilian, Peruvian, Argentinian or do you see yourselves as just American
 
Apr 5th, 2002, 08:40 AM
  #14  
xxx
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The previous xxx hit it to the point. Europe is not a country.

In Europe people speak 50+ (something like that) languages as their native tongues. There are multiple very alive, very different cultures, ancient national epics, as many histories as countries and nations, national literatures and arts, every country has it´s own typical foods and ways of life... Plus let´s remember: European countries are sovereign, independent states. EU and euro are means to stabilize economies and facilitate people´s living, working and studying in different countries. It is also a great way to tie ancient enemies together – for once in something beneficial.

So far the greatest thing about European integration has been the way students move from university to university from one country to another. I wish it would have been so easdy 30 years ago. I studied years in France, but it took a lot of red tape before I could do that.
 
Apr 5th, 2002, 09:29 AM
  #15  
Clapton
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I'm a US American first. I could move to any state and I would still say I'm a American that lives in New York state or whatever. Thats the difference I think in Europeans and US Americans.
 
Apr 5th, 2002, 09:43 AM
  #16  
Kavey
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I think of myself as British first but also as a European.

I think people in the UK were slow to think of themselves as European (even after their first nationality) but it's starting to change now and many people I know consider themselves European too.

But I don't think of myself as English, though I was born here, since my parents came from India. My passport and nationality are British, not English so I don't FEEL english, I feel British and European.

I never would say Indian-British as Indian to me is my race or ethnic background and not part of my national identity.

Kavey
 
Apr 5th, 2002, 10:03 AM
  #17  
American
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I am a New Yorker, and an American.
My neighbor is English and a New Yorker.
Another neighbor is Japanese, and a New Yorker.
Another calls himself an Afro/American, another is a Native American.
It gets a little muddled doesn't it?
 
Apr 5th, 2002, 10:51 AM
  #18  
lisboa
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I'm alfacinha first ( little letuce )..sounds strange ??? that's how someone that was born in Lisbon is called !!!.But I am a Portuguese, and and an european. But above all I consider myself as a citizen of the world.
 
Apr 5th, 2002, 12:10 PM
  #19  
Florence
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I don't believe (and don't want) Europe will ever become one country. Some kind of federation of independent states would be nice, like in Switzerland where each canton keeps its local customs, police, laws, flavors, tastes, languages, cultural particularities ...
 
Apr 5th, 2002, 12:50 PM
  #20  
Spider
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I'm an earthling.
 

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