Europe Going "Bio" Manic

Feb 25th, 2008, 11:58 AM
  #1  
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Europe Going "Bio" Manic

Though i had realized Europeans were perhaps more fussy with the quality of their food - especially fruits and vegetables - and disdained things like genetically manipulated crops, etc. i had never seen so much hype about Bio this and Bio that everywhere i went

Bio is the word it seems on the Continent for Organic.

From my first breakfast at the old convent i was staying in in Amsterdam where the owner proudly pointed out all foods were bio - and their labels proved this.

Then in stores the signs Bio hanging everywhere

So if you're an organic food freak Europe has gone Bio
PalenQ is offline  
Feb 25th, 2008, 12:28 PM
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Oh yes, we definitely have gone bio.

I try to only buy locally grown meat too. (I don't trust those Czech and Chinese chickens.)

A grocery chain store is even considering labeling all airplane transported goods with "by air."



kleeblatt is offline  
Feb 25th, 2008, 12:31 PM
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How about those Chilean or whatever S American country and the Swiss wurst problem - has this been solved? Just curious
PalenQ is offline  
Feb 25th, 2008, 12:37 PM
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Just had a cervelat yesterday. Still available on the market with no change in form, taste or price.

Don't know what the future holds though.

See... the EU doesn't trust South American intestines either. Goes with the whole bio thinking.

kleeblatt is offline  
Feb 25th, 2008, 12:37 PM
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Of course, we always make an exception for wines from Chile and Argentina.
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Feb 25th, 2008, 12:54 PM
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Big shift in my part of the US as well to organic. 2 yrs ago the only place to get organic goods was either Whole Foods or small local specialty store. Now 2 major local chains both claim to have 3000+ organic products on their shelves, including store brands for just about everything, meats, dairy, etc. Prices have dropped greatly as well.
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Feb 25th, 2008, 01:03 PM
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There was a thing on the French news last night.

The farmers want GM, as it saves them money, and Governments are bowing to farm lobby pressure.

On the other hand:

The consumer doesn't want to touch it, and sabotage of GM crops is now so frequent that insurers won't touch them either.

American exporters are crying "foul" as European countries want GM products labelled as such.

American beef is still classified as toxic industrial waste in Europe.
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Feb 25th, 2008, 01:06 PM
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I am lucky enough to have good "biologische" farm close by that has a shop. I buy most of my vegetables,egges and cheese there and meat when they have it - it comes from their own animals so is not a regular thing.
Where my son lives in Friesland he has a farm that has a Biologishce supermarket. Wonderful. And the milk he can get there is just heavenly. I don't normally drink milk but that is just so wonderful, takes me back to being a kid!
hetismij is offline  
Feb 25th, 2008, 01:10 PM
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"American beef is still classified as toxic industrial waste in Europe."

Apparently, Europeans don't know (or more likely, don't want to know) that there are many producers of hormone-free, additive-free, grassfed beef in the U.S.
example: http://www.grasslandbeef.com/
BTilke is offline  
Feb 25th, 2008, 01:17 PM
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In terms of genetically modifed food, I want it labelled as such. That allows me to make the choice whether to eat it or not.

I have a problem with concepts like Monsanto's roundup resistant maize, in that I don't like the model of having to buy new seed every year. I was also disturbed by earlier stories of Canadian farmers having their non GM crops seized because it had become contaminated by the neighbours crop.
willit is offline  
Feb 25th, 2008, 01:20 PM
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I confess that I rarely buy 'bio' products, since I have enough faith in the normal French or European products.

However, if ever the rules are watered down again, I will make more of point of buying only the products that conform to my idea of what agriculture should be, even if it is more expensive.

I'm glad to learn that there is some non-hormone beef available in the U.S. I'm sure it will be approved for sale in Europe if other rules are fully applied.
kerouac is online now  
Feb 25th, 2008, 01:25 PM
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"Apparently, Europeans don't know (or more likely, don't want to know) that there are many producers of hormone-free, additive-free, grassfed beef in the U.S."

And I bet it's marvelous...

Was once invited to a breakfast party at a bio restaurant, and went reluctantly expecting home woven yoghurt, cold nettle soup and mung bean sprouts.

Organic bacon, sausage, eggs, black pudding...the works. Bloody delicious!

If your Grandmother ever told you that food doesn't have any taste these days, she was telling the gods' honest truth.
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Feb 25th, 2008, 01:26 PM
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<<< Apparently, Europeans don't know (or more likely, don't want to know) that there are many producers of hormone-free, additive-free, grassfed beef in the U.S. >>>

I think the problem is that compared to the hormone pumped industrial effluent that passes for beef in the US, the hormone-free etc stuff is a very small %age of total production - and most of that would be sold within the US.

Besides we have plenty of such stuff in Yorp so why should we have to import it
alanRow is offline  
Feb 25th, 2008, 01:31 PM
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So alan are you saying the Europeans just don't know how to cook beef -- particularly steaks? After a full summer in Europe the first thing I crave when I get home to the US is a really good steak -- I have yet to find it in Europe. What's more our steakhouses seem to be the first place many European travelers head to when they get to the US.
NeoPatrick is offline  
Feb 25th, 2008, 01:34 PM
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Just because food tastes nice, doesn't mean it;s good.
alanRow is offline  
Feb 25th, 2008, 01:50 PM
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The hormones and other chemicals make that U.S. beef tender; that's one of the reasons that such things have been done to meat. If Americans want to eat that stuff, that's fine with me. Just don't try to get me to eat it.
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Feb 25th, 2008, 02:00 PM
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Beef isn't "tough" for lack of hormones or other additives,. Kerouac. You can "bio" your cow all you want but a tough cut of meat is a TOUGH cut of meat.

As to whether or not something like sausage is "better" for you becaause it is "bio"...hmmm.ask your coronary arteries about that one.
Dukey is offline  
Feb 25th, 2008, 03:21 PM
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I read in Pollen's Omnivore's Dilemma that corn-fed beef actually is higher in saturated fat--the flesh is more marbled. But it's from the corn diet, not hormones, etc.

So if grass-fed beef is less marbled, doesn't it make sense it's better for you than corn-fed?

christycruz is offline  
Feb 25th, 2008, 04:38 PM
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I just hope that with all their concern regarding 'bio' foods, Europe is more stringent about what is classified as such than we are here in the US. Terms such as 'free-range' and even the USDA endorsed 'organic' label have thousands of shades of gray, so the consumer may really not be getting what they think they are.

For the record, I'm not a huge supporter of the whole organic movement. I believe people should have the choice to buy it if they like, but the move towards many major grocery stores sell it is eventually going to drive many producers out of business. You may think that is a good thing, until you end up paying $10/pound for chicken because the supply is so low. Besides, GM products may not taste as good, but they are not bad for you. Research from numerous university programs (Iowa State, Texas Tech, Texas A&M, UC Davis, etc) has found that the 'harmful' effects of such products are non-existent. As pp mentioned, there are health differences from corn vs grass fed, but that is about it.

Sorry for the soapbox- I'm studying animal science, and this is an issue that is of major importance to the production industry right now. *steps off soapbox*
copper675 is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 01:43 AM
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Nope, basically food labelling is a bit of a mess, and food advertising even more so. There are, I believe, competing certification schemes for "organic" status in the UK, and I don't imagine it's any different elsewhere in the EU: it's all too easy for the well-organised and well-financed to get in first to the people who might (if anyone ever is) be tasked with developing statutory schemes.
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