Eating in Spain

Jul 1st, 2012, 02:20 AM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
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Patatas bravas with a dicy throat? Probably not.
Ackislander is offline  
Jul 1st, 2012, 03:59 AM
  #22  
 
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As many have noted there is a variety of foods. Some of the following are repeats.

As also noted above there are different sizes at tapas bars and they are called tapas, pinxtos, and raciones. I will leave the argument as to the differences to the Spaniards and the purists, but for the sake of this discussion raciones are larger but still much smaller than a meal.

The ubiquitous tortilla espanola is but eggs, potatoes, and onions. The potatoes are cut thin and you can cut as small pieces as you wish. This can be found all times of the day.

TAPAS
As tapas bars you get plates of mushrooms- champiñones.
Meatballs are chopped finely-albóndigas
Croquettes -Croqetta-they come in many varieties, but they are easy to eat.
Olives-aceitunas
Tuna-atún (as a tapa will appear as the chuck type)
Fish and shell fish come in many varietes
There are various cheeses-tetilla is among the softest.
And patatas bravas (also patacas bravas) are deep fried little chuncks of potato with a hot sauce, so that might not be the best.

For main courses there is flat fish which
Hake has the unfortunate of name of rape RAP-a(hard a)
Aduchamp1 is offline  
Jul 1st, 2012, 06:20 AM
  #23  
 
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Trying to think of items with a very smooth, soft consistency:

As I recall, scrambled eggs (revuelto) are often on menus; usually with a variety of things in them, or even plain. Looking at some menus from our trip, I even saw scrambled eggs with foie gras

We found that tapas in Madrid were more commonly served on toast or bread, so just check that as you look at menus, as you'd problems with the bread.

I'm not sure about patatas bravas or torta Espagnol; the potatos in them may not be soft enough - but you could order a portion and see. Croquettes, the fried outside might not work for you, but again, give it a try.

Berengenas (sometimes spelled in slightly different ways) are eggplant, fried and served with honey. They were delicious! The eggplant were very soft, but again, the fried outside may be not soft enough for you; I recall some that were very soft (partly due to the honey soaking through), and some that were less so.

Bacalao is salted cod, reconstituted and cooked and usually served all mashed up. I've had it before, in Spain and Italy, a little bland, but it may work very well for you and is definitely a dish you won't see in North America.

And foie gras is often seen on menus - that texture may work!

Do not hesitate to go - you deserve such a wonderful experience, and even if you can't eat all that you used to, you'll find plenty to eat, and plenty of local Spanish dishes to eat! And we did find many places offered tapas-sized dishes, even in places that billed themselves as restaurants. Our 12yo daughter doesn't eat a huge amount, and the ability to choose different sizes of dishes was especially nice for her.
Lexma90 is offline  
Jul 1st, 2012, 06:30 AM
  #24  
 
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-pisto.. a tomato based dish of fried vegetables until they are mushy
-hummus is found many places

-puré de patata.. mashed potatoes
lincasanova is offline  
Jul 1st, 2012, 06:36 AM
  #25  
 
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"Bacalao is salted cod, reconstituted and cooked and usually served all mashed up. I've had it before, in Spain and Italy, a little bland, but it may work very well for you and is definitely a dish you won't see in North America."

Well, you will see it wherever there are people of Portugese, Italian, or French descent. We have a lot of those in New England, fortunately for those of us who love bacalao. In Richmond, VA, we find it in Hispanic groceries.

I wish I had thought of croquetas, since many of them have centers that are very nearly liquid. Yum.
Ackislander is offline  
Jul 1st, 2012, 07:00 AM
  #26  
 
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You have some good suggestions here. I think your best bests are going to be the soups, tortilla, and flan.

I have some general advice based my own experience with an eating challenge. A couple of weeks before a trip to Italy, I injured my jaw. I could not chew anything, so my restrictions were a bit similar to yours - no bread, pasta, meat, etc. I know I missed out on some wonderful food, but the trip was fantastic and I was very glad I went. I ordered soups and fish (sole) mostly and ate what I could in restaurants. Several times, I ended up getting food that I just could not eat. I was concerned about seeming rude for leaving so much on my plate, so I figured out how to say it was good but that I had a sore jaw. I had yogurt and a jar of peanut butter in the room in case I was still hungry.

Good for you for getting back to travel. I am sure you will have a wonderful time. Please post a report when you get back and let us know.
AnaBelen is offline  
Jul 9th, 2012, 03:36 PM
  #27  
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Thank you all so much for your helpful and encouraging replies. I am getting more enthusiastic about this each day!! And less fearful because of you!
Mybellarose is offline  
Jul 9th, 2012, 07:47 PM
  #28  
 
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I am planning a 2 week trip to Span. I speak Span. I would love to rent a villa, et, Does anyone have any exp on this? ANy tips on Granada, Cordoba, Toledo, Madrid, Barc. would be apped. Thks
chimel07 is offline  
Jul 9th, 2012, 08:10 PM
  #29  
 
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We found omelets on many menus in Spain.
crckwc1 is offline  
Jul 10th, 2012, 02:00 AM
  #30  
 
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Mybellarose,

First of all, you're awesome because you are persuing your interest despite some challenges!

Secondly, as a worst case, how about stocking your hotel room with flavored yogurts, cheese, ready-to-eat potato mash packs, tetra-pack single-serving tropicana kind of juices, etc bought from local supermarkets? Or, ordering only sides (grilled veggies / potato mash) in restaurants? This should solve your portion size as well as food type constraints. Further, you could have a lot of milkshakes, smoothies in the smaller cafes. Out of all the wonderful suggestions shared above, I loved the idea of Gazpacho!

I do not have any health constraint, but I am a vegetarian. While my issue is miniscual in front of yours. But, I too plan to visit the supermarkets often to stock up on basic items.

When are you going? I could give you more feedback once am back in September first week this year.
rtwin80days is offline  
Jul 10th, 2012, 05:18 PM
  #31  
 
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chime107
I think you'll get more response if you post this as a new topic.
crckwc1 is offline  
Jul 12th, 2012, 07:12 AM
  #32  
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Thanks to all of you. I'm making a list to take with me with translations to Spanish!

rtwin80days, I am leaving September 10 and returning September 28.

Thanks for the advice, crckwc1.
Mybellarose is offline  
Jul 12th, 2012, 07:35 AM
  #33  
 
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cheese, ready-to-eat potato mash packs, tetra-pack single-serving tropicana kind of juices, etc bought from local supermarkets?
____
I think others have mentioned this but please note that there are very few American style supermarkets within cities and another difference is that all sorts of foods are available in department stores such as Corte Inglés. And in Madrid and Barcelona there are a few locations.
Aduchamp1 is offline  

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