Da Vinci Code...question

Old Jun 12th, 2005, 02:01 PM
  #81  
 
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"I think when we read for leisure in our society today we just want something to be fun."

Please speak for yourself, ilove tulips. Rather than finding excruciatingly bad, laughably clumsy writers who concoct silly plots and populate them with cardboard characters "fun", many readers find them tedious and irritating. Believe it or not, good writers are not a chore to read, and they're actually read "for leisure".
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Old Jul 10th, 2005, 02:08 PM
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It's pretty sad when a writer can steal so much information from others, almost get sued, completely misrepresent christian history (not to mention his interpretation of arius and arianism) and still manage to pull it all off with millions. Sadder still that people believe this guy, over 4,000 years of scholastics and some of the most intelligent human being ever. Completely amazing. No offense, but Dan Brown get a clue.
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Old Jul 10th, 2005, 02:36 PM
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Colorado17,

Since my religion is good writing, that must explain why I thought "The Da Vinci Code" was such an extremely bad book.
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Old Jul 10th, 2005, 06:24 PM
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Wanderlust5 you are not alone! And don't bother with Angels and Demons, it is not worthy it.
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Old Jul 10th, 2005, 06:32 PM
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Its a great read for what it is....theres a reason why its on the best seller fiction list for almost two years now. Most books don't stay near #1 for two years......People liked it for the most part. He's creative and did some homework. If you don't buy into his stories or theories that's fine. But you can't say that he didn't make people think though. And after all thats what good writers do...make you think and entertain.....read all his books....entertaining and worth the time in my opinion.... good fiction and thats what your trying to buy in the fiction section of your bookstore after all. If it's non fiction your after and you were offended than shame on you for buying in the fiction section...........
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Old Jul 10th, 2005, 09:57 PM
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Wow! A lot of pretentious answers. If you have recently traveled to either place the books are fun and fast-paced. I found Angels and Demons to be more interesting especially because I read it after returning from Rome and visiting many of the specific places described. They came to life in the words and I could easily picture the exact sites. I also find it interesting that so many non-christians read the Da Vinci Code because of the prospects and so many christians read it to debunk the theory. I say enjoy the ride and lighten up on the criticism.

John
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Old Jul 11th, 2005, 06:53 AM
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Pretentious? More like discerning!

A couple of you above would like the following book; it was written about 30 years ago but has characterizations similar to Ian McEwan's.

The Columbus Tree, by Peter S. Feibleman

Very appropriate for Europe/Travel as it is about a Spanish coastal town turned into a tourist spot. Real characters, and not cartoon characters as in DVC. Told from viewpoints of locals, tourists, politics (police), and a teenage boy.

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Old Oct 26th, 2005, 01:39 AM
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When I started the Da Vinci Code, I thought that it was a fun little read. It was a lot like a treasure hunt game that some friends of mine and I did in college, the only difference being that our games did not take place in Paris, and hardly anyone got killed.

When I got to the end of the book, however, I was disappointed in ending. Nothing in the book seemed worth killing for. Nothing seemed worth dying for either. I found the pretext of searching for the secret chicken salad recipe in "What's up Tiger Lily?" more believable.
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Old Oct 26th, 2005, 02:09 AM
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Along the same line as John's post above, I would like to add that what some here seem to forget is that this book is FICTION, lighten up!
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Old Oct 26th, 2005, 05:53 AM
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To read the reviews of A&D is interesting. I thought it was a good book until the end. I thought Dav. Code was better but what do I know. They are great fiction books and it was fun after reading Dav. Code on the plane to Paris to go see some of the things that were written in the book. But it is purely fiction with a whiff of reality thrown in. You may only want the illustrated version if you have been to Paris but it isin't necessary.
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Old Oct 26th, 2005, 06:37 AM
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I read the non-illustrated version - no problems. Enjoyable fiction. I must admit, the book made me want to visit Paris all the more!

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Old Oct 26th, 2005, 12:53 PM
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DVC is such a silly book. (Might as well be blunt about it.) Its art historical bits are nonsense, on top of everything else. If I'm not mistaken, there's a bit where the heroine lifts "The Virgin of the Rocks" off the wall--hi, a six foot, three inch painting? She must be stroooong. And John the Evangelist is typically shown beardless and often with long hair. This isn't the only case. It's so not a woman in the Last Supper. Silliness. Brown's wife is allegedly an "art historian" but I don't think she's a real one; I'd be shocked if she were fulltime faculty anywhere. I was disappointed in the Louvre for letting the movie film there, but hey, money talks I guess.

I guess I'm a big snob. Cheers to that! ;-)
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Old Oct 26th, 2005, 01:50 PM
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So in summary - some people liked it, other did not
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Old Feb 11th, 2006, 04:06 PM
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I, too, liked A&D b/c I read it after I got back from Rome. I also love reading art history type stuff (fiction and non-fiction), and love Bernini, so I enjoyed it.

But I don't think being at the top of the best seller list indicates anything of quality. More people eat at McDonalds than at 4* restaurants. That doesn't make the food better.

So, what do you all think of John Grisham? (as if I don't already know...)
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Old Feb 11th, 2006, 04:47 PM
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Loved Karen's analogy comparing the ten list to MacDonalds...I SO agree. I finally read DVC after folks raved. As a minister, it is both my job and my passion to study theology and religious history and this is just such a bad pastiche of both. Myths that had been debunked years ago (or centuries in the case of some)and theories that have no credibility with scholars...and the writer's craft seems to elude Mr.Brown. I was frankly depressed and kept wishing that a good writer, like Carre or a P.D. James, had taken this on. If you are going to transform theology into suspense, do it well, for heaven's sake!
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Old Feb 11th, 2006, 11:17 PM
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I was surprised that someone who writes so poorly could sell so many books. After wading through DVC, with its Batman-style enigmas and character stereotypes, I've decided to give the other novels of world-renowned author Dan Brown a miss.
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Old Feb 12th, 2006, 12:49 AM
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I found I was able to read the Da Vinci Code even though the characters were, as many have said, shallow in the extreme - particularly the female character. I thought the constant male/female principle thing really boring and the ending was totally pathetic. However, I stupidly bought Angels & Demons because other people told me it was better - so wrong. The bit about stopping his fall from the helicopter by holding out his coat was ludicrous (sorry if I have spoilt that bit for anyone) and the story seemed to me to be the same as the Da Vinci Code in its essentials. Secret sect, powerful sect member/great scholar gone mad, very-bright-but-not-nearly-as-smart-as-the-guy-but-still-beautiful-in-an-unusual-and-tall-way female lead whose father/sort of father has been killed. Blah blah.

I am embarrassed to admit I read them.
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Old Feb 12th, 2006, 04:34 AM
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Thanks to the last three or four responses, I know that sweet reason lives. Embarrassment says it all. J.
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Old Feb 12th, 2006, 07:36 AM
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I've already complained about DVC earlier in the thread and here I am again. ;-) The biggest problem I have with the book is illustrated by something that happened last week: one of my students, in a discussion of the Last Supper, raised her hand and asked me about the figure that DB claims is Mary Magdalene. When I explained why it is not, the student, confused, referred to DB's preface where he makes it sound like he is working from facts and sound scholarship. Then I had to explain that DVC is fiction and is NOT fact. Therein lies the problem: too many people are reading this and thinking that there is truth to it.

I saw the preview for the upcoming movie last week. I'll be in Paris when it opens, and I can just hear the stampede of DVC fans running to find a theater with the version originale. Count me out.
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Old Feb 12th, 2006, 09:51 AM
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I don't think that DB presents it as fact. I got the impression that is was writing a work of fiction that "connects the dots" of theories, legends, etc. that gives a possible situation.

The critique of writing style makes me shake my head. Don't read it if you don't like it. I know I put plenty of books down when I don't like the author's voice. But, it is interesting reading and an interesting premise. What excellently written (according to the critics) are going unread because of DVC's stellar sales of the last three years?

As an educator, I am thrilled that such a wide cross-section of adults are reading. So many don't. I despise Danielle Steele, but I'm thrilled when someone I know who NEVER reads pick up a book for "escape" reading. Once again, different strokes for different folks.
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