Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

Czech Republic, Krakow, and a day in Frankfurt: A Solo, Budget Trip Report

Czech Republic, Krakow, and a day in Frankfurt: A Solo, Budget Trip Report

Jun 23rd, 2010, 01:36 PM
  #21  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,212
Sunday May 2

Today is the day for all things beginning with the letter M – Mucha Museum, Municipal House, and my first Prague Metro navigation:

Rain again in the night and today was overcast. The Mucha Museum was first on the itinerary. I took the tram into the center and then the subway one stop. Tram and subway tickets are in combination so you can use the same ticket and transfer within 30 minutes if you use both the tram and subway.

The Mucha Museum was small but great if you like Art Nouveau. In addition to posters, sketches, and photos there’s a film about Mucha’s life that runs 20 or 30 minutes. Normally I don’t like to sit through these museum films but this one was exceptional as you got to see his work that is not in the museum. One of the buildings that Mucha designed is the Fouquet Jewelry Shop on rue Royal in Paris.

I got lost walking to the Municipal House and stopped a gentleman walking along. The Municipal House was in his direction so he took me almost the entire way there. I bought a ticket for the 2:00 tour and then went to Old Town Square for another Greek salad (at a different café). It took a long time to get the salad, it was loaded with onions when I requested no onions, and I was told they did not serve tap water. I hurriedly ate the salad when it arrived and asked for the bill. Service not included was written boldly on the bottom of the bill and the waiter reminded me that the tip is not included. I thought asking for a tip was in pretty poor taste given the lack of service, indicated that I understood the tip was not included in the price, paid the bill and left minus the tip. I had only a few minutes to get to Municipal House for the tour.

I loved the Municipal House and thought the tour was good (access is only by guided tour). There is an additional charge of 55 CZK to take photos so I bought the photo ticket but I was so interested in the guided tour and in looking around I completely forgot to take photos until the guide reminded me that I had bought the photo ticket. I did take some photos but I didn’t think it was worth the additional money since there is little time to take photos during the tour.

After the Municipal House tour I walked around Old Town a bit as it was my last day in Prague and then returned to the pension where I fell asleep and woke up at 6:30. I realized that I had a 7:00 reservation at Kolkovna but with the rain I was reluctant to go back into town. I showered and felt refreshed and then thought about what to do for dinner. I considered not eating and waiting for breakfast but I was hungry and the snacks I had in the room would not amount to much. I remembered seeing a sign (across from my pension) for a pension called Sprint and also saw some business cards with the same name in reception. I looked it up on the internet (I was so happy I bought a Netbook for this trip) and although the web site was only in Czech, I could understand the words “sports bar” in English and the Czech word for restaurant. I got the directions and headed off to the Sprint pension, restaurant and sports bar to check it out.

It was only three blocks from my pension. When I arrived I was greeted pleasantly and indicated I would like something to eat. There were some people in the sports bar watching TV and the woman showed me into a small dining room where I was the only person eating. She fetched someone who spoke some English and he helped me choose between two dishes. My meal was pork medallions in cream sauce, French fries, and two glasses of delicious Czech wine for less than $12. The pork was very tender and the portion was large. This was a really good choice on a rainy night.
adrienne is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2010, 04:14 PM
  #22  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,212
Monday May 3

Today I could not find my way beyond the Prague airport:

I was leaving Prague this morning and the pension owner took me to the airport for 390 CZK where I picked up the rental car. Mike’s Chauffeur service, which I used from the bus station, was substantially more to the airport – 550 CZK.

My car was a Skoda, rented from Budget (booked through AutoEurope). I asked the rental fellow for directions to Kutna Hora and he handed me a map and told me to follow the signs to Brno. The rental cars are on the upper level of the parking deck and I found my car, opened the door, but could not start it up. What to do? I looked around and there was one man also picking up a car and I indicated some distress and incompetency and he understood (although I don’t think he spoke English) that I needed help starting the car. He hopped in and got it going. I think the steering wheel was locked and fortunately I never had the problem again. I did remember to ask where reverse was located before leaving the rental office.

There are three roads out of the Prague airport and none of them have clear signs to any place that looked familiar. And there were definitely no signs to Brno. I took each of the three roads in turn, returning to the airport each time to start anew with another road. After the third road which seemed to lead no place I pulled over to rethink my options. I decided to go back to the car rental office and ask which road to take.

For some reason I then flipped the map over and the reverse side gave a clearer picture of where the airport was in relation to Prague. It’s NW of Prague which means that I had to go back through Prague to get to Kutna Hora. Who knew? You’d think the rental guy would have used the reverse side and told me to go back through Prague and then follow signs to Brno.

There were no signs for Prague so I followed the signs to “Centrum” and recognized landmarks from my ride to the airport. As I drove into Prague all of a sudden I see Tram 18 which is the tram I took from my pension into town. I looked farther to the right and spotted the castle. I had come from here an hour before and now I was back again! There’s no “highway” or ring road around Prague so I had to inch my way through town and though construction and through Prague 7, where I had taken the wrong tram the other day, and out the other side of Prague before I saw a sign for Brno. I was finally on my way to Kutna Hora.

I had booked a room for two nights at Penzion U Kata (www.ukata.cz) located at the bottom of town, near where you enter from the main road. It was a bit hard to find but I kept asking people, looped around twice and found it. The restaurant is in the front; the pension in back. You enter reception from the small car park (not signed but it’s behind a tan iron gate (left open). Reception is not always open so ask in the restaurant for help. There are 1 or 2 people who speak English.

My room was quite large and the bathroom was a good size with stall shower. Plenty of wardrobe space. There’s a desk for my Netbook but half of it is taken over by the TV. There’s not much light to read by. The only light is from a ceiling fixture but only 2 of the 4 sockets have light bulbs. No hair dryer. You’re given a key to the outside reception door as it’s kept locked all the time. The restaurant is open from 11:00 to 10:00. Breakfast is from 7:00 to 10:00. The included breakfast is mostly hot and you order from a menu – bacon, eggs, sausage, etc. You can also have yogurt (plain) and they expect you to add museli to it but I passed on the museli and just ate the delicious yogurt. The rate for a single was about $25 per night.

After checking in, I walked up into town. The TI is mid-way up the hill on the right side in a building in a small square. There weren’t very many people walking around town which was rather nice since I could get photos without strangers in them. The local shops were on the lower part of the hill and there is a large Albert supermarket on the circle leading into town.

The Cathedral of St Barbara is one of Kutna Hora’s UNESCO sites. It’s at the top of the town and is open daily with a 50CZK admission charge. There is a combo ticket to the cathedral and the ossuary of 115CZK but the ticket seller at the cathedral did not mention this. I only found out the next day at the ossuary.

Baroque religious statues guide you along to St Barbara’s, an unusual looking Gothic church with its peaked roof resembling puffs of meringue topped with steeples and its surrounding flying buttresses. St Barbara is the patron saint of miners and there is a statue of her on the altar holding a book with a tower behind her. Between the ribs on the church’s ceiling are painted coats of arms representing the miners’ guilds and one back wall is devoted to mining theme frescoes. In the nave is a sculpture of a miner in a white robe with a lamp, kneeling upon black rock. The Corpus Christi Chapel at the eastern end of the cathedral is unusual because the stained glass windows are painted rather than inlaid with different colors of glass.

I ate dinner at the pension where pork in a Calvados sauce, salad, and wine cost less than $12 and was delicious.

Kutna Hora is a lovely small town with typical Czech architecture and architectural embellishments of pastel painted buildings, arches and curlicues, and corner niches with religious sculptures. It’s an hour and a half from Prague and would make a delightful day trip or a stopover enroute to other places in the Czech Republic. There’s enough sightseeing for a day.

More on Kutna Hora to come.
adrienne is offline  
Jun 23rd, 2010, 06:49 PM
  #23  
blh
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 752
Thanks so much for your report. It is very informative. We are going to Prague in October, so your report will be very helpful.
blh is offline  
Jun 24th, 2010, 02:41 PM
  #24  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,212
Tuesday May 4

Today I got lost looking for the Ossuary:

Breakfast was included with the room at U Kata. Coffee, tea, cereal, and juice were self serve. The juice looked odd like it was Tang so I skipped that. There’s a menu to choose from for cooked breakfast – all sorts of eggs, omelets, ham, sausage, bacon in different combinations. At the bottom yogurt was mentioned so that’s what I chose. I expected a small container of yogurt and wondered what flavor the waitress (who didn’t speak English) would bring. All of a sudden she brings a large dish with plain yogurt. It’s a portion in a huge bowl. I love European plain yogurt – no sugar or jam added. It has a wonderful creamy texture and mild flavor with just a tiny hint of an acetic bite. Coffee was not great – it was from a machine and not strong enough.

It’s another cool and gray day and I’m off to Sedlec to see the bone chapel. I had some silly idea that the bone chapel was out in the country so I checked my map and headed out of town. I drove to another town and saw one of those brown signs with an image of a church so I turned left down a country lane. There seemed to be nothing down here but a couple of farmers and a tractor so I consulted with them – LOL. I was advised to go back to Kutna Hora so I did.

Somehow, back in KH, I found the right road. It would have been a lot easier if I had known the Czech word for Ossuary is Kostnice. But now I know! It’s actually not too far from my pension. If you find the Albert supermarket at the circle on the main road, the ossuary is very close by. There’s street parking right near the ossuary. You can buy a combination ticket for the chapel, monastery, and St Barbara Cathedral for 115czk. I had already seen the cathedral so I bought the ossuary and monastery combo for 70czk.

The ossuary is pretty cool – lots of bones, of course. They form the chapel decoration. The most interesting is the bone chandelier, allegedly made up of every human bone. After a walk around the cemetery (lots of potted flowers on the graves) I went to the former Cistercian monastery, now a church and a UNESCO world heritage site. Exit the chapel to the left (you may need to make another left depending on which exit you take from the chapel), walk a short half block, and the church is diagonally across the street.

The Church of the Assumption of Our Lady is beautiful in its simplicity. The walls are a warm yellow with white trim and high vaulted ceilings. There are a few frescoes on the back wall and ceiling and an ornate altar, the only part of the church that is ornate. On the left side, near the altar is a spiral staircase you can ascend, cross the attic, and enter the choir loft. You need to return the same way, across the attic. There is another spiral staircase but it does not connect to the choir loft. It’s not open to the public.

Next was the Albert Supermarket to investigate Czech foods and pick up some snacks for the trip. Prices were inexpensive. A large bottle of store brand water was 40 cents, a bag of raisins was just over $1. I did get some junk food too. A Milka bar with hazelnuts was 75 cents and a small bag of potato chips was just less than $1. One innovation that I liked at this store was you picked up your plastic bags at the check out before you put your food on the belt so you have time while standing in line to get the bags open and ready. You have to pay for the bags – 2 plastic bags were 11 cents and they have a bar code that is scanned at checkout. Pretty cool.

So I’ve seen Kutna Hora and it’s sprinkling off and on and quite cool and I still have half a day here. I never gauge the right amount of time in any place so either I feel like I have to leave too soon and haven’t experienced enough or I have too much time.
adrienne is offline  
Jun 24th, 2010, 05:20 PM
  #25  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 1,079
Enjoying your report very much. I have been to Prague several times but never is it quite enough. Going back in September. Also Krakow, so looking forward to that part of your trip.
Kristinelaine is offline  
Jun 24th, 2010, 05:28 PM
  #26  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 3,239
I have picked up several super market bags on my trips. I usually ask if they have something larger than the traditional small plastic bags that we usually see.
Sometimes they have very large decorated bags with woven handles that are as large as some department store paper bags that are given out with those sturdy handles. These handles are very strong. They cost about .75cents usually.
I love to use them at home to bag my groceries as they are much larger than the reusable bags being offered here in the States. And they last a long time.
The money you pay for them usually goes to a good cause.
Sher is online now  
Jun 27th, 2010, 03:18 PM
  #27  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,212
Wednesday May 5

Today I could not find my way out of Kutna Hora:

Onward to Cesky Krumlov. The signs to leave Kutna Hora were not reflected on my map. I knew I had to go in the opposite direction from Prague but circled around for about 45 minutes before I found the right direction. I kept coming back to the same traffic circle, perplexed and starting again.

I spotted a police officer on foot patrol and flagged him down. I explained where I wanted to go – Cesky Krumlov and he started laughing and said: “here is Kutna Hora.” He’ll have a chuckle about this for a long time – the crazy tourist who wanted Cesky Krumlov but was in Kutna Hora. He directed me toward Caslav – the closest town on my map and I did see one sign for Caslav and followed it but it lead back to that same traffic circle.

I drove around the circle a couple of times and then finally pulled into a gas station. There were two men standing outside drinking take out coffee and I thought I would have the best chance of getting directions from them. One of them spoke English very well and he gave me exact directions to Caslav. I thanked them and was on my way. Even if I had taken this turn off the circle I don’t think I would have found Caslav without a more detailed map.

After Caslav everything became much easier. I zipped through town after town on my list of towns to watch out for. It’s difficult driving and navigating in the Czech Republic because the names are so foreign to me and many town names look alike. I stopped once for a health break and coffee – instant and dark. When I asked for another creamer I was told I had to pay 4 CZK additional. As I visited more towns in the Czech Republic I realized that charging for additional creamers was the norm.

I was moving on toward Tabor when I saw a sign at the last minute pointing left to Ceske Budejovice. What to do – continue on my route or turn around. I was on a limited access road so exited at the next stop and pulled over to consult the map. It seemed to be about the same distance if I went toward Tabor or took the road to Ceske Budejovice. And there didn’t seem to be an easy way to get back to the turn off for CB.

Outside Tabor, road paving was going on. A large section of road was being paved and there was a long wait. After about 10 minutes a small section of my side was able to move ahead. The road crew were letting many more cars from the other side move along. Finally after another 10 minutes we were let through. This was becoming a very long ride. Between Ceske Budejovice and Cesky Krumlov I stopped at a roadside pension and restaurant. Had a quick bowl of soup and mineral water for 40 CZK. The soup of the day was chicken noodle and it was delicious. I couldn’t believe it was less than $1.50. I finally arrived in Cesky Krumlov, easily found the hotel (quite accidentally), checked in, and parked the car in a parking lot about 10 minutes away. Mappy said the drive from Kutna Hora to Cesky Krumlov was 3 hours. I left at 7:30 and was parking the car at 2:00. What a day!

Cesky Krumlov is another UNESCO world heritage town. This town is quite beautiful with its many colored buildings, cobbled streets, onion domes, and charming frescoes on the buildings. On the way here there were fields of yellow rape seed used to make canola oil. You see these fields all over Europe in the spring – very beautiful. This hotel is posh by my standards – very large room with comfy chairs to sit in. Unfortunately there is no real table for my computer so I’m staked out in the restaurant. There seem to be lots of Americans in this hotel whereas in the other 2 places I stayed there were Czech people and no other guests speaking English.

Hotel Konvice is located in the old town on a pedestrian street. I have a large twin room with separate sections for each bed. There’s a small table and two comfy chairs to sit on and plenty of hanging and shelf space. The bathroom is long and has a great counter for putting toiletries. The stall shower is large and there is a hair dryer in the room. My window overlooks the garden restaurant with a nice view over the rooftops. The rate is E96 for 2 nights including a big buffet breakfast. Parking is through the hotel – you’re given a parking ticket to get into Parking 3. You can go in and out any time with this ticket. The rate is 160 CZK per day, payable when you check out.

Internet access is only available in what they term the salon – a room with tables adjacent to reception.

On the way back from the car park I explored the town, taking lots of photos. It’s very very pretty here. And there are many beautiful buildings and signs to photograph, even on an overcast day. I spent about an hour walking back to the hotel, exploring some side streets and going into St Vitus church (no photos allowed). I was cold so I went back to the hotel and used the internet for a while then went out again with my umbrella as it had begun to rain. I’m not sure where I bought this totally useless umbrella but it broke after about 5 minutes. The wind turned it inside out and bend the shaft and I pinched my finger trying to get it closed. It’s in the garbage now – more room in my suitcase.

I spotted a gift shop specializing in Mucha paraphernalia and went in. There are so many shops in town and not enough tourists at this time of year to support them. I’m not sure how they stay in business unless they depend on the high tourist season. The woman in the Mucha shop spotted what she thought was a live customer and tried to sell me lots of stuff. She was very nice but I have limited space in my suitcase and not much money. I did buy 3 Mucha plastic shopping bags for 15CZK each to give to my bridge group when I next host (hopefully the bags will hold up for a while – they’re very thin) and 2 Mucha note pads.

It had turned cold and drizzly and I didn’t want to venture far so I ate at the hotel. This dinner was my least favorite of the trip so far. Pork cutlet, red cabbage and boiled potatoes (the main course came with dumplings but I had enough of those heavy things) plus a mixed salad and 2 glasses of red wine for 285CZK ($15). The gravy lacked flavor and the red cabbage had too much of something in it (cinnamon? nutmeg?) and not enough vinegar.

There are a lot of people in town during the day; mostly tour groups and day trippers. It’s quiet at night but it isn’t yet the main tourist season.
adrienne is offline  
Jun 27th, 2010, 03:28 PM
  #28  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,212
Thursday May 6

Today I visited a monastery and set off an alarm:

The day began with asking the woman at the front desk to call the car rental people as yesterday I noticed a light on the dashboard. When I checked the owner’s manual it seemed that the light was for something for the exhaust but I thought I’d better let the Budget people know and ask what they thought about this light. When she called and identified the problem they said not to worry about it. The car does work so I’m not worried since it has nothing to do with the oil or engine heat and I’m on record as reporting it so I feel covered.

I drove about 10 minutes to the Zlata Koruna Monastery, not far from Kutna Hora (open Tuesday – Sunday 9:00 – 4:00, 5:00 in summer). It’s reputed to be one of the best preserved Cistercian monasteries in Bohemia. It was founded to thank God for blessing Premysl Otakar II in his victory over the Hungarian King Bela IV in the battle of Kressenbrunn.

The next tour was 15 minutes after I arrived. All visits are by guided tour only and only in Czech although there is a written text in other languages. This place is a bit off the beaten track and there were only about 8 of us on the tour. There is a small brown historical sign on the road toward Ceske Budejovice to mark the turn off. It was a lovely cloister with frescoes, vaulted ceilings, chapel, refectory and a gorgeous church. You can take photos w/o flash in every room except the church (The Church of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary). The church had a beautiful Baroque altar and Stations of the Cross in painted high relief on a gold background. This was the highlight of the cloister. Tickets are 95 CZK. The tour began at 11:00 and lasted an hour.

At one point in the tour you have to stop and put on slippers over your shoes. I was dawdling so rushed to grab a pair of slippers. They were either red or blue and since I’m not fond of red I chose a blue pair which turned out to be the men’s slippers. After I realized they were way too large I noticed that the other women were wearing red. I had a hard time keeping mine on and was shuffling along.

Watch out for red ropes that cordon off displays – they’re alarmed, even when there is no sign about the alarm. In the cloister refectory I accidentally brushed against the red rope and after a few seconds delay there was a shrieking alarm. I jumped back so fast in shock that one of my blue slippers came off! The guide commented that the alarm was quite shocking and it was. I’m never getting near another red rope.

After the tour I stopped in the small restaurant near the church exit. The menu was only in Czech and German but I managed to decipher much of the German and ordered some sort of salad. It was only 50 CZK so I thought it was probably a mixed salad and it was. Tomatoes, cucumbers, red, green, and yellow peppers, and corn. The salad contained the inevitable onions which were plentiful and pungent.

There is also a pension with restaurant to the right as you exit the church.

Back in Cesky Krumlov I walked to the castle and bought a ticket for the 2:00 English tour. The ticket women told me the tour started at the next building (by which she meant the castle).

The rain had began in full fervor but I only had a few minutes to make the tour so I made a dash for it in the rain. I waited in the first courtyard which is where the tour was to begin but there were no other people waiting for tours (only those waiting for the rain to stop and they were watching the rain). As the rain abated I walked to the next courtyard and didn’t see any tour guide or group of people so I asked in a souvenir shop about the tours and was told the first courtyard. By this time it’s several minutes after 2:00. I couldn’t have missed a tour guide (hopefully holding a sign) or a group of people waiting for a tour. Thinking I could possibly have missed the group I walked up to courtyard five anyway looking for an English speaking guide but there was no guided group. I was now annoyed.

I went back to the ticket woman and said there was no tour and tried to get my money back but she shrugged her shoulders and said next tour 3:30 which meant an hour and a quarter to wait around and the possibility of the same thing happening again. I don’t think there was a 2:00 tour since no one else was speaking English. I was probably the only person who bought a ticket for this tour and the guide didn’t show. I decided not to wait for the next tour. Most people in the Czech Republic are either speaking Czech, German, or Polish except the Asian tour groups who have their own guide. At least I got to see the bear in the moat!

After the rain came blue skies, finally, the first since Saturday. I found my way to the Poor Clare Monastery. From the guide book I consulted it seemed as though you could see inside the monastery but there were no open doors selling tickets. There were two signs stating “entrance forbidden” at the garden gate and also on door through which I had seen someone exit. So apparently you can’t go inside.

I had a cappuccino at a café outside the monastery – how delicious – and enjoyed the blue sky – and then slowly made my way back to the hotel gawking at the beautiful buildings.

I decided to try a restaurant with the statue of a waiter holding a tray of menus. This afternoon I was looking at the menu and a German man walked out, saw me and said the food was good (in German but I understood what he meant). I usually wouldn’t frequent a restaurant with a cheesy statue outside but decided to try it.

I walked in and asked for a menu in English and choose beef in a sauce of cranberries and cream and bread dumplings – it sounded delicious. The food arrived about 5 seconds after I ordered – not a very good sign. The dish was just ok. A few slices of pot roast, several slices of bread dumplings – things that looked like sliced white bread but they were dumplings, and a slice of what looked like stuffing. There was some cranberry sauce, a brown gravy (not a lot of flavor) and whipped cream. This is the second time I had a dish with sweetened whipped cream. Before the food arrived I had considered ordering dessert but had second thoughts after tasting the food. That’s 2 for 2 very fair meals in Cesky Krumlov.

The blue sky with a light cloud layer continued and the light was exceptionally luminous as I walked back to my hotel admiring the buildings.

At the hotel I packed up a bit, had a shower then went to the salon to check my email. There was a couple from Virginia sitting there and we chatted for a while listening to the entertainment – 2 gentlemen were playing guitar and singing. After the couple left I moved into the restaurant to hear the music better and to have a glass of wine while typing my report. It’s an enjoyable end to my stay in Cesky Krumlov.
adrienne is offline  
Jun 27th, 2010, 06:42 PM
  #29  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 3,239
Glad you decided to continue your report. And also bringing it to the top.
Sher is online now  
Jun 29th, 2010, 01:52 PM
  #30  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 1,079
Sorry you had just OK food in Cesky Krumlov. We were there about ten years ago and had some very good and interesting food in a very small place where we also had a room. Especially loved their plum dumplings!
Kristinelaine is offline  
Jun 29th, 2010, 03:16 PM
  #31  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,212
Plum dumplings sound delicious! I'm envious! I did have quite good food most of the trip so I can't complain about a couple of meals.
adrienne is offline  
Jun 29th, 2010, 05:52 PM
  #32  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 1,079
Looking forward to more of your report. We're going to Krakow in September. Feel free to mention any good restaurants there.
Kristinelaine is offline  
Jul 1st, 2010, 01:09 PM
  #33  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,212
Friday May 7

Today I found the most beautiful European square:

The scenery in the Czech Republic, particularly in Moravia, is lovely. Lots of rolling hills and farms and rape seed fields. And everywhere you see the onion domes atop churches. The skies were blue today and the weather was mild.

I left Cesky Krumlov early for the two-hour drive to Telc which was probably closer to three hours. I arrived in Telc and parked in lots 2&3 and walked to the left around the corner and through an archway and up a street into the square. What a fabulous sight. This is indeed the most beautiful square I’ve seen. The buildings were mostly pastel colors decorated with white sgraffito, a new architectural term for me. It means a relief of plaster in a contrasting color. The most striking building is the black and white one. I spoke with the woman who owns this building and she told me that they renovated it over the last 20 years. There is a date of 1555 on the building and the portraits are Biblical.

The TI is on the left side of the square, inside the town hall (look for the flag designating a government building). The people are very helpful with booking rooms and they have a large list of pensions to choose from. Once you’ve made your decision they call the pension to ensure there is a vacancy and to answer any questions you may have.

I stayed in a pension right on the square with wifi and a lovely breakfast for about $25 per night. The gentleman I met with speaks English but his wife does not. You can park on the square if there is space available; the pension or hotel will give a parking permit that goes on your dashboard. Since this was not high tourist season there were plenty of spots to park.

I looked in the shops and took lots of photos of the buildings on the square. Lunch was at a restaurant on the square (at the castle end) called Svejk which I would not recommend. My salad and soup were OK but someone who sat at my table ordered a meal that didn’t look like I would want to eat it. Dinner was at Hotel U Cerneho – pork in cream sauce, boiled potatoes and 2 glasses of wine for 238 CZK (less than $13).

As I left the hotel after dinner the art gallery was putting on a little play in front of their building. I had wondered what the raised platform was for and now it became clear. I watched for a few minutes – there were not many people about in the evening. The play ended shortly after and everyone left the square. Not much doing at night in Telc but it was cool in the evening. I imagine in the summer with milder weather the square would have lots of people walking around and enjoying a meal or drink in one of the cafes.
adrienne is offline  
Jul 1st, 2010, 01:28 PM
  #34  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 52,380
hi adrienne,

thank you so much for taking the time to write all this - after visiting Prague for a few days between christmas and New Year a few years ago, we really want to go back and explore the rest of the country, so your report is very useful as well as entertaining.

in your hunt for reasonable restaurants, did you consider the one in the cellar of the municipal building? we had a great dinner there one night, after listening to a New year's concert in the concert hall. the other place we ate at which was very traditional but good was somewhere in the centre - it was full of czechs eating traditional lunches of pork, bread dumplings and potatoes so we joined them. perhaps it's the sort of meal that appeals more in the middle of winter!

looking forward to more,

regards, ann
annhig is offline  
Jul 1st, 2010, 03:10 PM
  #35  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,212
Hi Ann,

Do you mean the Municipal bldg in Prague? I didn't realize the restaurant there was reasonable. It was cool enough most of the time in Prague, especially in the evening, to eat hardy dinners and I loved the meals I had.

I only saw the southern part of the Czech Republic but I loved it. Very beautiful, friendly people, good food (mostly).
adrienne is offline  
Jul 2nd, 2010, 05:49 AM
  #36  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 52,380
hi adrienne,

sorry - yes i meant the municipal building in Prague. as I recall, on the ground floor there was a posh restaurant on one side of the entrance, and a posh looking cafe on the other. but if you went downstairs, there was a beautifully tiled simpler restaurant which we found quite reasonable. not sure how we found it [perhaps looking for toilets!]

we have noe taken winter trips to Prague, Budapest and Krakow which have left us with a yen to explore the rest of those countries so I'm really looking forward to more of your report.
annhig is offline  
Jul 4th, 2010, 03:58 AM
  #37  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 1,079
Hey, adrienne, you're going to finish this, aren't you? It's really good and I need the part about Krakow especially!!!
Kristinelaine is offline  
Jul 4th, 2010, 07:21 AM
  #38  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,212
I promise I will finish. Only a few more days to Krakow. It's Tour de France time and I'm watching fireworks over the Hudson River tonight but I will get cracking on the trip report.
adrienne is offline  
Jul 4th, 2010, 09:56 AM
  #39  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 1,079
OK, adrienne. I await it anxiously. But, first things first!
Kristinelaine is offline  
Jul 4th, 2010, 12:20 PM
  #40  
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 124
Oh, the Hudson. I once spent 4th of July at West Point. The bridges over the Hudson near there were draped with large flags - very nice! I imagine you're in the NYC area, so a little different, but anyway, enjoy the fireworks!
ruthruthruth is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:36 AM.