Cooking classes in England

Jul 3rd, 1999, 07:56 PM
  #21  
April
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I've never understood the cold toast thing. Maybe I didn't know where to eat either but I never once had warm toast in England. It always arrived to the table on a rack, stone cold. Is it the same in other European countries? (And why don't Greeks have toasters?) I agree with Al about the great marmalade. It was the best ever... and I don't even like marmalade.
 
Jul 4th, 1999, 03:22 AM
  #22  
JoAnn
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After having visited more than 30 countries in my lifetime, I have to say that it was on England where I had the most tasteless, disgusting, inedible meals I'd ever had. My humble opinion.
 
Jul 26th, 1999, 05:47 AM
  #23  
carol
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My husband and I went to Paris last year for hte first time, we are considering goint to england this year and I would love to attend a Cordon Bleu Cooking class, i didn't get to go to the one in Paris. Could anybody give me information on this cooking class. Thanks.
 
Jul 26th, 1999, 06:18 AM
  #24  
elvira
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Le Cordon Bleu
Ecole de Cuisine et de Pātisserie
114 Marylebone Lane
London W1M 6HH England
Telephone: 071 935 3503
Fax: 071 0935 7621

A couple of years ago, I received a list of classes: week, month, day....if you write or call them, they'll send you an updated schedule.
 
Dec 18th, 2001, 06:02 PM
  #25  
Debbie
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Have the people posting about poor English food actually been there recently? I wonder-- some of the usual cliche remarks from the 60's and 70's about the culinary experience are stated in this thread. London is now universally known as being very cutting edge in the culinary world. Maybe the complainers should leave the Hard Rock Cafe and dine in a good restaurant for a change.
 
Dec 19th, 2001, 12:21 AM
  #26  
yummy
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yes Debbie,

the world has changed so fast: the English are well known now for their cuisine, the Greec are known for their good organisation, the Germans for driving slow, the Spanish for beeing in time, the French for speaking english ...
 
Dec 19th, 2001, 01:28 AM
  #27  
Edmond O`Flaherty
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Ballymaloe in County Cork is the best-known cookery school in Ireland and gets many foreign students.It has a website at www.cookingisfun.ie.
 
Dec 19th, 2001, 06:37 AM
  #28  
AnnaC
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Sorry, couldn't resist getting in on this thread. Why oh why do people still insist on slating British food? You must just be eating in the wrong places. The last time I had an overcooked vegetable anywhere in Europe was in a French student cafeteria in 1991 and I like my veggies crunchy so it's not just different standards.

To get my own back just a little, I find that by about day 3 of any trip to the US, my body is craving fresh fruit and vegetables because of the lack of sufficient green stuff on the menu. But then, maybe I'm just eating in the wrong places?

Anyways, to try to be helpful, try the following:

http://www.aldeburghcookeryschool.com

http://www.vegsoc.org/cordonvert (for veggie cooking)

[email protected] (sorry, don't have a web address, but this is the e-mail) a very popular TV chef with his own restaurant in Padstow in Cornwall runs seafood cookery courses

www.italiansecrets.co.uk based in Beaconsfield in Buckinghamshire


 
Dec 19th, 2001, 08:14 AM
  #29  
buzz
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>Spanish for beeing in time.

From the nation that gave the world green bean casserole, tuna and mushroom soup casserole, biscuits and gravy (that's scones in some sort of white greasy stuff), coca-cola (it's great for cleaning the loo), the jello cake (yes, really a cake made with a cakemix and a packet of jelly), the famous salad in lemon (sweet) jelly, the stuffed crust pizza and the big Mac let's hear criticism of any other nation's food!
 
Dec 19th, 2001, 08:59 AM
  #30  
sylvia
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Children, children, play nicely now, the elves are listening and you'll get cinders in your stockings.

A quote from Helen's British cooking page worth a visit at
http://www.hwatson.force9.co.uk/

"British cookery is sometimes regarded as a source of fun but actually it ranks with the best cuisines in the world. Some of the best modern chefs are, in fact, British and British cooking has inspired many culinary traditions around the world especially North American and Australian.
British cooking, however, is not just traditional 'Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding'. It reflects and incorporates something from all the cultures and countries Britain has had contact with throughout her long history. I hope my pages reflect the rich tradition of British cooking in its broadest sense"
 
Dec 19th, 2001, 11:13 AM
  #31  
gourmand
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Telling remarks (paraphrased) from those who took defended British food:

"The marmalade is good." (The marmalade?)
"One of the top chefs in France is British" (Wonder why she moved to France?).
"I liked it, but of course I'm used to lousy food." (Try continually banging your head against a wall, so that you'll feel good when you stop.)
"There's a UK Web site that says British cooking is good." (There's probably an Al-Qaeda Web site that says the Taliban is good, too.)
"You're probably eating in the wrong place." (More like the wrong country.)

And from the Land of Pizza Hut, McDonald's and Jell-o, ask yourself this: In the US, a country with incredible diversity, almost any good ethic restaurant is a hit, except for what? (Hint: Begins with a 'B' and ends with an 'h.')
 
Dec 19th, 2001, 12:00 PM
  #32  
Shelley
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This is an interesting thread. I am compelled to say that, with three trips to England under our belts, my husband and I have had marvelous food, and usually in pubs in small villages. The seafood has been great -- good quality and interestingly prepared --- and some of our fondest memories involve sandwiches on delicious bagettes (especially ham and cheese) from a take-away. Oh, we have had some so-so meals. But those are seldom and happened when we were too tired or looking for something cheap. When asked, we always do our best to dispel the myth about English food being bad. I am an excellent and adventurous cook. I know good food, and I have had plenty of it in England!

By the way, there is a relatively new hotel and pub in Stow-on-the-Wold called The Royalist at Stow. (The pub is The Eagle and Child and we had a wonderful meal last June.) The owners used to own a restaurant in London. They have a fabulous menu and on their website I have seen reference to cooking classes with the chef. They look very appealing and I hope I can take advantage of this on my next trip.
 
Dec 19th, 2001, 12:06 PM
  #33  
gourmand
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All right, this is getting downright ridiculous. One of her most memorable British meals was a ham and cheese sandwich?

 
Dec 19th, 2001, 12:32 PM
  #34  
buzz
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Perhaps if gourmand were a gourmet, he might be able to appreciated food.
 
Dec 19th, 2001, 01:49 PM
  #35  
tom
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The folks who insist on repeating the 40 year old cannard about bad British food have either --1) never been there, 2) only eaten at cheap roadside "cafs", or 3) been on tours with equally unadventurous travelers.

Last year, Bon Apetite magazine devoted an entire issue to innovative chefs in the UK, declaring England and especially London the culinary center of Europe. Yes you can get a bad meal there -- but not as bad as at any Denny's in the US. There are more michelin stars in London than in NYC, for crying out loud.
 
Dec 19th, 2001, 01:53 PM
  #36  
Vita
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Actually, I think there's a special issue of Bon Appetite currently on the stands that features cuisine in London's east end.
 
Dec 19th, 2001, 02:14 PM
  #37  
Kathy
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This is the "golden age" of food and England is certainly participating in this. Go to Delia Smith's online website if you think the British can't cook. I tried the figgy pudding recipe we posted here. IT WAS GREAT!!! I also have found world class restaurants in London. Apart from continental imports you also have places like Rules that do wonderful things with meat. I also found an number of mouth watering puddings and other dishes. READ\EAT BEFORE YOU SPEAK IN THIS scenario.
 
Dec 19th, 2001, 02:23 PM
  #38  
Kathy
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Tom I would not go as far as to compare London with NYC. Michelin stars are not the be all of food. I live in NYC and travel to London every couple of years it just is not the case. I have just been to some leading restaurant there some still following 80's style french with heavy sauces and fusion foods being absent from the menu. Just my opinion but you can't compare with NYC. This does not mean food in Britain sucks I just did not see cutting edge cuisine on my sampeling of restaurants. I was there two years ago and things were just starting to change. I also do not think London quite rivals Paris or the entire country of Italy. JMHO. Still wonderful food to be had!!!
 
Dec 19th, 2001, 02:36 PM
  #39  
Roger
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OK,my two cents. The best and I mean the best spaghetti was in Chester and the best ever cannelloni was in Durham. I work in San Francisco and have eaten my share of good pasta but not even close as to what I posted.
 
Dec 20th, 2001, 03:50 AM
  #40  
Shelley
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To Gourmand: Honey, I am not about to let your attitude spoil the wonderful memories I have of my trips to England. Obviously, you have not tasted English cheese, or else you would know how delicious and fresh it is, compared to what we get from England in the US. The stilton is particularly memorable. And the ham, if you like pork, is pretty darn good too. But I am willing to admit that the ambiance of the suroundings certainly could have colored my judgement somewhat, along with the company I had at the time. Sitting on a busy street in the shadow on Canterbury Cathedral with my husband (on our 20th anniversary trip) on a beautiful sunny day watching all the activity of shoppers and tourists and eating a freshly made sandwich on a crusty baguette was very satisfying to both of us. It sure beat a sandwich from Subway. I'm sorry you don't see the appeal, but I am thankful I had the experience.
 

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