Cheese & Pickle ~ Help me do it right?

Old Dec 13th, 2015, 02:12 AM
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Quite Patrick, except that IME chutneys tend to be smoother than Branston, which is a sort of cross between the two - sweet like a chutney but crunchy like a pickle.
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Old Dec 13th, 2015, 02:50 AM
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Branston is what happens when chutney and pickle meets a marketeer,

1) more flavour, (add salt)
2) more crunch, (cook less and chop less)
3) more attractive (add sugar)
4) Lower cost (see above)
5) Higher price (add adverts)

If Western world standards can be seen anywhere it can be seen in Branston pickle, a bit like Kraft (a tasteless cheese maker) buying Cadburies and improving the brand so that Americans now have to buy British imports to get around the c&&p.
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Old Dec 13th, 2015, 03:28 AM
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I am with Bilbo. I cannot imagine using Branston pickle in a sandwich, as it's far too lumpy and also likely to ooze a vinegry brown liquid over your hands. There are far better chutneys and pickles available with a smoother consistency, although they do cost more.

The Branston brand is now owned by Mizcan, a Japanese company.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branston_brand
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Old Dec 13th, 2015, 03:51 AM
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I wasn't saying I liked it [though I don't mind it with a pub ploughmans, if that's all that's on offer], I was trying to explain what it looks and tastes like.

It actually works quite well in a tongue sandwich; I don't like cheese sandwiches at all, with or without chutney, though I like cheese and bread.
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Old Dec 13th, 2015, 04:21 AM
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FWIW I live right next to where they used to make PanYan pickle, if anyone remembers that.
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Old Dec 13th, 2015, 04:47 AM
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vaguely, Patrick - I had to look it up:

http://www.food.com/recipe/a-british...-pickle-246663
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Old Dec 13th, 2015, 04:49 AM
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Are you some sort of hipster, Patrick? Does living near a pickle factory confer some sort of authenticity for Londoners?
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Old Dec 13th, 2015, 04:59 AM
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Does living near a pickle factory confer some sort of authenticity for Londoners?>>

of course - people used to queue up to live near the Walls sausage factory in Edmonton!

[in looking for that, found this fascinating website featuring the London that tourists [hope they] don't see:

http://www.derelictlondon.com/north-...arehouses.html ]
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Old Dec 13th, 2015, 05:12 AM
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>>Are you some sort of hipster, Patrick? <<

No, I don't suit a man-bun. And Broadway Market is so <i>over</i>.
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Old Dec 13th, 2015, 10:22 AM
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God, turning Branston pickle into a lecture on Western mores.

It "works" just fine in a sandwich or if your sensibilities are offended by large junks or possible run- off, there's a small chunk version.
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Old Dec 13th, 2015, 11:52 AM
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Having been raised in a civilized country (not an island and 'overthere' accross the ocean), I'm not into pickles a lot.

I ate relish sauce about 3 times in my life (mostly in Canada), and have some pickles on my 'sandwich au pâté'.
I've never really eaten cheddar, the ones I tried had no taste for me.

Now I've rediscovered pickles in Krakow, and I buy 'ogorki'.

I'll try some magic buns with some pickles, cheddar, pickle.
I hesitate on the olive oil - an european touch ?
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Old Dec 13th, 2015, 11:56 AM
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Having been raised in a civilized country (not an island and 'overthere' accross the ocean)

I thought you're Belgian?
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Old Dec 13th, 2015, 11:56 AM
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I've never really eaten cheddar, the ones I tried had no taste for me.>>

in that case you've probably never had a proper one, Pariswat. the best are definitely full of taste, and quite sharp.

I can't see it really going with olive oil but whatever floats your boat!
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Old Dec 14th, 2015, 05:18 AM
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good point ann, I can't stand Edam, even old Edam and I've just assumed they were rubbish,...... still do
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Old Dec 14th, 2015, 10:00 AM
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Bilbo - I'm not that fond of Edam either but I'm not sure that we get the good stuff here.
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Old Dec 14th, 2015, 10:21 AM
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I do like a nice smoked Edam -- but otherwise why bother
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Old Dec 14th, 2015, 10:31 AM
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There is no good Edam. It looks and tastes like rubber.
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Old Dec 14th, 2015, 10:55 AM
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OK, so a Ploughman's Lunch is some Cheddar, nice crusty bread, butter, and a small, pickled onion ? Anyway, that's how I remember it at my local in the New Forest. Perhaps it's different in other places ?
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Old Dec 14th, 2015, 11:46 AM
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Bedar - that's the general idea. sometimes you have choice of cheese, often you get some chutney as well as a picked onion, sometimes you get a salad "garnish".
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Old Dec 14th, 2015, 12:23 PM
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Not that a ploughman would recognise it as lunch. It was invented in the 1950s to promote eating cheese I believe.
The start of food in pubs though.
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