Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

Building smaller details late Nov. Andalucia trip--some specific questions

Building smaller details late Nov. Andalucia trip--some specific questions

Old Oct 27th, 2023, 10:48 AM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 298
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Building smaller details late Nov. Andalucia trip--some specific questions

Hi, I’m starting to pin down some of the smaller details for my upcoming trip to Andalucia and Madrid – getting very excited—it will be Nov 20-Dec 5. I’m still so grateful for the expert, generous advice on lodging and bases that I've rec'd here. Would be so grateful for any advice on the matters below.

1. Bus vs. train transfers

I’ve read various threads and know that buses (booked through https://www.alsa.com) are very nice and often have more frequent service than trains in some locations ( https://iryo.eu/es/home and https://www.renfe.com/es/en). And if I recall correctly—it’s been several years since I’ve been to Spain, and never to Andalucia—you have to arrive at train stations an hour early to have baggage scanned by security. When we go by train, I’m inclined to book in first class. We’d generally be looking to transfer in the late morning (departures around 11am) and strongly prefer not changing trains or buses during each transfer. I know train tickets may not be available yet for the latter parts of our trip. But I’d like to buy whatever bus/train tickets I can as soon as possible and then buy any train tickets in connection with the latter part of our trip when they become available.

For these transfers, any reason why bus versus train would be a better, e.g., in relation to where the depots are in the city center, opportunities for direct trains/buses? And if we are using the train for a transfer is there any reason to look at RENFE vs IRYO? None of our trips will be that long so uber comfort is not essential (but helpful to have a bathroom and to have less of an impulse to mind one’s bag, and so generally I look at first class when booking trains)

Malaga to Granada

Granada to Seville

Seville to Cordoba

Cordoba to Madrid—this would be on a Sunday, in case that matters in re scheduling—we’d be looking to take a high-speed train, if available; Renfe or IRYO?

Once I get ground transportation sorted, I’ll start looking at buying tickets (and closure days) in re some sights of interest, e.g., museums, churches/mosques. I’d like to keep some open to serendipity, especially because DH often opts to skip some points of interest so he can do some café sitting. I’m hoping that at the time of year we are visiting that I don’t have to buy tickets to absolutely everything in advance to avoid very long lines. If there are any “must buy tickets in advance,” sights of broad interest, then certainly I’d welcome that advice. We already have our Alhambra tickets and have booked with an Alhambra private guide (will bring passports).

I’m going to check for flamenco show tickets at Casa de la Memoria, based on what I’ve read in this forum. Those I know I need to buy in advance and will do so this weekend. But wanted to check that of all the locations we’ll be in, that Seville is the best place for a flamenco show (without dinner)? I’ve looked at the flamenco show finder that Maribel kindly provided to another traveler.

I have to read up a bit on horse ballet and the Sound and Light show in Cordoba (the latter, I know, is strongly recommended by Maribel and others here). Re horse ballet (given that we won’t be in Jerez), is it still a “strongly recommend” in one of the cities we’ll be visiting? We’re not especially into horses per se, but always enjoy seeing performances that reflect important, unique cultural and artistic traditions whenever we travel. And so a horse ballet seems to fit the bill, but welcome thoughts about seeing a horse ballet if one is not in Jerez.

Thanks in advance for any reflections.
studenttobe is offline  
Old Oct 27th, 2023, 11:21 AM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 4,257
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
To the best of my memory, not all ALSA buses have bathrooms on board. I think it depends on the length of the trip. I am quite sure none of our buses had bathrooms. Supposedly some buses make pit stops for bathrooms but the ones we took did not because they are not long trips. We did not have to change trains or buses for our trips except for one. And I think all trains are high speed trains, at least all the trains we took were high speed.

This is what we did: (and this was before the train tracks to/from Granada were finished)
Toledo to Cordoba - we did have to change trains at Atocha in Madrid (but looks like you aren't including Toledo in your itinerary)
Cordoba to Granada - ALSA bus
Granada to Malaga - ALSA bus
Malaga to Seville - train

Whether or not to take the train or the bus really depends on their schedules and what fits with your schedule. We generally left one destination anywhere from 9AM to 11AM. All train and bus stations are in the city center.

KarenWoo is online now  
Old Oct 27th, 2023, 11:29 AM
  #3  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 298
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks so much, KarenWoo—and great point on the bathroom/bus issue given that all of these are relatively short trips. Thanks for the details and for your great trip report (I studied it extensively—even love the way you described the feel of different places). Unfortunately no Toledo on this trip, owing to the amount of time we have. But am scheming about another trip to Madrid as a possible add on to a work trip in 2024, and if that works hope then to stay in Mādrid again (have been previously and love it) and visit Valencia (another place in Spain I’ve long wanted to visit). Thank you!
studenttobe is offline  
Old Oct 27th, 2023, 01:16 PM
  #4  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 7,427
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
No, you don't need to be at the Andalusian train station an hour in advance. 30 minutes will do.
In Sevilla, luggage will be scanned by security but it takes just seconds. In Córdoba it may or not be scanned, but again just seconds, less than a minute. In Madrid at Atocha for your trains bound for the south, luggage and handbags are also scanned (people are not) but it doesn't take long, unless it's a very busy day, but we're talking a few minutes in line, nothing more.

As Karen notes, whether to take the bus or train, for example, from Granada to Sevilla, or Málaga to Granada, depends on what departure time is most convenient for you. Although the train is a bit quicker, the bus departures are a bit more frequent. Alsa buses are comfortable.

From Sevilla to Córdoba it makes far more sense to take the fast high speed train, not the bus, whether it be a new spiffy Iryo, the Italian Frecciarossa train, or Renfe's AVE or the Avlo, Renfe´s discount, low cost train (where extra baggage, seat assignments, etc. are an additional charge and there is no bar car----but it's only a 45 minute ride!)

Córdoba to Madrid---again, please take the high speed train rather than the bus! Sunday makes no difference in number of departures. it´s an extremely popular route and has been since its beginning in 1992.
Whether you want to splurge on a bit more comfort, nicer, newer seats and better catering on the new Italian Iryo or whether Renfe's AVE (again, running on that route since 1992) or Renfe's new-ish low cost AVLO (like a budget airline) will do, it's up to you.
Check www.trainline.com for the difference in pricing. Trainline will give you the pricing for all 3. Again, it's only a 1 hr. 52 to 2 hr. ride.
AVLO has no first class seating since it's a low cost/budget train.
AVE does, and it's called the Elige Confort fare with a larger seat, more leg room and 2-1 seat configuration.
and also there is AVE Premium fare with seat selection, a meal delivered to your seat (breakfast, mid morning snack, lunch, afternoon snack or dinner with wine/beer/cordials, etc), access to the Sala Club VIP lounge, same class of seating, same 2-1 seat configuration but no cancellation or change fees.

Tickets to be purchased in advance, in addition to the Alhambra tickets that you already have.
1. Alcázar in Sevilla, simple to avoid the long lines. No need to do this far in advance, just a week before

2. Cathedral in Sevilla, ditto. Or go first the the Iglesia del Divino Salvador, a Baroque majesty, when it opens at 10:30 and purchase a joint ticket for this church, the Cathedral and the Giralda. This ticket doesn't have to be used the same day. It's good for 3 days. It allows you to skip the often very long lines at the Cathedral. The ticket is called the "Visita Conjunta Catedral + Giralda + Iglesia Collegial del Divino Salvador.

3. A flamenco performance at Casa de la Memoria.
Yes, Sevilla is the place for you to see the best flamenco.
They do sell out, so a few days in advance will do. But there are now 20+ flamenco venues in Sevilla. For my money, the best are in this order----Casa de la Memoria, Tablao Alvarez Quintero, Museo del Baile Flamenco and Casa de la Guitarra. Look at all the performance info at www.flamencotickets.com to compare pricing, length of performance, number of dancers, venue, whether drinks/food are sold (for the most authentic flamenco go to a smaller, intimate venue with no drinks or food---flamenco is not a dinner theater type of art form)

4. The sound and light evening show, the Soul of Córdoba at the Mezquita-Cathedral. It does sell out.

5. The horse ballet, or dressage show, at the Real Caballerizas in Córdoba is not as impressive as the one at the Real Escuela del Arte Ecuestre in Jerez, but it will give you a very good idea of this art form and the sheer beauty and elegance of these Andalusian horses. It´s up to you. In Córdoba there isn't as much to do at night as in Sevilla, so this and the Soul of Córdoba evening Mezquita-Cathedral show are a good way to spend your evenings.

Last edited by Maribel; Oct 27th, 2023 at 01:59 PM.
Maribel is online now  
Old Oct 27th, 2023, 01:25 PM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,218
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I was underwhelmed by the horse show in Cordoba, though if you have nothing else to do.....
shelemm is offline  
Old Oct 27th, 2023, 01:38 PM
  #6  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 7,427
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
In comparison to the Real Escuela in Jerez, the show may seem underwhelming (I've seen both as well as the show at the Yeguada de la Cartuja, the Spanish Riding School in Vienna, the Cadre Noire spectacle in Saumur and the Portuguese School of Equestrian Art in Lisbon, so I have a basis of comparison of dressage performances), but again,
Córdoba doesn't have that many evening activities, as in the past most visitors simply came on a day trip from Sevilla. The tourist board, to entice visitors to spend the night, have added these attractions---the evening horse ballet and the Soul of Córdoba evening show at the Mezquita/Cathedral.

You may simply want to have a lovely dinner at the Hospes or at another elegant dining venue, such as the Ermita de la Candelaria.

Last edited by Maribel; Oct 27th, 2023 at 01:51 PM.
Maribel is online now  
Old Oct 27th, 2023, 01:40 PM
  #7  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 298
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the wealth of extremely precise information, Maribel--it's tremendously helpful. Will dig in this weekend on ground transport tickets, where possible. Thanks as well for the information on tickets and performances where purchasing in advance (and how far) is important.
studenttobe is offline  
Old Oct 27th, 2023, 02:17 PM
  #8  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 298
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Many thanks to Shelemm and Maribel for the reflection on the horse ballet. I'll definitely consider both of your views and do a bit more research this weekend to get a better sense of whether it would be enjoyable to us.

A great dinner (and have been collecting dining recs from reports and threads here and on Hungry Onion) is always a plus in my book, as are evening strolls and relaxing at a beautiful hotel (as Hospes surely seems to be). We live far too quickly at home and surely work too much, and so having a segment of a trip where you can be in a beautiful place and just slow down certainly appeals.

I'll also take a look this weekend at some short videos on line of both the horse show and the sound and light show to get a better feel as to whether I think we'd enjoy. Re the latter, these kinds of shows are not usually something I enjoy especially--they can be very beautiful, but sometimes feel a bit too produced for my taste compared to seeing a particular historic site w/o added bells and whistles. But as several people here have recommended--and understood what you are saying, Maribel about there being less to do in Cordoba at night compared to say Seville--I'll take a closer look.)

I can also imagine that at that point in our trip (and having spent the prior 5 nights in Seville) that we might be ready to slow down before our final stop--an exciting, but too short stay in Madrid. Haven't yet been able to add a third night to our Madrid stay, owing to a work trip that bumps up against our Spain vacation. But booked a refundable extra night at our hotel in Madrid in case that possibility opens up closer to our departure. Thanks again to you both for your thoughts--as always, the members of this forum amaze me.
studenttobe is offline  
Old Oct 27th, 2023, 02:23 PM
  #9  
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 23,114
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Hi!!

Curious if you are going to try for a table at NOOR..I've not yet decided for my own trip in March. Maribel, do you know how far ahead seats book out, for 2 diner?


Looks like smashing trip and I will follow along closely as part of my own vacation will mirror your footsteps, and I will take train fro Atocha to Cordoba..


I thought that the show at Casa de la Memoria in Sevilla was lovely!
ekscrunchy is offline  
Old Oct 27th, 2023, 02:57 PM
  #10  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 298
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Hi Eks--I'm considering Noor, but am studying lots of dining options in each of our bases (including close looks at the menus, and of course the marvelous reflections of so many here and on HO-not least yours!). I plan to get the dining part of the trip sorted out in the next 2.5 weeks. (Particularly busy time at work so am squeezing in trip planning in my 'non-quality' times of day.) I admit that I'm sometimes underwhelmed when I have had the great fortune of eating at some Michelin two stars--one stars I usually find more appealing and memorable. (And of course simple, rustic "no stars" where the family is in the kitchen cooking grandma's recipes are often the greatest gift. I know from you've written here and elsewhere that you are also great fan of the simple, but perfectly prepared dish with local ingredients.) Sometimes with the two stars I feel the chefs get too chef-fy (and I was long ago a chef, though not in any starred restaurant), a little precious for my taste, and sometimes too int'l (rather than local, though from the quick look at Noor's menu it looks deeply rooted in the region). Sometimes I feel the food becomes so complicated that the wait staff become a kind of guest at the table with long explanations of what you've eaten and a big 'reveal.' That said, I've been very fortunate to eat at some great restaurants, including some two stars where I still think about our dinners (e.g. in Lyon, Paris, Barcelona and Rose--spread out over many years--and all pre-covid times). So, all of this is to say that I'm not sure yet about whether I'll go to Noor. But I haven't yet read deeply about it, but will soon. Open of course to hearing about anyone's experiences. Will be sure to share any impressions on any restaurants once we are home. )

And thanks for sharing about the show at Casa de la Memoria (and about our trip more broadly).

Maribel (or anyone else): I know I have somewhere a note I made after reading your response to someone who a few weeks ago asked about a patio that is worth visiting in late November. I recall that the person asked about one that was apparently quite famous. You replied that in late November you wouldn't recommend it, but instead recommended another. I will score my notes for your specific reference, but if it occurs to you or someone else puts their finger on it, I'd be grateful for its name (and any info on whether that is something that should be ticketed far in advance.) Thanks very much.

Last edited by studenttobe; Oct 27th, 2023 at 03:46 PM. Reason: made an error in one sentence
studenttobe is offline  
Old Oct 28th, 2023, 03:33 AM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 7,427
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
It's s very sound idea to look at the YouTube videos (or others) on both the Soul of Córdoba evening show and the horse ballet really to see if both or either appeal to you particularly.

As to Córdoba dining, you will have a high end, Michelin starred option in Noor--tasting menus only. Paco Morales is considered one of Andalucía's top chef and was recently chosen to prepare the dinner for the European summit at the Granada Parador.
But you'll also have his casual, market to table second spot, El Bar de Paco Morales, where I've had very pleasant lunches at the bar, outside of the souk-like atmosphere of the eateries surrounding the Mezquita Cathedral. To snag a coveted table here you need to reserve. He serves here updated Córdoba classics.
https://elbardepacomorales.com

Or for contemporary dining there´s also La Cuchara de San Lorenzo, blessed with 1 Repsol sun---very creative and outside of the historic area
https://www.lacucharadesanlorenzo.es.

You also have the highly regarded Tierra Olea, a Michelin Bib Gourmand, for less money, a great value, that visitors have loved. It´s outside of the historic quarter but well worth the taxi ride to the Barrio de Arruzafilla, but the chef serves 2 tasting menus, priced at 48 and 64, if you don't mind a tasting menu (some do, some don't) It's closed Sunday.
https://terraolearestaurante.com

Others with Repsol suns, Choco, Casa Pepe de la Judería, Celia Jiménez. You´ll be spoiled for dining choices. Córdoba has come into its own gastronomically speaking.

And I usually suggest that when in Córdoba, as a contrast to contemporary fare, one should try to dine once at a typical, atmospheric, locally popular, classic taberna with flower filled inner courtyard, again, away from the crowds of the Judería.
For this, the historic, 19th century Taberna San Miguel Casa el Piso sits on a pretty little square, is now in its fourth generation of the same family, is very popular and serves the local Montilla Moriles wines. The King's sister, on her recent visit, dined there and also at the Ermita de la Candelaria. Here you can taste typical Córdoban specialties like eggplant with cane honey (berenjenas con miel), ox tail stew (rabo de toro), salmorejo (the thick gazpacho topped with slivers of Iberian ham), ajo blanco (cold almond soup), flamenquines, pisto, the local version of ratatouille, alcachofas a la montillana (artichokes cooked in the local Montilla-Moriles wine). cocido croquettes, etc.
https://www.casaelpisto.com

Another of these classic tabernas is Taberna Salinas, closer to the Judería on Calle Tundidores, the same type of atmosphere and was just given a Repsol Guide "solete" for their extensive tapas menu and moderate prices.
​​​​​​​Both are recommended by the gastro critic of ABC as two of the emblematic, historic taverns of Córdoba. This tavern has been the haunt of matadors, artists, intellectuals since the 1920s.
La original Taberna Salinas en Córdoba - Taberna Salinas

The Palacio de Viana on the Plaza de Don Gome is the aristocratic home I referred to as well worth the visit, as it has 12 connecting patios and is an actual palace-museum. You don´t need to take the tour of the upstairs rooms to enjoy it. You can stroll amidst the patios with their pretty Andalusian tiles and fountains, the gardens, visit the stables and kitchen downstairs on your own. Closed Mondays. No need to purchase tickets in advance.
https://www.turismodecordoba.org/palace-of-viana
Palacio de Viana - Palacio de Viana

Maribel is online now  
Old Oct 28th, 2023, 06:56 AM
  #12  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 298
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Maribel, Many thanks for this absolute gold mine of detailed, thoughtful information. You are amazing—I’m so very much in your debt.
studenttobe is offline  
Old Oct 28th, 2023, 08:56 AM
  #13  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 7,427
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
You're welcome, studenttobe.
I forgot to mention mike's recent find on another thread in a residential neighborhood across the Roman bridge, Bar Seneca, which is also Repsol recommended with a "solete"
It's been in the same family for 3 generations. A non-pretentious, "mom and pop" type place cooking traditional cuisine, probably recipes passed down from grandma. Closed Wednesday. I have it on my list to try pre Holy Week.
Maribel is online now  
Old Oct 28th, 2023, 10:57 AM
  #14  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 298
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Love this sort of place-many thanks for flagging Maribel (and Mike). Indeed, earlier read Mike's very interesting thread and hoping during future trips to book the wonderful apartments he mentioned. But for now, a great reminder about his "living like a local" food finds. Thanks!
studenttobe is offline  
Old Oct 28th, 2023, 12:05 PM
  #15  
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 4,257
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
In Cordoba, we loved our meal at Regadera which is located on the river bank. Reservations are necessary. One of the best meals of our trip. I wrote in my notes that my dessert was violet ice cream with lime crumble, lemon foam and strawberries. So delicious! After dinner we took our time strolling across the Roman Bridge. There were many Spanish families on the bridge with their children riding bikes and eating ice cream. This was on a Saturday night. We also loved trying different food stalls at Mercado Victoria one night.

And we loved Palacio de Viana! Definitely worth a visit. And it was much quieter than other places. A hidden gem! At least it was in 2017. Maybe it's become more well-known now.
KarenWoo is online now  
Old Oct 28th, 2023, 12:08 PM
  #16  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 298
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Your dessert sounds like magic, KarenWoo. Thanks for the lovely description of an evening stroll across the bridge (that’s exactly our vision of a perfect evening). And thanks for the tip on the food stalls and Palacio de Viana-it’s all so enticing! Thank you!
studenttobe is offline  
Old Oct 28th, 2023, 12:18 PM
  #17  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 7,427
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
The Roman Bridge illuminated at night is very romantic!

If you do stroll through the Mercado Victoria, which is in the park, the Jardines de la Victoria, and is an international gourmet food court, in my recent later winter visit it was much more lively at night, especially on weekends, when it attracts a young crowd.
Inside this food court, the Salmoreteca is a good place to try (if you haven't already) the local version of salmorejo, the thick gazpacho topped with bits of Iberian ham, along with traditional gazpacho and their tortilla española (the classic potato, egg and onion dish).

Restaurante Regadera, on the river walk, which is the Ronda de Isasa, and adjacent to the Roman Bridge, also has a Repsol guide "solete" and is open on Sundays. Don't know what days of the week your Córdoba visit will fall...
https://www.regadera.es

As I mentioned above, you'll be spoiled for good dining choices in Córdoba. Just look on each restaurant's web site and choose the menus that most appeal to you.

Last edited by Maribel; Oct 28th, 2023 at 01:04 PM.
Maribel is online now  
Old Oct 28th, 2023, 01:09 PM
  #18  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 298
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks so much, Maribel! Will surely stroll through the Mercado. And very much appreciate the suggestions on things we must try (and surely will!).

On tortilla española, you made me smile. I learned to prepare it years ago from a former colleague who was from Zaragoza (and whom I haven't seen in forever). I always think of her when I make it annually as part of our regular summer picnic fare. And it (first purchased as a sandwich at a Madrid train station) --along with my first real baguette in Paris-take me back to my student days--decades ago [despite my screen name ] when I spent a summer on a Eurrail pass in Europe. The tortilla and later the baguette were so shockingly good and simple that it forever shaped my impression that food was just simply better in Europe, even when I had just a few dollars a day to spend.
studenttobe is offline  
Old Oct 30th, 2023, 05:47 AM
  #19  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 7,427
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Currently, between Sevilla and Córdoba

Renfe´s AVE train one way fares vary considerably, depending on date & departure time. The early bird catches the worm.
AVE has 4 classes of tickets, básico, elige, elige confort & premium (this with food/drink served at one's seat).

Renfe's AVANT train costs €22.30, one way. Fare doesn't change and can't be booked well in advance.
AVANT has only 1 class of service, basic (no premium seat, no meal service), and does not continue to Madrid.
Same 47-48-minute ride
renfe.com

IRYO train one way fares also vary considerably, depending on date & departure time. The early bird catches the worm.
The IRYO trains have 4 classes of service: initial, singular, singular only you & infinita gran confort bistró (this with food/drink served at one's seat).
Same 47-minute ride
iryo.eu.
(website only offers tickets for IRYO trains, not RENFE trains)
IRYO is a different company, a consortium between Air Nostrum and Trenitalia, Renfe's new competitor on this route

www.trainline.com is the web site that offers fares both for all RENFE trains (MD, ALVIA, AVANT, AVLO, AVE, etc.) and IRYO and OUIGO, the French discount competitor.
The latter currently operates only on the Madrid-Zaragoza-Barcelona line & Madrid-Valencia-Alicante line.
Trainline charges a small booking fee.

edit: just responding to a post above mine, an AI, that has now been deleted. Never mind!
Maribel is online now  
Old Oct 30th, 2023, 05:58 AM
  #20  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 298
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks very much, Maribel—this is greatly helpful. Plan to secure all of our ground transport tickets over the next day or two. So this is very well timed-thanks
studenttobe is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Manage Preferences - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -