British supermarket goodies?

Aug 29th, 2013, 12:27 PM
  #41  
 
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Yes, Pal--the Paracetamol in the UK is a stronger dosage than our Tylenol here. They gave my son paracetemol when he was sick during our London visit.
europeannovice is offline  
Aug 29th, 2013, 12:48 PM
  #42  
 
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Tylenol and paracetamol are really the same thing — both are acetaminophen. You can get Tylenol with codeine in the US, but only by prescription (it's called Tylenol 3).
Heimdall is offline  
Aug 29th, 2013, 12:48 PM
  #43  
 
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Nurofen Plus, my favorite. And I do, indeed, stock up.
MmePerdu is offline  
Aug 29th, 2013, 01:02 PM
  #44  
 
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Yes the over the counter Tylenol and Paracetamol are the same thing except for the dosage. The paracetamol that you get over the counter in the UK is a stronger dosage than that sold as Tylenol in the US. This is both regular strength and without the codeine which in the US is available only by prescription.
europeannovice is offline  
Aug 29th, 2013, 01:08 PM
  #45  
 
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Don't recall aspirin plus codeine, but definitely worth it to stock up on the paracetamol or ibuprofen plus codeine (Nurofen plus) varietals.

Paracetamol is the international name for acetaminophen. Tylenol is a brand name. The equivalent in the UK is Panadol. Paracetamol dosages aren't necessarily stronger - OTC varieties maximize at 500 mg. Hospital and Rx-only dosages can be different. But in the UK, unlike much of the rest of Europe, you can get paracetamol with codeine without a prescription.

Nurofen gel is also good for muscle aches and it doesn't stink like Ben-Gay or similar treatments.
BigRuss is offline  
Aug 29th, 2013, 01:43 PM
  #46  
 
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The paracetamol that you get over the counter in the UK is a stronger dosage than that sold as Tylenol in the US.

You should be aware of how much acetaminophen you are taking, because too much can cause liver damage. I believe the maximum daily dose is 4000 mg, or the equivalent of 8 extra-strength (500 mg) tablets.
Heimdall is offline  
Aug 29th, 2013, 03:12 PM
  #47  
 
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Marmalade. Marmalade in the US is crap. I doubt it's even had an orange waved at it.

Green and Blacks, and Willies chocolate.

French Fancies!
RM67 is offline  
Aug 29th, 2013, 03:21 PM
  #48  
 
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bookmarking
partyon is offline  
Aug 29th, 2013, 04:05 PM
  #49  
 
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Fortunately, our local supermarket stocks Tiptree and we've found Yorkshire tea on line. Leaves more room in the suitcase for the Kleenex.
VirginiaC is offline  
Aug 29th, 2013, 04:28 PM
  #50  
 
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I can now get PG Tips in the US at a decent price from Amazon but there's a nice tea my personal courier service will be bringing me next week, Indian Prince from Co-op.
MmePerdu is offline  
Aug 29th, 2013, 04:39 PM
  #51  
 
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Why did they take the not for girls label off the York bars? We can get them in world market and my local publix has HP brown sauce now! I love that stuff. I love to get the mince pies and drool over the Christmas cakes that are in the store in Sept. I am going to bring one of those home someday. US chocolate has a much higher content of wax to keep it from melting and does not taste as good as UK or German chocolate imo or swiss.
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Aug 29th, 2013, 05:08 PM
  #52  
 
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If buying codeine containing medicines, also be aware that they are on the list of prohibited drugs in some countries,and that you may be required to show a prescription in others to prove that you have them "legitimately" otherwise detection on arrival may cause problems.

I think Greece is in this category, but you should make your own enquiries, particulalry where you know that the drugs are banned / prescription only in some jurisdictions.
bendigo is offline  
Aug 29th, 2013, 05:12 PM
  #53  
 
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Jaffa Cakes--chocolate covered cookies with orange jelly filling. I love them.

Hershey makes Cadbury for the U.S., and it is not nearly as good as British--it tastes like Hershey's. I haven't been to London since Mondelez has owned it and can't say if it is still as good as it was. It used to have lots more butterfat than ours.
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Aug 29th, 2013, 05:46 PM
  #54  
 
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They gave us the 500mg dosage at the hospital and that was what was available over the counter too.

In the states, a regular strength is 325mg.

Of course, one should not overdose on anything but I was surprised by the difference in dosages--500mg. vs. 325mg.
europeannovice is offline  
Aug 29th, 2013, 09:51 PM
  #55  
 
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I found compeed to be the best thing for blisters.

http://www.compeed.co.uk/

But it's best to deal with the "blister" before it becomes a blister - zinc oxide tape applied over the hotspot is the best option.

You can also get them in Superdrug and both do their own brand versions
alanRow is offline  
Aug 30th, 2013, 04:09 AM
  #56  
 
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If you are in the midlands you may be able to get Brain's Faggots. While I amuse myself by looking out for La Clape wine in the better wine shops.
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Aug 30th, 2013, 05:20 AM
  #57  
 
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I'd have to agree that the North American made Cadbury products taste different than UK made versions. (Same for Toblerone products.) I seem to recall reading somewhere that NA tastes in chocolate prefer more sugar in the recipe, and it would seem to taste that way too.

I always stock up on small(ish) food products from the aisles of Waitrose, Tesco and sometimes M&S. Always pick up a proper Battenberg or two (instead of the mini finger variety) and my favourite, Walnut cake. Also love Apricot cream rolls. Favourite M&S purchase 2 years ago near Christmas was a tiny (almost sample size) jar of Truffle honey which was a product of Italy. It cost about GBP 6 but was worth it. Also Thorntons Brazil nut toffee, Black currant cordial and soft rubbery fruit jelly mix instead of the powder crystals. If I was allowed to, I'd also bring back smoked kippers and a good Melton Mowbray. Then there are the cheeses.... Stinking Bishop...

Here in Southern Ontario it's quite common to find 'British Import Stores' - small (tiny in some cases) family run businesses exclusively selling British imported foodstuff and confectionery...and Football memorabilia...oh, and comics (Beano, Dandy, Topper which I grew up reading as a kid !). Thus all varieties of sweets and chocolates, biscuits (Dark choc Jaffa Orange cakes !) and speciality tins, bags of crisps and snacks, all manner of pickles, tinned foods and wide selections of seasonal fare such as at Christmas and Easter from all regions of the UK. They are more expensive than their locally made counterparts if there are any, but if you really want them they're available.
Mathieu is offline  
Aug 30th, 2013, 05:20 AM
  #58  
 
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Was in London last March - bought Cadbury's mini eggs (candy coated chocolate), brought them back to States and did comparison test with US Cadbury's mini eggs - the UK eggs even had a different appearance and were much better quality chocolate!
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Aug 30th, 2013, 05:30 AM
  #59  
 
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Almost anything out of Marks and Spencers.
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Aug 30th, 2013, 05:42 AM
  #60  
 
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Tea! Even the supermarket brand Waitrose's own tea is good and the prices are about half what supermarkets in the states charge for the same brand.

McVities-Hobnobs and Digestive biscuits.

I still miss the scones from the UK tastes totally different than the bakery variety sold here.
emily71 is offline  

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