Bringing wine back from italy

Mar 28th, 2002, 03:47 PM
  #1  
Jenni Carcelli
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Bringing wine back from italy

I am travelling to Italy for the 1st time and would like to know how much wine i can bring back duty free, I am flying in and out of London
 
Mar 28th, 2002, 05:01 PM
  #2  
peter
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i believe that us customs allows 1 liter per person duty free. i have on many occcasins put a bag containing several bottles of grappa under the agents nose and the usual reposnse is none at all- no problem no duty just do not try to hide and smuggle excess in because if caught they can get very upset
 
Mar 28th, 2002, 05:53 PM
  #3  
jimmy
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Last year I brought back 18 bottles of wine from France thru Customs in Atlanta. I went to declare them, told them what I had and they said the duty was not worth calculating. I have seen similar postings as this many times on Fodors, Wine Spectator, etc.
It wasnt fun lugging it around but a lot of fun enjoying it back home.
 
Mar 28th, 2002, 08:07 PM
  #4  
barbara
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A clarification: according to a customs official whom we've asked, it is actually one liter of alcohol that you can bring back. Since a bottle of wine is not pure alcohol, the amount you can bring back will vary. We calculated it out to be approximately 9 bottles of wine. On a recent trip we had about 15 bottles, told them coming through, and it was fine.
 
Mar 28th, 2002, 08:19 PM
  #5  
Rex
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I don't think that this explanation is correct - - about 1 liter of ("pure") alcohol. As good a story as any to tell you - - to convey that they just really don't care about a dozen or two bottles of wine.

State ABC (Alcoholic beverage commissions) people might be another story. Infamous (though rare) stories exist of state ABC officials confiscating every last drop - - you don't have a license to import for even ONE bottle. so it's always a risk. And it's the jurisdiction of the state in which you touch down (and maybe your subsequent destination state[s], too).

Search my ancient post - - re-posted often by seeking "winespectator".

Best wishes,

Rex
 
Mar 29th, 2002, 03:44 AM
  #6  
dean
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I have been in the wine business almost 30 years. Rex is right about state laws being different and how they are enforced. I ahve brought home 18 bottles with no problem as the total value of my purchases was under teh allowable duty free limit. I have not really heard of anyone not being able to bring in wine coming thru customs at Washington, New York, Chicago, LA etc. However I have heard of people having their wines held up if shipped. The problem with shipped wine is that you may need a customs broker to clear you wines and that could well run into the hundres of dollars and your wine will be in a non-temperature controlled warehouse somewhere. I recomend getting a stryofoam wine shipper box and checking your wine thru.
 
Mar 29th, 2002, 04:02 AM
  #7  
FloridaGirl
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I've heard that you cannot bring any wine into Florida. Anyone know if this is true, and in practice how this relates to bringing wine back from a flight from Europe? Thanks.
 
Mar 29th, 2002, 05:27 AM
  #8  
Lorenz
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Florida Girl
In Florida you can carry wine in. You can't mail or ship wine in unless you are a liscened distributor. ABC liquors
has wrapped up our state legislature.
As a side note all customs inspectors are Federal customs agent.
Advice. Buy only wines that you know you can't find in the USA. Totting around wine bottles gets heavy quickly.
Make it worth the effort.
 
Mar 29th, 2002, 11:20 AM
  #9  
Beth
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I plan to bring home a few bottles from France. What is the best way to pack them? And I assume you all take this as part of your carry-on.
 
Mar 29th, 2002, 11:31 AM
  #10  
Rex
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I check wine. I did before 9-11 (and again on 9-30), and I think it will still be the best way now.

I use my rollaboard as a case. I pack each bottle (this is for 8 to 15 bottles) carefully - - the best is those corrugated wappers - - you can get these at better enoteche (plural of enoteca - - wine shop).

I carry with me a LARGE canvas duffel, empty when I leave home. I put some stuff in the rollaboard - - above and below - - then I put most of my clothes AROUND the rollaboard - - INSIDE the duffel bag. The rollaboard becomes like the yolk in an egg.

It's heavy to do this (say 50 pounds), but it has never failed me - - magnums, half-cases, you name it.

Buona degustazione..
 
Mar 29th, 2002, 12:19 PM
  #11  
top
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Lug this big 'ol thread back up to the top!
 
Mar 29th, 2002, 12:28 PM
  #12  
kathy
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Why in the world would you want to bring all those heavy bottles back when you can get them for a few dollars more at the local store. Spend your money on something else.
 
Mar 29th, 2002, 01:15 PM
  #13  
Oh oh oh
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<<Why in the world would you want to bring all those heavy bottles back>>

If you don't know, it won't do any good to tell you?

Why do you stop and read a post like this? Let alone thumb your nose at us that know and appreciate these great fruits of the vine!
 
Mar 29th, 2002, 01:38 PM
  #14  
sandi
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Rex, have you ever had the airline weigh your "rollaboard"? I know that after we carefully wrapped our wine bottles in clothes and put them in our carryon bag, the lady at the airport in Rome said we couldn't carry it on because it weighed too much. We had to check it and we lost a very nice bottle.
 
Mar 29th, 2002, 01:41 PM
  #15  
Rex
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I check it. It's "entombed" in my duffel bag.

Re-read.
 
Mar 29th, 2002, 01:59 PM
  #16  
sandi
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Ahhh, excuse me.
 
Mar 29th, 2002, 03:14 PM
  #17  
Rex
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No problem. Hope I didn't seem rude.
 
Mar 29th, 2002, 03:39 PM
  #18  
Dean
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Kathy

Please dont spea of what you obviously don't really know about. When i visited the Enoteca in Montalcino, I bought half a dozen Brunelli di Montalcino at prices of anywhere from $20 to $30 a bottle. In Washington DC these bottles, is you could find them, would have retailed for $50 to $100 a bottle. Plus I got to taste several of them for the price of $4.00 a glass. I did not by a bottle ro 2 of Dal Forno Romano in Venice when I could have for $35.00 a bottle and wound up paying $79.95 for it. If you stick to the very best Italy has to offer, and you buy rare wines of great quality, you save hundreds of dollars a case. I would say that that is worth it.

I always carry my wine home, usually checked as baggage in a stryofoam wine shipper. Never ahd a problem and even when I declare it at full prices paid, I ahve never paid any duty on it.
 
Mar 29th, 2002, 06:48 PM
  #19  
Jim
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Being the organized guy that I am, it begs the question. Where does one buy a styrofoam wine carrier?
 
Mar 29th, 2002, 08:45 PM
  #20  
dean
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Most good wine shops carry them. Mail boxes etc has them but for a pretty penny. If you live in a "reciprocal state" you can order a case of wine from a winery and they will use a styrofoam shipper to get the wine to you. You can reuse it. Try www.ridgewine.com and you get some of California's best wines AND the shipper.
 

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