Books On Living in France

Old Mar 15th, 2013, 01:34 PM
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I've been discarding books and other things to reduce what I have for personal reasons,
I've kept, that is a huge book but wonderful for someone thinking of living in France but not decided where is
Living in France-beautiful photos and what it's like in each area, by James Bently.
Another, A huge volume is Culinaria France, about the food and restos, again, with wonderful pictures
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Old Aug 28th, 2015, 05:08 PM
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So wonderful to have this at the top again!
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Old Feb 28th, 2016, 08:27 AM
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What a marvelous place to discover books centered on France. I have read and enjoyed two French books lately, and I'd like to recommend them here. "The Promise of Provence," by Patricia Sands and "Spirit of Lost Angels," by Liza Perrat. Both of these books are well-written and highly entertaining. I've included the Amazon links so Francophiles can check them out.

http://www.amazon.com/Promise-Proven...se+of+provence

http://www.amazon.com/Spirit-Lost-An...of+lost+angels
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Old Feb 28th, 2016, 08:53 AM
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The Most Beautiful Walk in the World, John Baxter
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Old Feb 28th, 2016, 10:42 AM
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"Long Ago in France", "Two Towns in Provence" and "A Considerable Town" are good ones, by MFK Fisher.
Though the content was written during a period from the early 1920's through the mid-1960's, there are many aspects of living in France that have not changed one bit.
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Old Feb 28th, 2016, 11:36 AM
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I liked peter mayle 'une année en provence' - must exist in english.
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Old Feb 28th, 2016, 12:03 PM
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Peter Mayle - A Year in Provence. But sorry, one of the most pretentious books ever written, and he was run out of town by his French neighbors for being the obnoxious rich Brit ex-ad man that he was. And for actually using the real names of his French neighbors, which is absolutely taboo in France (though Martin Walker sometimes gets away with it within a fictitional context). He fled to the Caribbean and wrote a couple of other mildly entertaining fiction books, like Chasing Cézanne.

Anything by MFKFisher is a prize.
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Old Feb 28th, 2016, 12:07 PM
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Maman avait aimé, pourant
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Old Mar 2nd, 2016, 07:47 PM
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Here are two more delightful books to add. Memoirs of the author's experience as an au pair in France, the stories offer great insight into privileged family life.
French Illusions ~ two book series

http://www.amazon.com/French-Illusio...nda+kovic-skow
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Old Mar 2nd, 2016, 08:04 PM
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My BIL wrote one about restoring a mill in SW France.

Turn Mill, Turn, by Alan J. Yates

http://www.amazon.com/Turn-Mill-Atte...=alan+j.+yates
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Old Mar 3rd, 2016, 03:33 AM
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The French House by Don Wallace.

When Francophiles Don and Mindy Wallace received an offer for a house on a tiny French island, they jumped at the chance, buying it almost sight unseen. What they found when they arrived was a building in ruin, and it wasn't long before their lives resembled it. Plagued by emergency repairs, a stock market crash, and very exasperated French neighbors, the Wallace's could have accepted their fate. Instead, they embraced it. The French House is the delightfully amusing and picturesque memoir about a family who seized life, rose from the rubble, and built themselves a home away from home.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2016, 04:40 AM
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I'd be curious to know what people get out of these books. I mean, I have 700+ pages of writings about owning a house in the SW of France, and I can't imagine anyone finding it particularly "useful," except in the realm of fantasy. And before I bought my house here and moved here, I sure didn't find Peter Mayle or any other writers of these sorts of books role models for what to do. They're fun to read, to be sure, but apart from that?? '
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Old Mar 3rd, 2016, 05:26 AM
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St Cirq,

Some people have imagination, and the ability to enter another's life imaginatively. Some people, like yourself don't. One's not better than another. Just different types of people. Spend less time trying to put down people whom you don't understand.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2016, 05:28 AM
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(It must have been a great asset as a copyeditor not to get caught up in stories you were copyediting so you could focus on the commas, etc. People have different talents and all are useful.)
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Old Mar 3rd, 2016, 06:03 AM
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Sandralist, you are a useless person. I have plenty of imagination and plenty of good writing behind me and plenty of clients who have paid me for that. Not to mention plenty of clients who have benefited from my use of commas, other puncutation, and good grammar. Your comments are utterly useless, off-base, groundless, and because you don't know me or any of my clients, you have no basis for making any criticism, which seems to be the hallmark of your existence. I fail to see why you can't just take some solace in living a nice life in Italy and instead spend you time being the wicked witch that you are. It's really hard to imagine any expat living in Europe being so hard-hearted and nasty and critical of anyone else's expertise. You are a basket case.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2016, 08:52 AM
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Amen.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2016, 02:52 PM
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Avalon, the two gents you mentioned are friends of mine.
My late husband and I visited at their home in the Loire.
We stayed nearby at a goat farm. I bought cheese there to bring to my friends who live in a village near Potiers. They thought it the best chevre that have .
ried.
The "hedgehog" was made into a good film. I still cried.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2016, 02:52 PM
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We love travelling to France , and as a consequence, I have acquired a large collection of books about France. I agree. Some are infinitely better than others. My collection is more than a lot of books about the generic renovation of a chateau/barn/farmhouse . I have memoirs of people who grew up in France, cookbooks which are part memoir , part recipes, travelogues by people who have walked, driven or cycled in France. Some are just pleasant to read and some are more informative.
I especially enjoy reading ones set in places we have visited or are planning to visit.As an example, I enjoyed reading Pierre Koffmann's "Memories of Gascony " which told of summers spent on his grandparents' farm in the Gers before we later visited the region. I have recently read "Tales from a Hilltop" by Tony Lewis which tells of a summer in Cordes sur Ciel conducting walking and bike tours. It was amusing and informative and told some of the history of the villages as well as describing the region. We will be staying in the region later this year. One of my favourites is Emilie Carles' book about growing up in the Claree valley near Briancon and I enjoyed being able to visit the valley she worked to save. I have a host of similar examples from previous trips.
So I suppose I read these books for a variety of reasons. Fun and relaxation, information, interest in what someone else has done, and to be transported for a brief time back to a place we love to visit.
Happy reading.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2016, 03:06 PM
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I forgot to add John Lancaster's wickedly funny, A Debt to Pleasure.

A favorite MKFsher book is THe Boss Dog, takes place in Avignon.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2016, 03:09 PM
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I read some books from Claude Michelet. I loved La Grande Muraille Most of hi books take place in Provence.
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