Beer

Oct 11th, 2011, 02:09 PM
  #41  
 
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"Beer in the UK is obviously the best in the world and I mean beer or ale, not lager or whatever bud is made from.

Our regional beers here in Lancashire and Yorkshire are many"

Lifeman is clearly too young to remember Bent's. Living proof (the taste still repeats on me, 40-odd years after my last pint of the muck) that it's possible for real beer to tick all the CAMRA boxes, come from Liverpool (back then, still unfortunate enough to be in Lancashire) and be utterly undrinkable.
flanneruk is offline  
Oct 11th, 2011, 02:10 PM
  #42  
 
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The strange thing is that when lager started to become popular in the 60's, it was regarded as a woman's drink.
Hooameye is offline  
Oct 11th, 2011, 02:32 PM
  #43  
 
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The term 'lager' is being bandied about here in a way which does an injustice to the genuine item.

The tasteless, gaseous, nauseous, noxious mixtures of chemicals served ice cold from fonts labelled 'lager' are, it is true, abominations which should be avoided like the plague but just as there is real ale there is also real lager.

Lager is brewed using bottom-fermenting yeast (as opposed to beer's top-fermentation) and special hops. It is then lagered (stored) at low temperature until ready. Look out for Harviestoun Schiehallion, Sulwath Galloway Gold and others. As with any beer it is a matter of personal taste, but real cask-conditioned lager can be excellent.
wasleys is offline  
Oct 11th, 2011, 02:38 PM
  #44  
 
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Sorry, I got me top and bottom mixed up.
wasleys is offline  
Oct 11th, 2011, 02:42 PM
  #45  
 
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No I didn't. I'm going to bed.
wasleys is offline  
Oct 11th, 2011, 07:24 PM
  #46  
 
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We enjoyed all the ales we tried in the UK.

This thread makes me miss C_W all over again, and I have nothing to toast him with.

Lee Ann
ElendilPickle is offline  
Oct 11th, 2011, 08:23 PM
  #47  
 
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"It would be bottled ale anyway if it's at home."

Not in our part of the world, I'm thrilled to say. Our neighbourhood microbrewery happily fills "flagons" (the modern equivalent of the old Kiwi "half-G" or half-gallon jar) for you to take home. Ah, nectar! To sup on a draught (tap-poured) Harrington's Wobbly Boot dark ale/porter in the comfort of one's own lounge while watching the Rugby World Cup quarter-finals is about as good as it gets!
twoflower is offline  
Oct 12th, 2011, 01:20 AM
  #48  
 
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As long as your team haven't been on the Wobbly Boot, that is.
PatrickLondon is online now  
Oct 12th, 2011, 04:12 AM
  #49  
 
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Is it still the practice in parts of Britain for people to take their own jug to the off-licence and have it filled with draught beer?

To the best of my knowledge, it was never done in the south of England, and it was a surprise to see the practice in the midlands in the 1960s.
chartley is offline  
Oct 12th, 2011, 09:37 AM
  #50  
 
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"Lifeman is clearly too young to remember Bent's". flanner, you say the nicest things, but I wouldn't remember local breweries in Liverpool in the 60's anyway, not one of my destinations.

However I do know what you mean when I think of John Willie Lees and Holts breweries. Both are still made somehow, but they produce the most fearful rubbish.

chartley, I've not seen the jug thing for donkey's years. That was in the days when off licences had barrels behind the counter, but not any more. However someone is bound to say that you can still get it from a microbrewery with a retail shop.
Lifeman is offline  
Oct 12th, 2011, 09:45 AM
  #51  
 
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>>Is it still the practice in parts of Britain for people to take their own jug to the off-licence and have it filled with draught beer?<<

I thought all that would have died out in the 1930s. Who lives within walking distance of an offie these days? Who'd walk through the streets with an open jug of anything? Who'd leave buying beer for home consumption until the moment they want to drink it?

I'd guess there are H&S rules against it now anyway, but surely simple commercial pressures from chain HQ on storage space, staff training and the like would have killed that idea anyway.
PatrickLondon is online now  
Oct 12th, 2011, 09:46 AM
  #52  
 
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I meant, of course, an old-fashioned specialist offie. Plenty of corner shops stock drink, but of course pre-packed like everything else they sell.
PatrickLondon is online now  
Oct 12th, 2011, 12:15 PM
  #53  
 
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Lifeman

I don't know if you cross the border into Yorkshire but have you tried any of the http://www.markettowntaverns.co.uk/ ?

If you check their website they sell "LIEFMANS KRIEK or LIEFMANS FRAMBOZEN", somehow I thought of you

We've been to the Symposium in Idle (insert the old, old joke about (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idle_Working_Men's_Club ) and found barstaff that really know their beer.
alya is offline  
Oct 12th, 2011, 01:10 PM
  #54  
 
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Re draught at beer-offs (as they were always known in this part of Lincolnshire) see:

http://www.archerroadbeerstop.com/

I suspect screw-top containers rather than jugs are now used for homeward transport.
wasleys is offline  
Oct 12th, 2011, 01:21 PM
  #55  
 
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Here in middle Michigan the micro breweries sell in half gallon brown glass jugs. You can bring your own or buy a jug from the pub. It is drawn from the tap. The screw cap is sealed with heat shrink plastic so it is legal to bring it home in your car.
spaarne is offline  
Oct 12th, 2011, 11:41 PM
  #56  
 
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>>We've been to the Symposium in Idle (insert the old, old joke about (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idle_Working_Men's_Club ) <<

Ah, but have you been in touch with the Loose Women's Institute:
http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=36541
PatrickLondon is online now  
Oct 13th, 2011, 12:16 AM
  #57  
 
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"I'd guess there are H&S rules against it now anyway, but surely simple commercial pressures from chain HQ on storage space, staff training and the like would have killed that idea anyway"

Oddly, not.

In my microtown, pretty much the only beer any pub sells is proper, gas-free, short-life, room-temperature draught. They all also stock two-pint containers that look like mega milk cartons.

Anyone wanting beer for dinner just goes to the handiest pub, orders a two-pinter of whatever takes their fancy, watches it get filled, slides a plastic sealer on it and takes it home. The wine-adverse usually take a couple with them when invited out to supper elsewhere in case the hosts buy crap beer or chill it below an acceptable temp. Some more generous hosts stock up on a few before any entertaining, even though the local Co-op has a great range of bottled real beer.

The containers are obviously designed for beer, and are commercially (and professionally) produced. Admittedly, we're kind of CAMRA Central round here (our town beer festival is probably our social highlight) - but we're far from unique in modernising the carry-out system.
flanneruk is offline  
Oct 13th, 2011, 12:18 AM
  #58  
 
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"I don't know if you cross the border into Yorkshire".

alya I do it every day. Although I live in East Lancashire my office is near Holmfirth. I travel around most of West Yorkshire to see clients and sometimes as far up as Harrogate and Knaresborough, so I know most of the locations that your link goes to. It's difficult to sample their wares though when having to drive back.
Lifeman is offline  
Oct 13th, 2011, 01:11 AM
  #59  
 
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What I recall is people going to the off sales part of a pub (or to a separate off licence) carrying a glass jug which they had filled. There was no lid in those days. In fact, the off sales part of a pub, which usually had a separate entrance to the bar and had a very small counter, was sometimes known as the "Jug and bottle".

The other thing I have not seen for many years, perhaps because I now move in different circles, is spirits sold on draught. These were not known brands, and I wonder who produced them.

Moving in circles reminds me of the old joke. "Mum, why can i only walk in circles?" "Shut up, or I'll nail your other foot to the floor".
chartley is offline  
Oct 13th, 2011, 01:22 AM
  #60  
 
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Lifeman on Oct 13, 11 at 4:18am
It's difficult to sample their wares though when having to drive back.

Darn - that sucks but I admire your restraint.
alya is offline  

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