Barcelona: A New Peril

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Jun 21st, 2007, 09:48 AM
  #1
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Barcelona: A New Peril

Interesting NPR report yesterday on Barcelona's experiementation with providing free bikes for folks to use for short journeys and the havoc it's causing on pedestrians on sidewalks - who now have to worry not only about getting mugged in Europe's street crime capital (along with madrid) but now getting run over by a bike!

The program, similar to one in Lyon and one to be launched imminently in Paris, has bikes parked all over town that folks with a chip card can use and return to other racks placed throughout the city.

50,000 people so far have paid $10 for a year of using the ubiquitous red-and-white bikes - which are free for the first 30 mins but charge after that.

The report said that many bikers, frightened over Barcelona's terribly busy wide roads have fled to the sidewalk en masse and there have been many complaints from pedestrians, who it seem yell and even swear at some of the impolite sidewalk bikers. One older lady said she was nearly knocked down.

I wonder if the bikes can be used by tourists or only residents? In Florence this year i saw bikes that were free to use for anyone. In Germany DB (railways) have bikes all around towns as well that can be used by anyone i believe (but these are not free but rather pricey)

hopefully some day soon it seems tourists will be able to hop bikes around bike-friendly towns.

Amsterdam, several years ago, had a similar scheme and ended it after most of the bikes soon disappeared.
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Jun 21st, 2007, 10:06 AM
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We were there a couple weeks ago and I saw a bike rental station. It looked to me like everyone was participating from tourists to residents.

We didn't have any problems in Barcelona but their "walk" lights at intersections are frightfully short.
Literally they start blinking and two seconds later the light turns green. You can get a good 3-4 minutes in Manhattan after the blinking starts.
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Jun 21st, 2007, 10:07 AM
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You will probably run a greater risk of being run over by a bike, or having one run a red light, etc. in the US than you would almost anywhere in Europe, IMO.

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Jun 21st, 2007, 10:10 AM
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dukey i guess you've never been to Amsterdam - i wonder how many tourists get hit by bikes when they wander unbeknown to them into the Fiets only lanes.

I've been to Amsterdam maybe 100 times and even led bike tours into and out of the city and know all about the bike lanes but still today find myself inadvertently walking in them and getting the often vehement approbation of bikers and have had several close calls with speeding bikers.

Less familiar Amsterdam tourists must have much more.
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Jun 21st, 2007, 10:19 AM
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>.. know all about the bike lanes but still today find myself inadvertently walking in them ...<

Same thing in Munich.

I stay to the right on sidewalks. That's the bike lane.

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Jun 22nd, 2007, 01:42 AM
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Haha that's ridiculous. just another example of how these reports put a spin on things.
"Havoc" "frightened" "fled"-
It's funny because if you weren't here, it'd make you imagine thousands of crazy cyclists knocking people over etc.

I'm sorry but I just haven't noticed a difference, apart from people being on a red bike more often than their own, or a car.
If there is a slight rise in the number of cyclists (but I stress an unnoticeable one) then this should be seen as a positive thing for the environment, personal health, mental health.. etc.

Put it into perspective please! How fewer people are on the metro or taking their car or taxis.


1. Barcelona city centre is extremely well-laid out with cycle routes and Barcelona cyclists are used to the city's traffic anyway.
These are not first-time-ever cyclists who decide to register. Rather those who don't want to worry about their bike being safely locked up outside.

2. You have to pay with a credit card to get onto this system, therefore it's unlikely to be used by tourists. This is like a year contract thing, extra or later than half an hour journeys get billed to your card, as does the following year's registration fee, unless you cancel in advance.
I think the credit card scheme also avoids people permanently "forgetting to put back" the bike.

And what's with this: "who now have to worry not only about getting mugged in Europe's street crime capital"...

Yes I walk around every day in Barcelona worrying that I'm going to get mugged. Or run over by a bike.
PalenQ ARE YOU SENSIBLE??
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Jun 22nd, 2007, 02:17 AM
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In collisions between cyclists and pedestrians, the cyclist usually comes off worse.(hence helmets)
Pavement cycling is an annoyance in the UK and, lets face it, rude.
Doesn't seem to happen in Amsterdam - is this because of the cycle lanes or because of the Dutch?
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Jun 22nd, 2007, 08:22 AM
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<Yes I walk around every day in Barcelona worrying that I'm going to get mugged. Or run over by a bike.>
PalenQ ARE YOU SENSIBLE??

travel buzzing - i doubt if you really live in Barcelona to say that - well bikes i don't know about but crime is rife and scandalous to me

Read the following, including some by longtime residents of Barcelona who confirm what i say -

Sounds like you are sensible NOT





Author: PalenQ
Date: 03/01/2007, 11:40 am
Be prepared for street crime - perhaps the worst city in Europe, along with Madrid, for muggings and bag snatching. There have been posts on this topic here and many report being victimized. Many.
So if you know the problem exists then you probably can avoid it.
A relative of mine was mugged in Madrid recently and got bruised.
As has been mentioned before in posts, pickpocketing is an issue - so be careful! I was almost mugged by a young boy (no joke, he was 8) on Las Ramblas.







Author: PalenQ
Date: 03/01/2007, 08:24 pm
There have been numerous posts on Fodor's about folks being victimized in Barcelona and Madrid. I'll copy some of these.

No it's really kind of silly to say all that have not been victimized on one side and those who have on the other.

No not nearly 50% of tourists here are victimized. But the occurence seems to be shockingly high for Europe.

The chances of your being victimized are relatively low - and a whole lot lower if you know the extent of the problem.

Author: nessundorma
Date: 08/20/2006
My husband had his pocket picked in the train station at the Plaza d'Espagne in Barcelona.

When I was walking with my husband down an alley in the Barri Gotico in Barcelona, a young man sneaked up behind me and grabbed the rather large nylon sack/bag I was holding in one hand. I so startled, I simply hung onto it, and then I screamed at the top of my lungs, at which point he let go and ran away.

Since that time I have not carried a purse anywhere I travel. I keep my unimporant items in an ordinary plastic shopping bag. I keep money and a credit card in a small zippered coin purse that straps over my wrist and has a ring loop that slides over my middle finger. It's called a Yazzy Sport bag.

In Madrid, my husband and I were walking near the Prado, on our way to Retiro Park, when we were approached by a young man carrying a map who asked us to help him find the Prado. We were trying to show him, using his map, when we were suddenly approached by a much older man who flashed a "Polizia" badge and demanded to see our passports. We began to explain that our passports were in our hotel safe, when I suddenly realized it was a scam. I firmly grabbed my husband's arm, announced it was a scam, and headed straight for a nearby group of construction workers. The two guys disappeared.

Because of my negative experiences, I tend to view Barcelona and Madrid as more risky than other places. I would ask your hotel desk to circle on a map any neighborhoods that are not advisable. I would avoid wearing jewelry, and if you stay out late drinking or wind up tipsy, get a cab.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I'd go again in a New York minute, despite the fact that my sister was robbed of her purse in an outdoor restaurant by a nice young man whom we had taken to be a waiter--as he obviously planned.

Fortunately, she had given me her credit card and passport to put in my money belt....

Author: Mary_Fran
Date: 03/02/2007, 01:20 am
I'm PegontheRoad's sister, and it was my purse that was swiped from my lap by a stealth thief as we sat at a table at an outside restaurant, with no one else around but a young man who approached our table as if he were a waiter. Only after he disappeared around the corner of the building too quickly did I think to check for my purse, which he'd lifted without my even noticing it. Barcelona is well known for its thriving pickpocket culture, and having been a very cautious victim of a thief, it annoys me wheen people drag up the same old defenses that it's no worse than any place else. It IS worse.


Author: PalenQ
Date: 03/02/2007, 10:07 am
Barcelona Pickpockets Real Life StoriesCar Crime In Barcelona - What you need to know if you intend driving a car in Barcelona · Passport Safety - tips to keep your passport safe ...
http://www.barcelona-tourist-guide.c...ckpockets.html - 29k - Cached - Similar pages

How To Beat Car Crime in BarcelonaReal life stories of car and motor crime in
Seems Barcelona's tourist office is so concerned about the city's spate of street crime it has to issue special warnings.

No more problem here than in other European cities...i think not and such comments only create a false sense of security that can lead to one being victimized. Realize the extent of the problem and the probability of being vitimized goes down due to increases alertness.
Should you become totally paranoid - no but just realize that there are problems - probably won't be targeted but chance is much much much more than most European cities.

Barcelona with some safety tips to help you have a safe visit when driving in Barcelona.
http://www.barcelona-tourist-guide.c...fety-tips.html





Author: laclaire
Date: 01/19/2007
I debated about posting this, but here goes. Consider it a case study of petty crime in Barcelona.

Last night I went to one of the VIP Bread and Butter (Barcelona's fashiion week) parties, and for it I wore black high heeled, knee-high boots, a retro dress (high neck, long sleeves, to just above my knees) and my black leather jacket (these details are important) that was just longer than the dress. I spent my last 7€ on the cab to get there (I had not been planning on going out), got my wrist stamped and had a wonderful night, which ended around 4 a.m.

I have walked home (a very safe area in the Eixample) a million times, and at all hours. The difference here is that I am normally in business attire or casual jeans and a top.

Mistake #1: single female dressed rather seductively walking anywhere alone at 4 a.m.

I decided to take advantage of the time difference and the walk home to call my mother.

Mistakes #2 and 3: talking on a cell phone that late (means you are not paying attention) and in English (meaning to everyone that you are super foreign and thus, a target)

I was walking along chatting with Mom and saw a guy on my side of the sidewalk. Normally, I would have crossed the street to avoid him, but I was literally right in front of my building, so I just kept walking.

Mistake #4: going against my better judgement to avoid the only guy on a lonely street.

I stopped to tell my mother I was going inside and would lose coverage.

Mistake #5: stopping for longer than it takes to open the door. Moving targets are not appealing.

While saying goodbye, the guy came up behind me, grabbed the bottom of my dress/coat and lifted it up to my waist. I have never screamed so loud in my life and he ran, but slowed to a walk a few yards away muttering something. That is when the most impressive stream of Spanish curses flowed out of my mouth, which stopped him dead in his tracks. And that is when I took chase, all the while screaming horrible things like "pedophile, assassin, you killed him!," and anything that i thought would make others want to chase and hurt him. Unfortunately, the streets were empty.

When I finally gave up the chase (high heels), I looked in my hand and saw my phone was still open. Mom had heard everything and was panicking. I explained and then said "I'll call you tomorrow," hung up and walked back home.

What have I learned? To practice what I preach, no matter what the situation.

Walking home at night is OK depending on your clothing and ability to get out of a weird situation (ie, if you can't run, take a cab), but if you don't met those requirements, don't do it, even if you have to borrow money. Women, this is especially true.

Do not walk and talk on a cell phone (in any language, really) late at night. You look unaware.

Empty street except for one guy and he is on your side? Cross the street no matter how close to your destination you are.

He did not steal anything, nor did he touch/harm any part of my body, but I woke up this morning with an intense feeling of upset. Does he live in my neighborhood? What if I had not been loud/strong/angry enough to react how I did? What could have happened?

This is not to scare people off of Barcelona. This is to say that no matter how long you have been here (or any city, for that matter) and how safe and savvy you feel, you must obey the basic rules of self preservation at all times. Even if it is fashion week.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This Fodor post by a Barcelona resident sums up my position - street crime is rife in Barcelona but by following common sense tips below it can be avoided probably. The poster got ripped off, once violently hurting her shoulder, because of her lack of knowledge of the problem - a sitting duck. I think she/he gives excellent advice for Barcelona.

Author: laclaire
Date: 09/01/2006
I now live in Barcelona and am very good at not getting mugged, but was not when I visited when I was younger. Once my wallet was stolen from my backpack while going up the stairs of the Sagrada Familia, and the second time my lovely new leather purse (which I was wearing for the first time) was ripped off my shoulder, leaving me with a strap burn on my neck and the strap in my hand, chasing the guy down the street yelling "hijo de puta." And once my cell phone got stolen, but that is another story.

Anyways, in those cases I was unaware of my surroundings. I had my wallet in the front pocket of my backpack. That is stupid. Then the purse thing, well, I heard running steps before it was ripped from my shoulder, and did not think to grab my stuff, which is now a reaction for me when I hear running. The cell phone, well, I was reading my e-mail, answered it, and then put it in my jacket pocket, which was hanging on my chair. Again, really dumb. I am not saying those things were my fault, but I am now much more aware and can tell when something is about to happen. So, here you have my list of how not to get robbed:
1) if taking the metro, use the stairs, not the escalators. I have never once heard of anyone getting robbed going up or down the stairs whereas most metro theft happens on the escalators.
2) in crowded spaces (metro, clubs, Ramblas, etc), hold your bag with both hands in front of you.
3) never go down streets unless you see women (prostitutes do not count on this one) and children. That is especially helpful at night. Also, if you see a street with just a few men, avoid it (especially in downtown BCN) because oftentimes they get you in there and work as a team. Ihave observed this from a friend's balcony numerous times.
4) Don't carry your valuables where people can see them. I actually say don't carry valuables period.
5) Trust no one.
6) If you feel a bad vibe, move away from it. I have been walking down a street and seen someone coming towards me that I thought was "off" and have turned right around and left, or run ahead to a group of people I didn't know but felt were not sketchy and walked close to them. Safety in numbers.
7) feel free to racial prifile your way through the city. I don't mean to sound crude, and frankly, every group in the world has robbers, but after numerous attempts at being PC and getting screwed, I won't even speak to random members of certain ethnic groups. In fact, I was dating a guy from one of those groups and he was the one who told me that if one of his compatriots walks up to me and asks for a light/cigarette/the time/etc, it is because I am going to get mugged.

I guarantee you that if you say there were not even any close calls, you simply were not paying attention. These people are professionals and they are very good at what they do. I have seen some robberies that were very impressive and once a friend and I were at a table and she got robbed and neither of us noticed (her bag was between her feet under the table and somehow the thief got under there and cut the strap. . . WTF?!).

Yes, December is a slow month, but everyone's gotta eat no matter what, and if that is what puts food on the table, they need you to be there.



: Dukey
Date: 08/20/2006
The "crime" I've personally experienced in Barcelona consisted of being pickpocketed on the Metro.

Author: nessundorma
Date: 08/20/2006
My husband had his pocket picked in the train station at the Plaza d'Espagne in Barcelona.

When I was walking with my husband down an alley in the Barri Gotico in Barcelona, a young man sneaked up behind me and grabbed the rather large nylon sack/bag I was holding in one hand. I so startled, I simply hung onto it, and then I screamed at the top of my lungs, at which point he let go and ran away.

Since that time I have not carried a purse anywhere I travel. I keep my unimporant items in an ordinary plastic shopping bag. I keep money and a credit card in a small zippered coin purse that straps over my wrist and has a ring loop that slides over my middle finger. It's called a Yazzy Sport bag.

In Madrid, my husband and I were walking near the Prado, on our way to Retiro Park, when we were approached by a young man carrying a map who asked us to help him find the Prado. We were trying to show him, using his map, when we were suddenly approached by a much older man who flashed a "Polizia" badge and demanded to see our passports. We began to explain that our passports were in our hotel safe, when I suddenly realized it was a scam. I firmly grabbed my husband's arm, announced it was a scam, and headed straight for a nearby group of construction workers. The two guys disappeared.

Because of my negative experiences, I tend to view Barcelona and Madrid as more risky than other places. I would ask your hotel desk to circle on a map any neighborhoods that are not advisable. I would avoid wearing jewelry, and if you stay out late drinking or wind up tipsy, get a cab.



Author: missypie
Date: 03/02/2007, 10:58 am


Author: lincasanova
Date: 03/02/2007, 12:32 pm
please pay heed to the considerate warnings you are gettng from some first hand experienced travellers and RESIDENTS.

I am meeting a journalist tomorrow who will be on her own tonight in downtown Valencia.

she intends to go for a stroll around the old town, etc.

my first words of advice were exactly what you have been told.

beware,.. but do enjoy yourself!

i think it is difficult for some of you to understand that there is an entire subculture of professional thieves who have a mission every single day and minute of the year. they LOOK for prey.

i have seen it in action. believe me.
i have seen barcelona and madrid VIDEOS filmed from hotel rooms of the kids/youth working the crowds.

but FORTUNATELY i have never been robbed in 35 years... however.. I doubt i will be able to go another 35 with that track record.

a very lax judicial system has helped propogate an unusual amount of petty crime in this country.

enjoy your trip.

and i wouldn´t call it negativism.. just a touch of reality. i work with students and foreign expats daily and i can tell you, it is unreal.

just ask your local consulate how many reports they do a week.

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Jun 22nd, 2007, 08:49 AM
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Thanks for the warning PalenQ.
My recent experience with Spain was not favorable and your 'reposting of all the crimes' convinced me not to return. I can't imagine what Barcelona is like now with all those crazy cyclists and criminals. I've read so many of your posting PalenQ, you seem to be the Fodorite reporter type bringing updates from NPR and what have you. It's good to warn unsuspecting dumb tourists before they make their travel plans.
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Jun 22nd, 2007, 08:54 AM
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PalenQ you obviously didnt get my point. of course people get robbed and mugged here, I have heard many a story about it.
This does not mean that people should be walking about, fearing for their safety, as you said "worrying" about getting robbed
.
The report suggesting that Barcelona now has a huge problem with careless cyclists is completely ridiculous.
Yes i do live here, you can doubt that as much as you like.
Telling you exactly what I thought of the bicing situation and that stupid report surely demostrates that.

"""This Fodor post by a Barcelona resident sums up my position - street crime is rife in Barcelona".. "- a sitting duck. I think she/he gives excellent advice for Barcelona."""

Funny enough, I actually know leclaire. she is no sitting duck i assure you.
I would love to see you tell her that to her face.
She has told me that story before. Not online. here in BCN. Leclaire actually lives in Raval, which im sure avid fodorites will know is constantly being questioned as safe or unsafe.
The first time I came to Barcelona I was 19. I stayed for a month on my own, hostelling (Im female) and seeing the city. And now, an adult, I´ve been living here for nearly a year.

I know that there is pick-pocketing and this type of crime. A lot of thieves actually immigrate here for the summer season (gasp!).

I have never felt unsafe or in constant worry about getting mugged. Common sense is enough thanks.
Anyway, the bicing thing was MY POINT in the first place, complete spin from god-knows where.



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Jun 22nd, 2007, 09:03 AM
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<"""This Fodor post by a Barcelona resident sums up my position - street crime is rife in Barcelona".. "- a sitting duck. I think she/he gives excellent advice for Barcelona."""

well you are mistaken if i called her a sitting duck - that is not my quote and i'll go back to check - but be sure i did not say that about a Barcelona resident so i think that is simply not true"

I said the bike flap could be much ado about nothing and said that in my response - the crime situation i know is more, much more serious than anywhere else in Europe i've been. You don't get mugged many places in Europe.

But i did not label sitting duck and it must have been some other quote.
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Jun 22nd, 2007, 09:09 AM
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after reviewing i have to say i did label her that and that was because she herself said that when she first came to Barcelona she was so naive about the crime and that makes her a sitting duck - which is why i try to alert folks of the very real possibility there that if you are not cognizant that there appear to be many criminals eyeing up an easy target you indeed will be a sitting duck.

So i think she was calling herself a sitting duck - if you read her comments i'm sure you will agree.

And that's the point - i would tell tourists not to avoid this wonderful city but to be very aware - yes 'worried' about street crime as i believe then you can avoid much of it, much like your friend, in her words in her post said after she became aware of the problem.

I understand that locals often react like i'm attacking Barcelona and Barcelonians in general and thus don't take it lightly - this damn American telling us what Barcelona is like.

Well i'm telling tourists - sitting duck tourists if they are now aware of the problem - so they won't leave Barcelona with a bas taste.

And i suggest you read the warnings in the links from the BARCELONA TOURIST OFFICE that i posted.

Sometimes folks can't see the forest for the trees it seems
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Jun 22nd, 2007, 09:10 AM
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And I quote you, palenQ:
""This Fodor post by a Barcelona resident sums up my position - street crime is rife in Barcelona but by following common sense tips below it can be avoided probably. The poster got ripped off, once violently hurting her shoulder, because of her lack of knowledge of the problem - a sitting duck. I think she/he gives excellent advice for Barcelona."""

well then where o where did you get it from??

also to talk about the long term residents.
well they obviously just decided to put up with all the brutal muggings and robberies to themselves where they live!!! for so many years then eh? must be the sunshine.

"""You don't get mugged many places in Europe."""" hahaha! you are not sensible!

todor- haha you're funny

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Jun 22nd, 2007, 09:15 AM
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please reaad my next reply retracting that statement - i did call her that for the reasons i explained and i'm sure that she would agree as that was the thrust of her post - how naive she was when she first came to Barcelona - duh - isn't that a sitting duck? Duh?
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Jun 22nd, 2007, 09:15 AM
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ok so we just posted at the same time there. hey i dont see her saying "sitting duck" anywhere. what's more i can't see her saying that about herself, trust me. anyway haha
"you don't get mugged many places in europe"-
hahaha
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Jun 22nd, 2007, 09:16 AM
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haha sorry did it again
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Jun 22nd, 2007, 09:24 AM
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what sort of an argument is "duh" ?
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Jun 22nd, 2007, 09:27 AM
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i think she would in the context i pointed out - when she first arrove there - but honestly i do not want folks not to go to Barcelona, certainly one of my favorite cities, much nicer to me than Madrid, but just to realize there are dangers here.

I guess the fact my sister-in-law being so violently mugged in Madrid influences me to do so. And though you may well be pickpocketed or have a bag slashed or ripped off you in other places in Europe i think muggings are very very rare except in Spain. Sorry i could be wrong but i'm kind of on a crusade to alert folks of the dangers - if Barcelona/Madrid loses tourists dollars as they indeed must be because i'm not the only one posting these things, then they will decide to act on it and not have the revoling door of justice as i believe another Barcelona local put it.
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Jun 22nd, 2007, 09:41 AM
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BUT YOU POSTED ABOUT BIKES!
this thread was started by you about barcelona being even more dangerous (ahem) because of the "HAVOC" the new biking system has caused, and how it has "FRIGHTENED" bikers.
then this whole thing has been continued on another tangent by you about crime. We were talking about a stupid, non-existent issue of the new bicing in Barcelona.
tutt tutt.


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Jun 22nd, 2007, 09:56 AM
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yes and though the NPR report quoted several Barcelonans who said the bikes were causing havoc on sidewalks i seriously take your input as to this may not be the case and those other locals were wrong.

Or maybe it was overhyped but it did make it sound like a problem - this i don't know and i lend your observation on this matter great credence.
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