Andrea Bocelli and Italy!

Apr 29th, 2001, 12:47 PM
  #1  
Judy
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Andrea Bocelli and Italy!

Hello all, after a very lovely Italian dinner on Friday night, we came home and put on Andrea's "Romanza"(love it) cd, and were transported to Rome's Piazza Navonna, Venice, Florence and Italy in general.
My question: Is there any particular music that reminds you of your fave country(ies)?
I also like to listen to AF "on hold" music, who is that anyway?
Judy
 
Apr 29th, 2001, 12:52 PM
  #2  
xxx
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aren't you the one that also thinks a kool and the gang concert is worthy of luring visitors in from europe?
 
Apr 29th, 2001, 01:03 PM
  #3  
Judy
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That also included Bob Dylan and many other groups, not just Kool.... and by the way, you are the weakest link, goodbye! Judy, to you xxx
 
Apr 29th, 2001, 01:45 PM
  #4  
Mel
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Judy:
Ah, Andrea--my favorite!! I have all five of his CD's, but Romanza (his first in the US, I believe)is the one I've kept on my car player for the last four years--the only one that doesn't get rotated out! And, yes, it takes me back to Rome, but I'm passing the Spanish Steps at dusk... FYI, the other "must hear" is the London cast recording of Les Miserable. Have it memorized. I see the play whenever I'm in London (my husband's getting tired of it, but do I care? Apparently not!). Thanks for asking!
 
Apr 29th, 2001, 02:07 PM
  #5  
Capo
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One of my favorite CDs reminds me of my favorite city.

Who would have ever thought that the man who created, and managed, British punk-rock band The Sex Pistols, would have gone on to create such a marvelous musical love letter to the City of Light?

Entitled, simply, "Paris", McLaren's album is filled with sultry jazz-tinged numbers, such as "Walking With Satie", "Jazz Is Paris", and "Rue Dauphine", which he co-wrote (and sang), as well as a wonderful cover of Serge Gainsbourg's scandalous, and erotic, song "Je T'Aime...Moi Non Plus."

In addition to McLaren, the album features guest vocals by Françoise Hardy, Sonia Rykiel, and Catherine Deneuve. This is actually a 2-CD set, with the second CD being instrumental mixes of the songs.

If you love Paris, I can't recommend this enough!
 
Apr 29th, 2001, 02:11 PM
  #6  
Capo
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Ooops, sorry...that would be *Malcolm* McLaren.
 
Apr 29th, 2001, 02:42 PM
  #7  
wendy
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Thanks for the music ideas!

There are some songs tied to a country that naturally bring back the memories, but
 
Apr 29th, 2001, 02:53 PM
  #8  
wendy
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I hit the send too quick...
I was going to say that they are times when I hear a song on the radio or on a CD from here, that doesn't stand out then, but when I hear it again here, it takes me back. We drove through South Africa listening to Jackson Browne, and I can still 'see' the countryside as we rode along...on the other hand, a South African folk hero Johnny Clegg played alot too, and I can still feel like I'm there when I hear it...

Music is very powerful isn't it?
 
Apr 29th, 2001, 03:14 PM
  #9  
ger
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Judy:

Nice post, thanks ... music that squeezes my heart and makes me remember ....

Paris: Anything by Edith Piaf and, for some reason, Ravel's Belero
Ireland: Sean O'Riordan's "Mise Eire" (serious tear-jerker), Christy Moore, Clannad, Planxty,
English countryside: Elgar
The Great Cathedrals anywhere: Handel's Messiah, Benjamin's Britten's "Ceremony of Carols", Ave Maria, Ave Verum, Jesu Joy as sung by the great Kiri
Italy: Vivaldi's Four Seasons

Capo: thanks for the recommendation - its on my shopping list. I would never have thought of picking it up as I have always thought MM a complete tosser. (GAWD ... "je t'aime" ... memories of my pals & I trying to translate the lyrics and being COMPLETELY confused ...).

Regards ... Ger
 
Apr 29th, 2001, 03:17 PM
  #10  
ger
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oooppppsss

should read Sean O'Riada and I would recommend anyone travelling to Ireland to listen to it.
 
Apr 29th, 2001, 04:05 PM
  #11  
John
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Cinema Paradiso! A beautiful movie and sound track!

JOHN
 
Apr 29th, 2001, 04:10 PM
  #12  
Amy
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Traditional Irish music is the most evocative of the place for me. To me, even Irish speaking is musical, and I just associate music with Ireland.
Even Handel's Messiah now has an Irish connection for me: St. Michan's church (where the Crusader mummy is so nicely preserved) is where he practiced before the Dublin debut.
(Let's not mention the Swiss yodeling/alpenhorn tape. I just got that for educational purposes.)
 
Apr 29th, 2001, 04:11 PM
  #13  
Judy
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Capo: sounds like I would love it, I will have to check it out.
Ger, we are going to Ireland in August, Sean O'Riada's Mise Eire seems just the thing to get me in the mood. I also have " There was a Lady" a collection of Celtic women singers with Karen Matheson.... for my Ireland/Scotland visit.
Mel: I have 2 other Andrea's albums, but Romanza is my favorite too!
Wendy: I agree with you, music is extremely powerful....and universal.
Judy
 
Apr 29th, 2001, 11:06 PM
  #14  
martha
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It's not Andrea B., but I would highly recommend the new CD, Neopolitan Cafe, from the Canadian group Quartetto Gelato. I am preparing for my trip to Italy with it. You'll hear familiar (Volare) and unfamiliar compositions by this talented group of violin, cello, oboe and accordion...with some tenor vocals. You can read about the group and their CDs by going to their Web site.
 
Apr 30th, 2001, 11:25 AM
  #15  
Capo
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Ger & Judy, glad I piqued your interest in McLaren's "Paris." Whenever I put it on and close my eyes, I can envision myself back there. (Note: as I alluded to, some of the lyrics are rather blue -- or, make that bleu -- so, if you're easily offended, probably best to skip it.)

Oh, and Ger, re: "I have always thought MM a complete tosser."

Well, I understand that; I've listened to a couple of his other CDs and don't care for them. "Paris" is very different. I'd read that he'd been intrigued by Paris, and jazz, ever since he was very young and, with "Paris", wanted to compose -- as I noted above -- a musical "love letter" to the city.

Wendy, I've loved the music of Johnny Clegg ever since I first heard his song "Asimbonanga" (from the album Shadow Man) on a sampler CD. He puts on an electric live show; when I saw him & his band Savuka a few years ago in a theater, the audience rose to their feet during the first song and remained standing -- and dancing in place -- during the entire show. I also always loved the fact that his bands were multi-racial, coming as they did, from a racially-divided country (Clegg learned to play music from older Zulus in South African townships.)


Another piece of music that's every evocative for me is Mark Knopfler's soundtrack to the movie "Local Hero", set in Scotland.
 
Apr 30th, 2001, 01:00 PM
  #16  
wendy
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Capo,

Isn't he amazing!?

I spent two years in South Africa, and one of my dearest friends was a lawyer who represented individuals in some of the poorest townships, I went a lot with her and we also did some hiking in the bush with some Zulu tribe members... it was a life changing and deeply moving expereince. Needless to say this music brings it back every time. It is very moving music and 'Asimbonanga' has always been a favorite! Where did you see them? Do you have the CD African Dream? I highly recommend it. Glad to know someone else knows it!

Wendy
 
Apr 30th, 2001, 03:47 PM
  #17  
Capo
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Wendy, yes, very amazing! His music and energy are tremendously uplifting. Glad to hear that "Asimbonanga" is a favorite of yours too. I believe I have almost everything he has put out, with either Savuka or Juluka ("African Dream" is the greatest hits, isn't it?) I've seen them three times here in Seattle. He was supposed to be here again, two years ago, at the WOMAD (World of Music, Arts, and Dance) festival, but, unfortunately, canceled at the last moment.

Depending on how interested you are in his background, as well as his music, you might be interested in an excellent Rolling Stone article, entitled "Johnny Clegg's war on apartheid" by Samuel G. Friedman. It's the article that mentions how he learned to play music from the Zulus.

There are two versions: the original, in RS #574, 22 March 1990; pp. 58-65, 120, 122, and a revised one in RS #632, 11 June 1992; pp. 181, 183-185.


 
Apr 30th, 2001, 03:53 PM
  #18  
wendy
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Wow! You are a true music aficiando...
thank you, I'll have to get a backcopies. I've never seen him perform in the states, I wonder where he is now.

How do you know of him from Seattle?

'African Dream' is the name of the CD I have of his best...I could only choose one CD and that was it. I don't speak Afrikaans very well, but I know the CD by heart. When I taught school, my kids loved "Spirit of the Great Heart" and made me play it over and over...

Thank you for taking time to share what you know!

Wendy



 
Apr 30th, 2001, 04:07 PM
  #19  
my $.02
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CD: "Old Sicilian Songs" (anonymous traditional folk songs) sung by Simone Alaimo (a Sicilian-born opera singer who sometimes sings at the Met in NYC)
 
Apr 30th, 2001, 04:51 PM
  #20  
elvira
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Edith Piaf, Charles Aznavour and Maurice Chevalier take me to Paris immediately. There is something about Marian McPartland's style that also evokes Paris.

Keith Jarret's Koln Concert and Stephan Grapelli put me in that Continental state of mind.

The entire soundtrack from My Fair Lady makes me homesick for London (the one of my imagination, of course, but the real one comes pretty damn close).

 

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