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A very important question regarding pronunciation

A very important question regarding pronunciation

Old Dec 8th, 2017, 08:30 PM
  #1  
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A very important question regarding pronunciation

Mr. H. and I were recently arguing ( discussing ) the proper pronunciation of pastie. Especially for those from Cornwall, please let me know the correct way to pronounce it. Googling, I come up with two possibilities. Really?
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Old Dec 8th, 2017, 09:25 PM
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Are you talking about the strip show pronunciation?

(Never been to Cornwall.)
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Old Dec 8th, 2017, 10:05 PM
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If you mean as in Cornish pasties (proper spelling singular is pasty, not pastie) it's pronounced passtee. Disclaimer: I'm not from Cornwall but lived in UK.
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Old Dec 8th, 2017, 10:09 PM
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usually spelt pasty

always rhymes with nasty
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Old Dec 8th, 2017, 11:30 PM
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Thanks.I did realize I was referring to the plural form but really makes little difference. I had assumed you just added an 's' for sound and ' ies' in spelling the plural. So you have nasty pasties.
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Old Dec 8th, 2017, 11:31 PM
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Sofarsogood, your argument is flawed. As an Australian, i would pronounce nasty as narsty. But I would pronounce pastie as pastee.
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Old Dec 8th, 2017, 11:33 PM
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It doesn't rhyme with nasty where I come from. Nasty has an ah sound, pasty has a short a, certainly in the SE of England. Some people keep to that ah sound and turn it into pahstee, just as they say plahstic, but the vast majority say pasty.

Never a long pay-stee pronunciation. That is something else entirely.
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Old Dec 8th, 2017, 11:45 PM
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I was always brought up to use the same shortish vowel as in "hat". Lengthening it to an "ah" sound seems a bit la-di-da to me. Though to be fair, in YouTube videos there's a spectrum of vowel sounds

https://youtu.be/KwFUOsA5MEo

https://youtu.be/Q26uIXh6vkU

https://youtu.be/lU64WSjq0Ro

I only recently heard of the stripshow version but I'm assuming strippers use a paste-y. It would be a real novelty act that used the Cornish version instead.
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Old Dec 9th, 2017, 01:44 AM
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there are two pronunciations for "nasty" in the UK so recommending it as a solution is very funny

Paasty not Parsty
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Old Dec 9th, 2017, 04:44 AM
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This website isn't always correct, but seems to support hetismij2's pronunciation of nasty and pasty: http://howjsay.com
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Old Dec 9th, 2017, 05:19 AM
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how about calling someone a "pasty-faced pasty muncher"

you'll be arguing over the pronunciation of scone and grass!
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Old Dec 9th, 2017, 05:23 AM
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or even "a pasty-faced nasty pasty muncher"

someone who is a bit of a hard nut, doesn't see the sun a lot, and shops at Greggs

I would think the above will likely be lost in translation...
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Old Dec 9th, 2017, 08:50 AM
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ok. i think that I'm as well qualified as any here to give my opinion.

I agree that using nasty as a comparison is potentially misleading because of possible variations in pronunciation of the A. Indeed if I were to say "that's a nasty pasty" the As in nasty and pasty would not sound the same.

IMO Pat and Hets are right - it's pAsty as in Hat, with the stress on the A. The y is a standard y sound as in "likely", "possibly" or even "bigly".

There are some local variations, but that's only because of their way of pronouncing an A; it's not the "right" way to pronounce it unless you pronounce all short As that way.

BTW, the singular is "pasty", the plural "pasties" but the sound of the A remains the same.
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Old Dec 9th, 2017, 09:11 AM
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Pass T

There's no R in bath, nasty, pasty, latte.

God I hate that one.

"Can I get a lartte".

What is "can I get"

What is "lartte"

Bloody youth of today.

My father travelled the length and breadth of Cape Cod for two weeks wondering why he was asked whether he wanted "budder" with his scones.

He amswered twice that he was Church of England.
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Old Dec 9th, 2017, 09:15 AM
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Nothing to do with the pronunciation, but I think the word "nasty" truly describes the pasty. Having spent some time in Cornwall, and tried a variety of them, I would never willingly eat another. The shortbread crust is nice enough if the pasty is fresh from the oven, but the potato/swede/lard/hint of meat combination that is inside is simply horrid, IMHO.
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Old Dec 9th, 2017, 09:26 AM
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Nasty, pasty, hasty, tasty...

For a bit of festive fun, who can come up with the most amusing sentence using all these words?!!!!
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Old Dec 9th, 2017, 09:32 AM
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Nukesafe

You can't have had a good one.

They were designed by the wives of tin miners ( Ann correct me if I'm wrong( your heritage not mine)) to provide a full meal for their husbands when underground.

When cooked correctly with a right thickness of pastry, the lamb Cornish pasty is one of the worlds great dishes.

Produced badly, and yes, I wouldn't give it to my Working Cocker Spaniel.

Did you buy yours from our national chain : Greggs?
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Old Dec 9th, 2017, 09:38 AM
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Pasty is pronounced Pass Tea.

My Welsh grandmother made them.

Posh people wouldn't know how to pronounce pasty because the pasty was made for coalminer's tiffin pans.


Thin
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Old Dec 9th, 2017, 09:57 AM
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Those in Northern Michigan also know the name as many miners came to work the ore mines. You can still find them on menus around the state.
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Old Dec 9th, 2017, 10:11 AM
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>> even "a pasty-faced nasty pasty muncher"

someone who is a bit of a hard nut, doesn't see the sun a lot, and shops at Greggs
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