45 Minutes To See Prado

Old Feb 22nd, 2010, 08:56 PM
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Glad to see that there are 8 new responses not written by me.

Speaking of dogs, two dogs come to mind at the Prado. One is the one in Las Meninas, while the other one is the Goya on the 2nd Floor.

It's one painting that Miro reportedly wanted to see before he died.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dog_%28Goya%29
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Old Feb 22nd, 2010, 09:06 PM
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"I don't know why people assume that a short time has to be rushed."

Well some people on Fodor's like to assume a lot of things.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 01:02 AM
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What to see in 1 hour according to the Museo del Prado website:
http://www.museodelprado.es/en/the-c...in-the-museum/
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 02:30 AM
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Despite a lot of attempts, it is useless for people here, or anywhere else for that matter, to try to REGIMENT the way OTHER people travel, but the fight continues and sometimes it is a lot of fun to blatantly IGNORE all the "advice" you get and do it your own way.

The last time I was in Amsterdam I went to the Rijksmuseum, as I usually do, went upstairs and stared at my favorite piece for about 30 minutes, and then left.

I did not feel cheated and for me it was time well-spent.

Thanks for the interesting and completely understandable link.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 03:08 AM
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Well, the galleries could at least put the best stuff by the front door...
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 04:32 AM
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I'm all for getting people out of museums in less than an hour, especially people with children who want them to shout every time they spot a dog in a painting.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 04:33 AM
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tDudette, EXACTLY! Or even out the door. Like the Mona Lisa. Then the tourists could just Segway by it.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 04:35 AM
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Dukey,

The Rijksmuseum has been closed for years. When were you there?
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 05:57 AM
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Growing up I was fortunate enough to live right near the Met in Manhattan, and went for frequent brief visits. Even now I like smaller "bites" of large museums because I get overwhelmed and can't really see much after the first hour or even less. So I understand not staying too long, but the tradeoff is only seeing the "biggies" and not getting a sense of the depth of some of the world's great collections. Travel always involves tradeoffs, especially for those of us who can't/don't travel often, so we make our choices. The key is developing our own idea of what really works for each of us.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 07:19 AM
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One of my more amusing travel moments was in a museum in Budapest. A group led by an English speaking guide without breaking stride or stopping and pointing with his umbrella at a painting said, "That is one I wanted to show you.">>

perhaps it's the one i remember from a museum in Budapest. a woman [not in the first flush of youth] is looking calmly out from the canvas, whilst her male companion embraces her and is winking at the audience. it is then you realise that he has the hand you can't see inside her dress!

when our kids were not much younger and we were in museums with them, they became fixated on the flying heads featured in so many paintings, and the ugliness of the babies depicted, so much so, that we started an ugly baby competition. the winner was a christ-child in Siena, I think. we never did work out why the some of the world's greatest artists were incapable of painting a realistic baby in proportion to itself and its mother.

i like the idea of spotting dogs too. i may borrow it if i ever have grandchidlren!
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 07:25 AM
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An ugly baby contest, why didn't I think of that? It would make all those galleries filled with religious paintings much more fun. I'll have to remember that if the occasion ever arises.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 08:14 AM
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primeranoche, that's a good mind picture-the segways passing the best stuff.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 09:16 AM
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Annhig

I must return to Budapest since I do not recall such a painting. But you may have inadvertedly come up with an idea for adults.

Instead of challenging children to find dogs and such in paintings, encourage adults to find nudes and representations of sexual moments. This may be the answer to counter the 45 minute museum trot.

I have also decided to turn off my radio any time they do not play one of my favorite tunes. Obviously there is little value in what I do not know.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 09:41 AM
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@ primeranoche -- it's a Museum, not a library or movie theatre -- things on view in museums should invoke passion, not simply non-verbal spiritual enlightenment. You're not sitting there trying to quietly figure out the meaning behind some existentialistic thought, or trying to stifle the interest or excitement of a young (or old) mind. Interaction is key!

@ questionqueen -- my son also loved (as we did!) the Parque del Retiro -- they have wonderful breezy little boat tours (or you can rent a boat!) on the little lake (great when it's hot), the Alfonso XII monument is fun to climb around, there's those big sucking fish (like koi, but I don't think that's what it is) to feed in the lake (they sell fish food!), there's a children's playground, sidewalk chalk painters, street performers and the like. And it's super close to the Prado.

He also loved the Puerto del Sol and the symbol of Madrid there -- the big statue of the bear and the berry tree (El Oso y El Madroño).
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 11:04 AM
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Seems to me there are all kinds of museum visitors. Those who enjoy long days viewing great art and those who what to see a few great works. There are also those who visit Paris or Florence often and don't need or want to see all of the great art each time. One size definitely does not fit all in this case.
If you love art and don't expect to return to a city soon, spen more time. After nearly a dozen visits to Paris, I usually pick a few favorites to see while I am there. Or visit a museum I've not seen before. I'm not sure it is necessary to "do a major museum justice" as long as you see what you want to see.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 11:18 AM
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Agree with mamcalice. We all have different tastes and different ideas of what we want to see or don't care about seeing. Also, if there's a particular exhibit at a museum -- the reason for going may be to just focus on the works in the exhibit, lingering longer on the works that interest me.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 12:53 PM
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Surfergirl,

I can't blame you for being so poorly educated given what museums have marketed themselves as to people like you in order to survive, but great artworks are about ideas -- subtle ideas -- that are much more difficult to grasp when people encourage their children to shout around them. They DO in fact represent existential ideas -- but I suspect you are already too old to be re-educated.

Just try to consider this despite your depressing ignorance: Other people who are genuinely passionate about art -- because they understand it from the inside -- often must save up their money and sacrifice tremendously to see the artworks in European museums you think your kid should be noisily interacting with. As you already know, there is a big park outside with sucking fish. Next time, have a little maturity and take your kid there to play, not inside a museum. And lest you fear for his precious development, I'll point out that (a) he won't grow up to rude in museums and (b) I have yet to meet a single serious artist or art lover whose parents didn''t teach him or her how to appreciate quiet looking in a museum and -- in fact -- nearly every artist I know was never taken to a museum by parents at all as a child.

Museums are not Burger King. "I'll just have it my way." Neither is art. It's stunning to me that so many people who claim to have spent so much time in museums seem not to have noticed art is placing demands on them. I blame it on teachers, frankly, who would probably get fired if they actually taught children the ideas present in art. But there's apparently little risk of that ever happening, so people can just go on believing art is another entertainment to fill up the boredom of their lives, like travel itself. And dog-spotting.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 01:07 PM
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Primeranoche, you say above that the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam has been closed for years. I just checked their web page and they appear to be open. Where did you get your information?

http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 01:21 PM
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The Rijksmuseum has been under renovation for several years now. On the link you provided, the visitor information page says:

"During the large - scale rebuilding of the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam till 2012/13, the finest works from the 17th century in the Rijksmuseum will continue to be on view under the title 'The Masterpieces'."

Other works are at Schiphol and other locations. None of them, as far as I know, have an "upstairs" - which is where Dukey tells us he was "last" time he went to the Rijksmuseum for 30 minutes with a favorite painting (little did he know he should have been talking to it or kissing it or sucking it or "interacting" in some fashion rather than just quietly looking at it as if it were a movie or book. Sheesh! What a dumbell. Maybe he should have just surfed past it. Or skated, I guess, this being Amsterdam.)
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Old Feb 23rd, 2010, 01:23 PM
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and more from the museum's website:

Open
Until the main building reopens, the Rijksmuseum will display its masterpieces from the Golden Age in the Philips Wing on the Museumplein square, in an exhibition entitled 'The Masterpieces'. The museum’s collection can be admired at the Rijksmuseum division based at Amsterdam-Schiphol airport, in museums in the Netherlands and abroad and on the Internet until 2013.
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