13 Glorious Autumn Days in Spain!

Old Feb 5th, 2020, 12:38 PM
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13 Glorious Autumn Days in Spain!

My husband and I took a 15 day trip to Spain, leaving Houston On October 30th 2019 and returning on November 13th. We spent four nights in Barcelona, two in Granada, three in Seville, one in Cordoba, and three in Madrid, with a day trip to Toledo. Friends have asked about my favorite place, and all I can say is that each was wonderful in its own way. The people, the sights, the hotels, the food were all winners! I hope you’ll join me as I reminisce about our adventure in Spain!

Just the Facts

We share a life-long love of travel, especially to Europe, but postponed it for graduate school, work, and rearing children except for two trips to England and Scotland (one of them with our children), one to Paris, and another to Switzerland. Our goal for our post-retirement years was to take a spring and a fall trip to Europe each year but this is the first year we’ve made it, although we did travel to Switzerland for 10 days in 2010, Italy for three weeks in 2014, and France for three-and-a-half in 2015. This past spring we spent 24 days driving through the hill towns of Tuscany, revisiting Rome, and cruising through Greece, Turkey, and Italy. This past summer I turned 70 (my husband is 72) and we realized that we needed to slow things down a bit and take shorter vacations. So as we began planning our time in Spain, we decided to limit it to two weeks. We wish we’d had another day on Granada and one more in Madrid but we were able to see and do the things that mattered to us most.

For those who are planning your own trip to Spain, I’ll share some information about the cost for two people of the various components of our travel. Here are the totals:

Airfare to Barcelona from Houston – $2042

Train Tickets, Alsa bus, Metro Tickets, Taxis, Sightseeing Bus - $533 (Some train & bus fares were at reduced senior rate)

Hotels & Apartment - $1868

Food - $588 We budgeted $75 per day but food was much cheaper than we expected. Our hotel in Barcelona included a 24-hour buffet and we ate most of our meals there. We typically ate breakfast and a late lunch or early dinner and took protein bars with us for a quick snack.

Admissions - $428 (Most admission were at a reduced senior rate)

Weather - The weather was wonderful! There were a number of cloudy days but only a few very brief rain showers. Temperatures during the day ranged from the mid 50’s to mid-70’s, with nighttime temperatures in the 40’s-50’s.

Walking – In the past we’ve usually walked 7-12 miles per day while traveling but made a choice to decrease that to protect my knees from the pain I’ve experienced on previous trips. Our miles walked on this trip ranged from 2.5 to 8.83 for a total of 82.7 and an average of 6.36. I’m happy to say that I experienced few problems with my knees as a result of limiting our walking and the number of steps I climbed. When I did have pain, I used the topical Ibuprofen gel that is available in Europe and works quickly to relieve discomfort.

Flight To Barcelona

We departed Houston two-and-a-half hours late on October 30th but had a long layover in Newark and we made our connecting flight with no problem. (I always allow several hours for a layover.) We arrived in Barcelona at 9 am on Thursday morning, October 31st, and although the line for customs and immigration was long, additional agents were added and we were moved to a very short line and finished the whole process in less than 30 minutes. We were surprised to find that, although there was signage in English, the airport was not as well signed as others we’ve experienced in Europe and directions to various forms of transportation were not as clear. Fortunately, information kiosks were available throughout the airport and multi-lingual staff members were friendly and helpful.

I was given directions to an Orange kiosk in the Marketplace to get SIM card and data/phone plan for my phone so that I could use Google Maps and call hotels and restaurants. The SIM card and 10 GB data and 200 minutes of talk time cost 25 Euros.

We also asked for directions to the Aerobus and were able to purchase tickets at the bus stop. Staff announced that the bus would not stop at the university because of a demonstration there that day. I don’t know whether traffic was especially heavy or the bus had to take a different route than its usual one but the bus to Place de Catalunya took about an hour instead of the usual 35 minutes. It was a comfortable ride with easy luggage storage and cost only 5.90 Euros per person.

Arriving at Placa de Catalunya In a jet-lagged brain fog, I mistakenly set Google Maps to driving directions instead of walking and we spent about a half hour walking far out of the way to get to our hotel, the Continental Palacete on Rambla de Catalunya. An elevator carried us from the ground floor to the reception desk and our room (#138) nearby. We had planned to leave our luggage and check in later but our room was ready when we arrived about 11 am. The decor was pleasant throughout the hotel and our room was spacious by European standards and was well appointed, with a queen-sized bed with end tables and lamps, a desk and chair, a small table with 2 chairs in front of a large window, and a closet with safe and small refrigerator. The bathroom had an excellent tub/shower with plenty of hot water and good water pressure. The room was quiet and we didn’t hear any street noise. https://www.hotelcontinental.com/hot...n/default.html

We unpacked and ate lunch at the round-the-clock buffet, where there was a wide variety of choices (meats, cheeses, salads, fruit, vegetables, breads, cookies, cakes, ice cream, juices, coffee, tea, milk, wine, beer, and more, with additional hot egg and other breakfast dishes after 8 am). Each day we ate breakfast from the buffet and returned at lunch and sometimes for dinner or an evening snack. The dining room was beautifully decorated and furnished and provided a place to chat with other guests. Staff members were friendly and helpful in providing assistance and recommendations.

The hotel’s location in the heart of the Eixample district was perfect. Placa de Catalunya and Casa Batllo were only a couple of blocks away, Casa Mila just a couple of blocks more, and many other sights were within easy walking distance. Metro stops were also close, making it easy to reach sights that were farther away.

Thursday, October 31st “Exploration”

We began our exploration of Barcelona with a two-block walk to Placa Catalunya, filled with people feeding a large flock of pigeons, then on through Placa Nova to the Cathedral of the Holy Cross and Saint Eulalia, also known as Barcelona Cathedral or Le Seu, a Gothic Cathedral constructed from the 13th to 15th centuries (7 Euros per person senior admission). This was our first encounter with the elaborate use of gold in altarpieces here and elsewhere in the cathedrals we visited in Spain, as well as the beautifully carved choir stalls. An elevator and a couple of flights of stairs carried us up to the roof, where we caught our first sight of the towers of La Sagrada Familia. Back on the ground, we passed through the old Roman gate and wandered around the Barri Gotic and then down to the waterfront, passing the interesting sculpture referred to as the Barcelona Head. As we walked the promenade to the Rambla del Mar, there was a sprinkling rain that lasted only a few minutes and stopped by the time we reached the Christopher Columbus Monument. Despite having to navigate a major traffic circle, we found that here, as elsewhere, it was easy to cross the street via the crosswalk. Drivers were courteous and seemed careful of pedestrians.

Our walk took us up Las Ramblas, the wide pedestrian thoroughfare from the waterfront to Placa de Catalunya, and we enjoyed seeing the street performers; the various stalls selling souvenirs, food, and flowers; and a few people dressed in costumes for Halloween. Visiting the Modernista works of Antoni Gaudi was a primary interest in Barcelona, so we took a slight detour to view the exterior of Palau Guell, one of Gaudi’s earlier buildings (1886-1888), and marked by the intricate forged ironwork decorating the facade. Returning to Las Ramblas, we soon found ourselves at the huge La Boqueria Market with its colorful food stalls, where we discovered the always tasty croquettes available on menus across Spain. Continuing on through Placa Catalunya, we stopped at a tobacco shop to buy a T-10 Metro card ($10.20) that we shared (we bought a second one later in our stay) and soon found ourselves at our hotel, where we ate dinner from the buffet and, exhausted from lack of sleep and our almost 7-mile walk, crashed in bed.

Miles walked 6.83 miles
Sim Card/data plan 25 Euros
Bus to Hotel 11.80 Euros
Metro Card (T10) 10.20 Euros
Hotel 205 Euros
Food 4.50 Euros
Cathedral admission 14 Euros (for 2 people)

Barcelona Cathedral

Placa de Catalunya

Las Ramblas

Jamon (Ham) at La Boqueria Market
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Old Feb 6th, 2020, 12:15 AM
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Looks like a great holiday. I’d like to go to Spain one day.
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Old Feb 6th, 2020, 07:42 AM
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I hope you get to go! We planned a trip to Spain and didn't get to go then but it was worth the wait. We actually enjoyed it more than we anticipated. The people were so friendly and the sights were wonderful.
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Old Feb 6th, 2020, 08:02 AM
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Friday, November 1, 2019 “Gaudi Day”

Friday, November 1, 2019 “Gaudi Day”

The Parc Guell lizard

Hall of 100 Columns in the Monumental Zone

The garden in Parc Guell

The iconic Parc Guell benches in the Monumental Zone

A structure in the Monumental Zone

We rarely sleep in while traveling as we try to schedule crowd-beating early admission times for most sights. So we were up at 6:30, dressed and had a filling breakfast, and left at 8:15 to walk through a beautiful residential area to the nearby Passeig de Gracia Metro entrance, take Line 4 to the Anton X stop, and connect to Bus Guell, which took us to the entrance of the park area of Parc Guell (7 Euros per person senior admission, including Bus Guell), originally developed by Gaudi as an upscale housing development (1900-1914). We were glad that we had purchased our tickets several weeks before as we heard that they were sold out for the day of our visit.

The walk through the nature trails was refreshing and allowed us glimpses of Gaudi’s incorporation of natural forms in his architecture. We arrived in plenty of time for our 9:30 admission to the Monumental Zone and were transfixed by Gaudi’s colorful whimsy. Having seen many photos of the tile-decorated benches undulating long the edge of the terrace, we were disappointed to find that most of them were blocked off for restoration. A few sections were open, however, and we waited our turn to take photos sitting on the benches with the skyline of Barcelona in the distance. We were equally captivated by the colorfully decorated Hall of 100 Columns, the stairway and fountains, the famous ceramic dragon often used as a symbol of Parc Guell, and the gingerbread lodges near the main entrance. We wound our way back up to the terrace and through the nature trails to the exit, where we caught Bus Guell back to the Alfons X Metro station and returned to our hotel for lunch and a brief rest.

One of the great pleasures of the location in which we stayed was being able to view the beautiful homes that lined the streets as we strolled along. Everywhere we looked there were interesting facades, pretty sculptures, and intricate ironwork balconies, and even the sidewalk was paved with tiles designed by Gaudi using his original cast. Of special note was the “Block of Discord,” a single block along Passeig de Gracia that is home to three different styles of Modernisme by three of the most important modernist architects 19898-1906): Casa Lleo Morera at #35, designed by Lluís Domènech i Montaner; Casa Amatller designed by Josep Puig i Cadafalch, at #41; and Casa Batllo, designed by Antoni Gaudi, at #43. Two blocks farther along Passeig de Gracia, at #92, is Casa Mila (La Pedrera), also designed by Antoni Gaudi and Jose Maria Jujol. Both Casa Batllo and Casa Mila have been designated as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Because of the uncertain political conditions in Barcelona around the time of our visit, we hadn’t purchased tickets to the two Gaudi-designed houses on Passeig de Gracia, and we had already seen long lines forming at Casa Batllo (remodeled by Gaudi 1904-1906) during our walk to the Metro station in the morning. We checked online and knew that tickets were available, so we purchased them while eating lunch at the hotel (22 Euros per person senior admission) and made the easy walk to the colorful house at #43. An interesting audiovisual tour was included in the ticket price and included a device that showed how each room would have looked when it was furnished and decorated. There were a lot of stairs to climb as we ascended to the various floors but we were rewarded with interesting sights, including the fanciful structures on the roof.

We purchased our tickets (16.50 Euros per person senior admission) to Casa Mila, also called La Pedrera (built 1905-1910) on our walk there and were able to enter quickly. We found it even more fascinating than Casa Batllo, especially the rooms that were furnished as they would have been for the Mila family, and, of course, the incredible rooftop with its creative stairwells, ventilation towers, and chimneys.

We returned to the hotel for a snack and a little down time and then walked to Ciutat Comtal, a nearby restaurant recommended by the desk clerk. We preferred to relax at a table and had a half-hour wait, which gave us time to familiarize ourselves with the various offerings on the menu. We were fortunate to get a table in the main downstairs dining room and a delightfully engaging waiter, Tony. We ordered primarily from the tapas menu but had one dish from the main menu. All were artfully presented and delicious. Our choices included Salmon & Prawn with Cream Cheese (2.70 Euros), Fig with Ham & Mascarpone (4.65 Euros), Prawn with Avocado & Asparagus (2.75 Euros), Cod with honey allioli (10.95 Euros), Sirloin with foie (5.95 Euros), Shrimp Skewer (4.45 Euros), Eggplant Chips with Honey (5.70 Euros), three mini desserts - Cream Catalan, Apple tart, and Torrija St Teresa for 2.85 Euros each – and a small pitcher of amazing sangria (11.60 Euros). It was our second most expensive meal in Spain but well worth the splurge. I hadn’t coached my husband that tipping wasn’t expected, and when he added 15%, Tony encouraged us to return to see him the next night for the featured suckling pig! After dinner we walked a block to see Placa Catalunya lighted up at night and then returned to the hotel.

Miles walked today - 6.08 miles

Hotel - 205 Euros

Food – 71 Euros

Entrance charges – 91 Euros for 2 people (at senior rates)
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Old Feb 6th, 2020, 08:13 AM
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Photos from Casa Battlo

Our camera battery died while in Casa Battlo so we didn't take many photos. If you love the color blue, this place is for you! Note that there are several flights of stairs to be climbed.


Casa Batllo exterior

Casa Batllo stairs

Casa Batllo atrium

A room in Casa Batllo
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Old Feb 6th, 2020, 08:22 AM
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Thanks for writing a TR, drchris. Gorgeous pictures and super details. It sounds like you fell for Spain the same way DH and I fell for Italy. More soon, please!
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Old Feb 6th, 2020, 08:28 AM
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Photos from Casa Mila (La Pedrera)

We enjoyed our visit to Casa Mila (La Pedrera) even more than to the more well known Casa Batllo. The furnished rooms gave a good idea of the way that the residents lived at the time the building was designed, and the roof structures were fascinating.


Exterior of Casa Mila (La Pedrera)

Casa Mila (La Pedrera) atrium

One of the furnished rooms

The colors were beautiful.

On the roof of Casa Mila (La Pedrera)
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Old Feb 6th, 2020, 08:44 AM
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Dinner at Barcelona's Ciutat Comtal

The dinners at Ciutat Comtal were our first introduction to tapas in Spain. Tapas are a great way to sample a lot of different specialties at a reasonable cost.


This was a popular place and there was always a line but it moved quickly.

You could eat at the bar but we enjoyed being seated at a table in the dining room for a more leisurely meal.

Salmon and prawn with cream cheese toast and fig with ham - both were great!

Eggplant chips with honey. I'm not a fan of eggplant but this was delicious.

Cod with honey allioli - really good

Prawns, avocado, and asparagus

Cuttlefish, squid, prawns, and clams - recommended by the waiter and delicious
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Old Feb 6th, 2020, 09:17 AM
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Glad you enjoyed Spain! My teenage daughter and I loved it when we were there 2 years ago - esp Barcelona and all the Gaudi stuff. Fun We ate tons of paella, so good!
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Old Feb 6th, 2020, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by TDudette View Post
Thanks for writing a TR, drchris. Gorgeous pictures and super details. It sounds like you fell for Spain the same way DH and I fell for Italy. More soon, please!
Spain wasn't at the top of our bucket list but we did want to go and had postponed it for five years, so we were pleasantly surprised by how much we enjoyed it. I think that it sometimes helps to not have really high expectations although I've rarely been disappointed by a place that I was very much looking forward to seeing. When we went to Italy for thr first time, Rome was the place I was least excited about seeing but ended up loving it and were so happy when the opportunity to return presented itself last Spring. We were also able to visit several Tuscan hill towns and Assisi on our second visit and they were all a delight. Truth be told, any new place I see almost always makes me happy!
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Old Feb 6th, 2020, 12:01 PM
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drchris: I was in Barcelona last Spring (been there several times before) and concentrated on Gaudi. I can never get enough of Barcelona!

Your pictures are divine

I like that you have provided budget information - very useful for travellers.

Keep going … I'm loving it!

Regards Ger
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Old Feb 8th, 2020, 04:36 PM
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Originally Posted by OReilly64 View Post
drchris: I was in Barcelona last Spring (been there several times before) and concentrated on Gaudi. I can never get enough of Barcelona!

Your pictures are divine

I like that you have provided budget information - very useful for travellers.

Keep going … I'm loving it!

Regards Ger
Thanks for your very kind comments. I had dreamed of seeing Parc Guell and Sagrada Familia since my daughter went there during her semester abroad. I was so taken with Sagrada Familia that I many have to return when it's completed!
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Old Feb 8th, 2020, 04:45 PM
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Along for the ride!
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Old Feb 8th, 2020, 05:45 PM
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Saturday, November 3, 2019 The Crown Jewel of Barcelona

La Sagrada Familia, Arc de Triomf, Ciutadella Park, Santa Catarina Market, Barceloneta Beach, Placa de Espanya, Font Magica de Montjuic (Magic Fountain)

We rose early again to allow time for another filling breakfast and chatting with other guests at the hotel, most of whom were in town for a few days before departing on a transatlantic cruise, something that we hope to do ourselves one day. We had purchased tickets for a 9:00 am admission time to La Sagrada Familia and wanted to arrive in time to take photos of the exterior before entering the basilica. A quick ride on Metro Line 2 delivered us there and we were immediately struck by the immense size and intricacy of detail. We snapped some photos from a distance and joined the line to go in. As we waited, someone asked one of the guards where he could buy tickets and was told that there were none available for weeks. The man seemed surprised, and it surprised me that someone would not have done even basic research on a place that is so world-famous, and I was grateful to have the time and resources to do such detailed trip planning.

After passing through security, we were first admitted to an outdoor area from which we could capture closer photos of the Nativity façade, and waited there until the doors to the basilica were opened. It’s difficult to find words to describe my first sight of the interior. It is so simple and yet so extraordinarily beautiful, vast in size and yet intimate in experience. The support columns soar up like a forest of trees and the many stained glass windows glow with light. Perhaps most striking was the sparseness of the altar: a simple figure of Christ suspended in mid-air beneath a canopy edged in lights. The decoration of the cathedral was minimal, yet each one was exquisite, like a brilliant jewel in a perfect setting. We each had an audio tour that explained the construction of the basilica and the meaning of the details but it was almost more distracting than helpful as this exquisite place required no explanation to grasp its brilliance.

My husband’s ticket (26 Euros senior admission) included admission to the Nativity Tower but I was reluctant to attempt the climb down the many steps from the observation crosswalk so I simply purchased the entrance with audioguide (20 Euros senior admission) and continued to take in the details and be overwhelmed with awe at Gaudi’s brilliant creation. After he descended from the tower, we exited from the door on the Passion façade, which stands in stark contrast to the Nativity facade. The grim, angular sculptures by Josep Maria Subirachs express clearly the agony of Christ’s betrayal, torture, and crucifixion. After exiting the basilica, we walked around to view the unfinished Glory façade, its towers swirling upward with resplendent reminders of the hope of the resurrection and salvation.

La Sagrada Familia has been under construction since 1882 and its construction is planned to be finished by 2026, the 100th anniversary of Gaudi’s death.


Nativity Facade of La Sagrada Familia


Detail from the Nativity Facade of La Sagrada Familia


Detail from the Nativity Facade of La Sagrada Familia


Passion facade of La Sagrada Familia


Passion facade of La Sagrada Familia


A sculpture from the Passion Facade of La Sagrada Familia


Interior of La Sagrada Familia


Interior of La Sagrada Familia


Interior of La Sagrada Familia


Interior of La Sagrada Familia - This area was designed when Cubism was popular.


Interior of La Sagrada Familia


Interior of La Sagrada Familia


Interior of La Sagrada Familia


This entrance to the Glory Facade will become the main entrance into La Sagrada Familia when construction is completed in 2026.


From the basilica we took Metro Line 2 to the Tutuan stop and walked to the Arc de Triomf, built as the main access gate for the 1888 Barcelona World’s Fair, and on to Ciutadella Park, where we passed by the Castle of the Three Dragons, an example of early Modernism designed by architect Lluis Domènech i Montaner and home to the Barcelona Zoological Museum. The highlight of the park was the beautiful Font de la Cascada, a double waterfall and small lake with four dragon sculptures and a sculpture of Diana on a clamshell that is part of a monument topped with a golden chariot drawn by four horses. It was designed by Josep Fontsére with the help of a young architecture student, Antoni Gaudí.




Arc de Triomf


Arc de Triomf, detail


Font de la Cascada in Ciutadella Parc


Font de la Cascada in Ciutadella Parc

We were hungry and hoped to find something to eat at Santa Catarina Market. Unfortunately, Google Maps led us on a long goose chase before we found our way there, only to find that it wasn’t filled with places to eat as La Boqueria Market had been, so we ate one of protein bars and forged on through Barceloneta to the beach. My husband loves to dip in his toes in the water whenever we are near a beach, so he rolled up his pants legs and did just that. The beach was surprisingly populated and a few people braved the cold water. As we walked along the promenade we checked out the wares of the street vendors spread out on the sand and my husband haggled the vendor down to the price he wanted to pay (8 Euros) for a large cotton spread with an exotic design.


Santa Catarina Market


Santa Catarina Market


The Barcelona Head


Barceloneta Beach with the iconic W Hotel in the background


Christopher Columbus Monument

By this time we were pretty exhausted but had to find our way back to the Barceloneta Metro station to return via Line 4 to the hotel. It was late afternoon and we hadn’t had lunch so, remembering our wonderful dinner at Ciutat Comtal, decided to return. We should have asked to be placed at a table with Tony as our waiter but instead ended up tucked away in a dark corner upstairs with a not-nearly-as-helpful-or-personable waiter. We would have been wise to order the things we’d liked the night before before but in our quest to try new and different tastes, ordered the canelloni (5.70 Euros) we had seen delivered to another table and found it only OK, especially as we couldn’t figure out what it was stuffed with! The scallops gratin (7.40 Euros) was better but the winner was a dish recommended by the waiter, a tasty mixture of cuttlefish, squid, prawns, and clams (9.35 Euros). Once again I was reminded of my general rule NOT to return to a restaurant where I’ve had an especially good meal as I’m often disappointed the second time around.

After a short rest at the hotel, we walked to Place de Catalunya to ride Line 1 to Placa de Espanya. What a busy place in evening traffic! We walked to the Font Magica de Montjuic and, having arrived early (as usual) found seats directly in front of the fountain. A group of young men put on a dance show as we waited and passed their hats for donations. Gradually the fountain began to send up sprays of water and the lights came on as a delightful show set to music – rock for the first part and classical for the second part – began. It was fun to watch the changing patterns of water, light, and music, and we enjoyed being out among families and tourists alike on a beautiful autumn night. We left before the show ended, hoping to beat the crowds on the Metro, and enjoyed strolling along the fountain-lined avenue leading back to Placa de Espanya and seeing the lighted Arenas de Barcelona, which once served as a bullfighting arena but is now filled with shops and restaurants.



Placa de Espanya


National Museum of Catalan Art on Montjuic


The Magic Fountain on Montjuic

Miles walked today - 8.83

Hotel - 205 Euros

Food - 36 Euros

Entrance charges - 46 Euros for 2 people (at senior rates)

Metro Card (T10) 10.20 Euros
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Old Feb 8th, 2020, 08:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Melnq8 View Post
Along for the ride!
The more the merrier! Keep coming back!
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Old Feb 8th, 2020, 08:51 PM
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Enjoying your trip to Spain.
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Old Feb 9th, 2020, 07:10 AM
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Reading this with great interest as a friend and I will be in Barcelona and Madrid next month and I've been grappling with the details, trying to work out an itinerary that will allow us to fit in as much as possible in the four full days that we have.

My husband’s ticket (26 Euros senior admission) included admission to the Nativity Tower but I was reluctant to attempt the climb down the many steps from the observation crosswalk so I simply purchased the entrance with audioguide (20 Euros senior admission) and continued to take in the details and be overwhelmed with awe at Gaudi’s brilliant creation.

One of us is a senior, but I don't see the option to purchase a senior ticket on the Sagrada Familia website - I assume your purchased directly from their site?
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Old Feb 9th, 2020, 10:44 AM
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Never mind, found it!
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Old Feb 9th, 2020, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Melnq8 View Post
Reading this with great interest as a friend and I will be in Barcelona and Madrid next month and I've been grappling with the details, trying to work out an itinerary that will allow us to fit in as much as possible in the four full days that we have.

My husband’s ticket (26 Euros senior admission) included admission to the Nativity Tower but I was reluctant to attempt the climb down the many steps from the observation crosswalk so I simply purchased the entrance with audioguide (20 Euros senior admission) and continued to take in the details and be overwhelmed with awe at Gaudi’s brilliant creation.

One of us is a senior, but I don't see the option to purchase a senior ticket on the Sagrada Familia website - I assume your purchased directly from their site?
Are you using the official site? https://sagradafamilia.org/en/tickets I just went there and after indicating the type of ticket :Individual), date, selecting the tour (I chose Sagrada Familia with Tower), then time for initial entrance and time for tower entrance, and the number of admissions, the next screen shows each of the types of tickets, including the senior ticket for 27 Euros. I also went through the screens for a regular admission and also found the senior discount ticket for 21 Euros. Be sure to use the official website as there are some that sell fake tickets that won't be accepted when you try to enter.

When I did research, most people though the Nativity Tower was more impressive than the Passion Tower. My husband found what he was able to see on the Nativity Tower to be a disappointment, that he didn't really see that much and the construction blocked certain views and photo shots. He is fit and didn't find the climb down to be too difficult.

I hope that you enjoy your visit as much as we did. I was just in awe once we were inside and my husband had to drag me away. Book as far in advance as you can and try to book either the earliest that you can go or late in the afternoon. We were the first group in and it was nice to be there for a little while when it wasn't too crowded, although the crowds came in pretty quickly.
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Old Feb 9th, 2020, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Melnq8 View Post
Never mind, found it!
Great! I just wrote an explanation of how to find it but somehow it didn't get posted. I hope you enjoy your visit there as much as we did. My husband had to drag me away as I was mesmerized!
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