help for st. lucia

Old Sep 16th, 1999, 12:50 PM
  #1  
margaret
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help for st. lucia

could someone inform me as to how far My Helens Inn at Gros-Islet is from Rodney Bay? Would Candyo Inn be closer to activity? (restaurants, stores, etc.) My husband and I are interested in a quiet hotel that doesn't cost big bucks-we go the first part of December. We like to get away for a week or two in the winter, as we are dairy and crop farmers, not much money but we find a way. Could someone help on this? Also is the airport in the southern part of the island requiring travel to the northwest? Would there be hotels on the southwest that are not expense? I heard the southwest was the better part for beach. Thanks for your help.
 
Old Sep 16th, 1999, 11:03 PM
  #2  
C.Clark
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Hi Margaret, we stayed at Candyo Inn and it was really nice. Rodney Bay is closer to the activity and Candyo Inn is walking distance to good restuarants and shopping. Excellent restuarant called Capone's is steps away from Candyo Inn.
Very beautiful island but one that I will never go back to again. Have Fun.
 
Old Sep 17th, 1999, 04:13 AM
  #3  
Margaret
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To C. Clark, I am curious as to why you would not go back? Thanks for any insight.
 
Old Sep 17th, 1999, 06:48 AM
  #4  
lisa
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Margaret: St. Lucia is wonderful. I was there last November and had a fantastic week and definitely will go back someday. Haven't stayed at the properties you're asking about, but definitely agree that the southwestern part of the island near Soufriere and the Pitons is the most beautiful part of the island. We stayed at Ladera, which was very pricey, but I'm told there are other options in/near Soufriere that are more reasonable. One smaller hotel I have heard good things about is the Hummingbird -- we ate dinner there one night and had a lovely time, but didn't look at the rooms, and I'm not sure how much they are. You may want to look into it though. I have also heard good things about the areas around Rodney Bay and also Marigot Bay but I think it all depends on what you're looking for. Nothing beats the scenery around the Pitons and the great snorkeling right off the beach at Anse Chastanet (all beaches on St. Lucia are public, so you are free to go to any of them no matter where you stay). Here is a website that has links to tons of St. Lucia websites:
http://virtualvoyages.com/carib/st_lucia/stl_guid.htm
 
Old Sep 17th, 1999, 01:19 PM
  #5  
C.Clark
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Hi Margaret, we've been to St.Lucia twice, I made sure to go back a second time to see if my opinion was different from the first and it wasn't. I think that St. Lucia is one of the most beautiful islands in the caribbean, but the abuse towards animals is appalling.
When we travel we never stay at all-inclusives and we always rent a car and travel all over by ourselves and never have we felt this way about any place that we have been except St. Lucia. I watched as people tried to hit dogs with cars on purpose and when we asked why people were doing this a guy that we met called Steve said that people have always done that there. We saw a dog dragging its back legs and hips trying to get out of the way of cars and it broke my heart. We were hounded constantly.We walked into town to feed some of the dogs and a "rummy" laying on the sidewalk said give me the food not the dog, I told him to get off his lazy ass and get a job.
We also had a woman jump out in front of our car asking for money saying that she had no money to feed her kids and wouldn't move until a man pulled her away,telling us not to give her money back she'd just drink it.
The women tend to work more in St. lucia than the men and when I asked some of the women why they put up with this they said that we have kids and we have to feed them, they won't.
Everybody likes different things, maybe if we could have looked past these things then maybe we would have enjoyed
St.Lucia more. But I can't have a compassion for people who don't treat all living things with respect. There were more things that happened, but I think that you get my drift. If you go have a good time, just because we feel the way we do doesn't mean that you should. But I will tell you that one of the most beautiful islands that I have ever seen is Dominica, people will tell you that economically it's one of the poorest islands in the caribbean but I personally think the people there are richer than most of us. Anyways whatever you do have agood time.
 
Old Sep 17th, 1999, 04:47 PM
  #6  
Siobhan
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Margaret,
We stayed at Anse Chastenet this June (Over-priced). While there, I checked out the rooms at the much more reasonable Hummingbird. They were clean, but basic. Only one was air-conditioned. The island was hot, humid & buggy in June, so we missed air-conditioning, but December is probably different. The location of the Hummingbird is good, close to town but not too close. The pool area was very pretty, and the bar and restaurant were nice and not too pricey by this island's standards. I have mixed feelings about St. Lucia and am not sure I would go back. It has the worst roads I've found in the Caribbean and transportation is very expensive, making it very difficult to get around. The snorkling right off the beach was spectacular and the Pitons were breath-taking, most of the people were friendly but extremely poor. The natural beaches are black sand, very hot. The highlight of our trip was a half day sailing trip with Captain Kent aboard the Lucy. It left from Anse Chastenet. If you go, I wish you a wonderful time!
 
Old Sep 21st, 1999, 06:44 AM
  #7  
Caroline
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I went for my honeymoon in St. Lucia and can not understand why it gets a lot of praise. It was simply the most horribe experience of my life. True there is a lot of natural beauty, that is the only plus. Poverty is everywhere, the roads are terrible and it is hard to get around and the poster above is correct in that there is much animal abuse. Sure you can put blinders on and go to nice resorts and enjoy the food and scenery, but St. Lucia is a country with many problems and that is troubling. Please spend you hard earned money in a country that caters more to the well being of its people and environment.
 
Old Sep 21st, 1999, 07:39 AM
  #8  
heather
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C. Clark and Caroline,

We are planning a trip to St. Lucia in early June of next year for our honeymoon and are staying at Ladera Resort for 6 nights. We have heard so many great things on this forum so far about this part of the island that I was curious if you stayed closer to the Northern part of the island where it seems to be more populated? We have already booked the trip so I hope we don't have the same experiences you all did.

Also I am curious to hear from Lisa about what you saw as far as poverty and animal cruelty on the island? Your trip seems to have been a completly different experience than some of the other postings.

Thanks,
Heather
 
Old Sep 21st, 1999, 08:12 AM
  #9  
Cathy
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It seems that the people who "rave" about St. Lucia are the ones who spend easily $500 a night at the exclusive resorts or stay in their All-Inclusive resorts. As far as Anse Chastenet goes, I like the remark of one man who posted his review on the CTR roundup who compared the resort's accommodation as paying $600 a night for basically camping. I am sure for people who have a lot of money to spend, they see the best of St. Lucia.
 
Old Sep 21st, 1999, 08:26 AM
  #10  
lisa
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We were there for a week and definitely did not "put blinders on" or stay confined to the grounds of our hotel. We got out a lot and saw as much of the island as we could in one week. We saw no abuse of animals whatsoever and I simply cannot understand what these other posters are talking about. We did see animals on the island -- goats, cows, chickens -- and they were behaving exactly as livestock generally behaves here in the U.S. and appeared just as well fed! We saw a few stray cats over the course of the week but never saw them mistreated -- one wandered freely around Ladera and the guests loved it, saw a couple of kitties down by the dock in Soufriere that the fishermen took care of and they were happily munching on fish scraps. Only saw one or two dogs, with owners (not on leashes though) and they were fine. I simply can't account for these other experiences people had.

I do agree that the roads are very bad on St. Lucia, but again, that is a common problem in less-developed countries, particularly those that are volcanic and mountainous and experience significant rainfall during part of the year, because that makes the roads much more difficult to maintain (we are planning a trip to Costa Rica for this fall and are finding the exact same problem there, even though Costa Rica is a much "richer" country than St. Lucia). I certainly did not find transportation on St. Lucia to be expensive. Taxis are cheap and plentiful (much less expensive than here in the U.S.) and you can always bargain with them.

The statement that women work more than men in St. Lucia is simply not accurate in our experience. Both men and women work. All of the taxi drivers and water taxi (boat) drivers and fishermen we saw and rode with were local men. So were many of the groundskeepers, delivery people, farmers, etc. that we met. The guide we hired to take us into the rainforest one day was a local man named Bruno who is an expert on the St. Lucia rainforest, local flora and fauna, and conservation efforts on the island. It may be that women work outside the home more than men do, to supplement the family's income by working as waitresses or in hotels, etc. -- but that doesn't mean the men aren't working. Agriculture and tourism are the two largest industries on the island and it seemed like more of the men worked in agriculture and more of the women in the tourist industry. The banks we went into had both male and female employees, as did the grocery stores.

Yes, there is poverty on the island, but it is the same kind of poverty you find in other developing countries and even here in the U.S. in rural areas, where people have small homes and largely rely on farming and fishing to make ends meet. It is a "lower" standard of living than many of us are used to seeing, but it is not starvation, it is subsistence living and largely agricultural, depending on crops like coffee, bananas, etc. People employed in the tourism industry do somewhat better from what we could tell. We experienced no hostility whatsoever from any of the locals we met; they were very gracious and proud of their homes and churches. The schoolchildren walking to and from school in their uniforms were a sight to see and loved to have their pictures taken!

If you search this site under "St. Lucia" you will find that I am hardly the only one on this forum who loved the island and can't wait to go back.
 
Old Sep 21st, 1999, 08:29 AM
  #11  
heather
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Cathy,

Just so you are aware. Ladera is expensive by what we usually spend but it is no where near $500-600 a night for a Deluxe suite. Also having seen their rooms on the website and knowing how big my camping tent is (and I have been camping many times) it can't even be compared to eating freeze dried food, filtering my own drinking water and having to dig a hole so I can use the restroom. Besides for a lot of people its a honeymoon and a well deserved vacation. So who cares how much they spend?
 
Old Sep 21st, 1999, 08:38 AM
  #12  
lisa
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P.S. The hotel where we stayed, Ladera, while being a lovely and romantic place, is NOT an all-inclusive. We specifically chose not to stay in an all-inclusive because we wanted to get out and see more of the island and not only eat at our hotel. There was not a single day of our stay when we stayed on the grounds of our hotel all day, nor did we want to. NOR did we pay anything even close to "$500 a day" as the previous poster said. The room we stayed in normally runs $195 per night, including breakfast, but we got a package deal so it was much less than that (P.S. The Washington Post Sunday Travel section has had numerous advertisements every week over the past month or so for various packages to St. Lucia, including Ladera, that make it more affordable.) We used frequent flyer miles which saved us even more. For us, it was still pricey, but it was the trip of a lifetime and not something we do every day. But I definitely would not say that only those with a lot of money to spend see the best of St. Lucia. The best of St. Lucia -- as others here have agreed -- is its beautiful scenery, and that is free. What you spend on the accommodations is up to you.
 
Old Sep 21st, 1999, 05:44 PM
  #13  
C.Clark
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Lisa, I really have trouble believing that you never saw any starving animals in St. Lucia as they're all over the place, but as I continued to read your post and you mentioned taking cabs and how cheap they are, I now understand that you probably didn't see as much as you said you did. I have traveled extensively and I have seen many places alot poorer than St. Lucia, but St.Lucia
is the only place that we won't go back to and I have been to St. Lucia twice.
We stayed at a beautiful hotel for $75. per night and never saw any roaches. But when a person goes to a tropical place one expects to see bugs and other things that they don't see at home. Just a fact. We didn't find the bugs to be bad but the animal abuse was horrendous. And the tourist board in St.Lucia admits that some people find the animal abuse upsetting, but they also said to me that they find it unusual that we treat our animals the way we do. So if the tourist board acknowledges that some poeple would see a problem with the way animals are treated, I don't understand how you could say that they aren't. Also their cows and goats are tied to trees at the side of the road for hours on end with NO water and maybe only three feet of rope so that they can barely move, let alone find a place to get out of the sun. Now where do we in Canada and the U.S. treat our animals like that without being charged with abuse? The conclusion that I come to is that you haven't traveled that much or that you just enjoy very sheltered vacations.
 
Old Sep 22nd, 1999, 05:15 AM
  #14  
x
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C. Clark:

Talk about SHELTERED! You wrote: "Now where do we in Canada and the U.S. treat our animals like that without being charged with abuse? " That just goes to show your ignorance.

Do you have any idea what goes on in the food production industry in N. America? You write like the U.S./Canada is some sort of animal paradise. Where do you live and what rock are you under? Also are you familiar with the animal abuse laws and how difficult it is to get a conviction? Many U.S. judges will not even hear the cases let alone sentence the abuser with jail time.

It's real convenient to complain, but what are you going to DO about it? For instance, tourists have no problem going to those swim-with-the-dolphin exhibits with no concern for the welfare of the creatures and how stressful it is for them. That is a perfect example of animal abuse that is sustained by the tourists that fund these operators.

Enough on this subject. Like Lisa, I have been to St. Lucia and not seen any animal abuse. This discussion is completely off-topic to the original question posted.
 
Old Sep 22nd, 1999, 08:28 AM
  #15  
lisa
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C. Clark -- Well, it's hard to argue with someone as big-hearted and compassionate as you are. I could really feel the "respect" you have for "all living things," as evidenced by the charming anecdote you told about telling one of the local St. Lucians to "get off his lazy ass and get a job." Something tells me that the people of St. Lucia aren't exactly mourning the fact that you don't plan to return.

You may question my experience as much as you like, but my experience on St. Lucia was as valid as yours. I certainly don't have to defend it to you. Nevertheless, just for the information of anyone else reading this thread, we toured the entire circumference of the island, stopping at many places along the way (no, not on a tour bus; just us and a local guide to show us around, who was very proud of his island), in addition to spending a day touring the interior and hiking the rain forest, plus spending the rest of the week in & around Soufriere, and never saw any starving or abused animals anywhere on the island. I'm not claiming that they don't exist (that would be ridiculous; they exist here in the U.S. too); I'm just saying that we never saw any the entire week we were there. People can infer what they like about how widespread or common the phenomenon must be, based on our differing accounts. I can't account for the difference between your experience and mine, except to speculate that perhaps we were there at different times and maybe things have changed, or maybe there were localized problems in towns that we did not visit. I don't question the validity of your experience -- why do you question mine? For your additional information, my boyfriend and I have travelled a lot, both separately and together. I personally have visited 13 foreign countries, many of them twice -- not that that's relevant. If you like a place, you like it. You shouldn't have to "qualify" for liking it by demonstrating what a world traveller you are. What does that mean, whoever's visited the most places wins? I think it's interesting that you conclude that I must "enjoy very sheltered vacations." I have done everything from camping to staying in hostels to B&Bs and guest houses, and yes, I have also been fortunate enough to have stayed in some nice hotels (and some not so nice) -- some of which were inexpensive and some of which were not. I can't imagine how that is even remotely relevant to this discussion. I can only feel sorry for someone who has such a need to feel above a total stranger. You don't know anything about me. It is ironic, because YOU are the one who is shocked to find that in developing countries they may not treat animals as well as we do in the U.S. and Canada -- I think you must be the one who is sheltered if that is surprising to you. If we all decided not to visit any countries that don't meet our same cultural standards, it would be a very small world indeed. You must not be aware that in much of the developing world, child labor is common. Or that female circumcision is still practiced in many countries throughout the Middle East and Africa. For that matter, do you have any idea how many cases of CHILD abuse we have right here in the U.S. every year? All you have to do to see it is read the newspaper every day. If I started writing off places with any kind of abuse or local practices that I consider reprehensible, I'd never leave my home, let alone visiting Egypt, China, Mexico, etc. I wouldn't trade the week I spent on St. Lucia for anything. It was gorgeous.
 
Old Sep 22nd, 1999, 10:11 AM
  #16  
C.Clark
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Lisa, if you read my first post, I said nothing till I was asked. And when explaining that we have traveled extensively, maybe I didn't make myself clear, but the point that I was making was that we have been to a lot of poor countries and not in any place that we have been have I ever seen animals treated the way that I saw them in St.Lucia.

I believe that where ever you go you should try and help or make a difference
and if everybody speaks out that's the only way change will come.
And as for the "rummy" that I told to get a job, I still feel the same way. Being drunk at 11:30 in the morning, he should have thought, that instead of spending the money on booze he could have fed himself. And my husband did buy him something from one of the street vendors, I wouldn't have!!
And you may be right maybe they did something about the animals since I was last there and if they did I apologize.
Maybe enough people complained.
I also realize that alot of things go on all over the world and in our own countries as well, but without people speaking out how are things going to change? And as far as going to other countries where other forms of abuse go on anything that I see where I think that someone or something defenceless is being hurt I can assure you that I will speak up, whether anyone likes it or not.
Margaret if you go, I for one would like to hear when you get back if you think things are wonderful there. Maybe there's been a change I sure hope so.
 
Old Oct 4th, 1999, 06:25 AM
  #17  
lin delamaine
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People, please! I looked at this link for some information on Anse Chastanet and found out more about people's political views than I need to know. This is a travel site not a political forum and this "back and forthing" about animal abuse/women's rights is not what this forum is about. Let's respect that this is a forum for travel not politics.
 

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