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Which places are best to visit in Canada during summer?

Which places are best to visit in Canada during summer?

Old Oct 12th, 2022, 08:49 PM
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Which places are best to visit in Canada during summer?

I'm planning a month-long family trip from the UAE to Canada this summer. Niagara Falls is already on my bucket list, anyone who visited Canada please share your valuable suggestions for the top tourist attractions there. I'm very excited to hear from you all.

Stella Leo
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Old Oct 12th, 2022, 11:38 PM
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Welcome to Fodors. We moved your thread to the Canada Forum
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Old Oct 13th, 2022, 04:01 AM
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Stella Leo,

Canada is a beautiful place but need
a bit more information.

1. Where do you plan to fly into and out of?
2. Staying in hotels, or camping?
3. How many in your group? Ages etc.
4. Most important what do you like to do ie food, museums, nature, gardens, the beach, mountains, etc?
5. Renting a car? One way rental fees are very expensive.
6. Are you driving or flying from place to place? Canada is a very big place!

Enjoy the planning process.

Tom

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Old Oct 13th, 2022, 04:40 AM
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Thank you; I hope it will help me in getting suggestions for Canada's best tourist attractions.
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Old Oct 13th, 2022, 04:43 AM
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Stella Leo,

You need to answer the questions I posted so folks can give you suggestions.

Tom
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Old Oct 13th, 2022, 05:38 AM
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Hey Tom,
I'll answer one by one.

1. We planned to fly into Toronto and have not yet decided about the departure point.
2. We choose to stay in standard three-star hotels since this trip would last a month, but we would also like to try out luxurious hotels and camping.
3. I'm planning for a family trip of four, myself (age - 28), my Husband (age - 32), my Son (age - 3), Mother in Law (age - 65), and we don't have any health issues.
4. I wish to explore more natural scenery sites, and want to try out delicious Canadian food.
We need to include kid-friendly sites because this is my child's first trip to another country.
5. We haven't decided renting a car. If required, we can rent it.
6. As you said, Canada is a large country, and we need to cover the majority of places, we choose to fly instead of taking other modes of transportation.

I hope these responses are sufficient.
Stella Leo

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Old Oct 13th, 2022, 05:58 AM
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Stella Leo,

Great start folks can give you an idea of what to do. You will definitely need a car to get around. In 2022 many places had a rental car shortage so book your rental car once you know more details on your trip, reservations are free. You may want to also check out TripAdvisor website for specific areas you plan to visit. The website has food, hotel, and places to visit reviews from folks who have visited the area. Also check Facebook again for the areas you plan to visit. Planning is the fun part!

Tom
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Old Oct 13th, 2022, 08:50 PM
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Tom,

Thanks for your suggestion. We're only at the beginning of the planning process; need to research and book flights, plan schedules, food, and accommodations, pick places to visit, and primarily need to plan within our budget. As you suggested, we will book the rental car once we decided on where to go and our daily schedules. I'm already on TripAdvisor and other travel websites, asking for suggestions from folks, and I'm researching on Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, and other social media platforms also. I hope those who have visited Canada can give some better suggestions so that we can start planning accordingly.

Stella Leo

Last edited by StellaLeo; Oct 13th, 2022 at 08:56 PM.
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Old Oct 16th, 2022, 11:42 AM
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I get the sense that Stella Leo is doing just fine at... starting to get the wheels turning on creating a trip for herself.


We just don't as often get individuals who are coming from so far away, and who want to see all they can of the 2nd largest country on earth.

Most who show up here have a more narrow sense for where they're starting from and where they need to end up... so it makes it easier for Fodors regulars to narrow their own focus as well.

BUT IF the world is your oyster.. and Canada is your interest.... then that's fine too.


Were it ME... I guess I'd first want to decide whether you want to visit western Canada at all?


IF yes... then it probably makes most sense to envision flying (perhaps to Vancouver) and then making a circuit by car around at least British Columbia and Alberta.

Were I arriving from the UAE, I would (guess) that the mountains which divide BC and Alberta would offer some of the more unique sights on my trip... so that's good reason to visit the western part of Canada.

At some point you'll probably decide "yes" to the idea of visiting western Canada... so then you will want to decide whether you want that in the "middle" of your month... or on one end or the other.

Another useful decision to make relatively soon is whether you want to visit the far eastern reaches of Canada... I'm partial to Nova Scotia and surrounds, but nothing says you couldn't explore the more remote regions such as Newfoundland and Labrador, etc.


We here in North America gain a little bit more from going to Quebec merely for reasons of being somewhat immersed in French language and culture than you might... but for some of us, Quebec (OUTside of Montreal) is about as "Foreign" as we ever get. But surely you should make a side trip from Toronto to visit Montreal and Quebec City.

Quebec City has "the most photographed hotel in the world"... and I'm wildly guessing that you could probably stay there for a few nights as you explore nearby.

Montreal is worth even more nights... and another thing you can do this early in your planning is to create a rough outline of how many nights to allocate to which places.


Fodors here works best when you can create an outline for yourself before presenting it here and then listening to others (who know the various areas) give you suggestions to enhance your experience.

Canada is SO large that even with a month you still need to create priorities, and it should be fairly easy to first make guesstimates as to how many days to allocate to which areas/places, before only later figuring out in which way to arrange those different places.

(wild guesstimates here)

Toronto: 6 nights

Montreal: 3 nights

Quebec City: 2 nights

Vancouver: 4 nights

(car trip from Vancouver to Calgary and Edmonton (both Alberta) and great scenery in between): possibly 8 additional nights

1 day of plane travel from Toronto to Vancouver

1 day of plane travel from Vancouver back to Toronto


So after that simple guesstimate you only have about 5 days remaining of 30

With those 5, I would first decide whether you have interest in visiting Nova Scotia and surrounds.

Toronto to Halifax, Nova Scotia is a plane flight of just over 2 hours... so it isn't as time-consuming as is going out west to Vancouver.


You don't HAVE to visit Nova Scotia... and of course you can adjust the nights in various cities.

With Toronto likely to be so central to everything for you, you can chop-up your dates there and not seem to have to allocate quite so much of your calendar to it.


In brief, you yourself will need to create parameters which feel right to you, and only then will you gain the very best assistance and suggestions from all who read Fodors.


I hope this helps?


PS - No one, anywhere ever said: "Where can I find a good Canadian restaurant??"


The food is fine... it just isn't that distinguishable from American food.

We give them credit for bacon on pizza... and of course for maple syrup and poutine...

take a little off of poutine and you are left with the distinctly Canadian french fries and gravy...

The candy shelf at the local store in Canada is always a grand discovery, and for us in the USA it is fun to contemplate prospects there with which we don't already have life-long familiarity.


Even Canada's "Boston Pizza"... well... you know...


Last edited by NorthwestMale; Oct 16th, 2022 at 11:58 AM.
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Old Oct 16th, 2022, 08:21 PM
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NorthwestMale,

Thank you for your clear and detailed response. We now have a better view of our overall trip to Canada. I went through all of your suggestions on Google and am quite thrilled about them. I hope it will be a memorable and wonderful journey if we organize it properly according to this plan. We will definitely try out all of your suggestions, including the accommodation in Quebec City, the car ride, the food, and everything else.

Stella Leo
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Old Oct 16th, 2022, 10:33 PM
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Stella Leo,

IF you do visit Nova Scotia also consider a visit to Prince Edward Island (PEI) for a day or so. I have posted our experience on the island here. We have visited the island many times and is our special place.

Halifax and PEI

PEI is Canada smallest Province but has a lot to see. Access to the island is via a bridge, the Confederation Bridge, the 12.9 kilometer long bridge is the longest bridge over ice covered water in the world! You can also take a car ferry or by plane to get to the island. You can easily drive to the island from Nova Scotia.

Investigate the stories of Anne of Green Gables which were written by an islander over 100 years ago. The tourist area of Cavendish has many things about the author Lucy Maud Montgomery where she wrote her books about Anne. They have several amusement parks your son will enjoy. Itís a beautiful place with potato farms, red sand beaches and cliffs. Food on the island is wonderful famous for seafood including lobster, muscles, oysters, and fish. If on the island you have to try a lobster roll!

I hope when you get your month long trip planned you post your itinerary here.

Thanks

Tom


Last edited by tlc195; Oct 16th, 2022 at 10:37 PM.
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Old Oct 17th, 2022, 12:21 AM
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Tom,

Prince Edward Island, OMG! That's a great suggestion. We'll definitely put that place on our must-visit list. I hope my son will have a wonderful and memorable experience there by visiting amusement parks and the red-sand beaches. I love seafood, we'll definitely try it from Prince Edward Island, especially the lobster roll you recommended.

I'll definitely share our trip itinerary once it's finalized.

And, Tom, could you please let me know how many days we should spend exploring stunning places on Prince Edward Island without rushing?

Thank you for your time
Stella Leo
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Old Oct 17th, 2022, 07:13 AM
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Stella Leo,

2 days will give you a feel for the island. Flying in and out of Halifax, NS you can rent a car and do both places. You will have more flights into Halifax vs Charlottetown the airport on PEI.


Everything is open mid June through August on PEI.Each week in September some tourist businesses outside of Charlottetown will start to close. Most business in Cavendish are closed by the 1st week in September. By the end of October many tourist businesses outside of Charlottetown, Summerside, etc are closed. Always check websites or call to individual business you plan to visit to check operating hours.

Do not misunderstand me business do stay open for most of the year since the island has 150K population. But the business that tourist go to will close as summer help returns to school and foreign works go home.

Cavendish is very busy July 6-8 2023 for a country music event. You may want to avoid these dates as 50K folks attend the event.

https://cavendishbeachmusic.com

Tom

Last edited by tlc195; Oct 17th, 2022 at 07:18 AM.
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Old Oct 17th, 2022, 04:38 PM
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... to some amusement, the car toll for the bridge off of Prince Edward Island is at present $50.25... and will likely go up with inflation by next summer.


However, and getting more specific here... IF you decide to go to PEI and leave by car via that bridge...

it will put you in a place where it would then become a good use of your time to visit "Hopewell Cape" (in) New Brunswick.

The nearby Bay of Fundy has the highest tides in the world... and the difference between the water at high tide and the water at low tide is perhaps most eye-catching at Hopewell Cape.

There are many places around the Bay of Fundy where at low tide you will see large, ocean-going boats which are then sitting ON the ocean floor waiting for the tide to come back in so they can float once again.

It will be a funny sight to put deep within your son's mind in 2023... so that he can wonder if he REALLY saw that, when his mind matures just a bit in a few years.


Not terribly far from the end of the Confederation Bridge from PEI is also Cape D'or, (which is in Nova Scotia) where if you wanted to, you could arrange to spend a night at/near a lighthouse by the side of the Bay of Fundy.


Here is a thread I made a couple of years ago, with some pictures from Nova Scotia:

You - who are reminded of Nova Scotia by news of the recent tragedy - VISIT NS!

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Old Oct 17th, 2022, 08:53 PM
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Tom,

All your suggestions are much valuable. You've given us a better understanding of how to schedule dates more effectively. We'll definitely check websites and inquire about the operating hours of the individual businesses we wish to visit.

Thanks for your response
Stella Leo
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Old Oct 17th, 2022, 09:31 PM
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NorthwestMale,

Hopewell Cape! That's a great suggestion. I'm so excited by your words; about the beauty of Hopewell Cape, we'll definitely visit the most attractive sites around the Bay of Fundy. One thing we're sure, by visiting these places, we're going to give our son more memorable and surprising moments. And, we'll definitely plan to spend a night at/near a lighthouse by the side of the Bay of Fundy.

I read the thread you shared about Nova Scotia; thank you for posting them.

About the amusement parks, we will research the package, and will definitely try it if it gives the best experience for our kid.

Thanks for your time.
Stella Leo
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Old Oct 18th, 2022, 10:22 AM
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Hi

Most people that visit Canada are surprised by it's size.
I suggest that you get a physical map of Canada to get a sense of it's size by comparing it to the rest of the world.
Canada is bigger than America, all of Europe ( minus Russia) fits in Canada and there's room to spare.
Canada has 6 time zones, and the longest coastline in the world (Atlantic, Pacific and Artic oceans plus thousands of lakes).
It takes a week to drive from coast to coast without sightseeing.
Because of this trip planning and logistics are very important for a successful trip.

In some areas of Canada the distance between gas stations and accommodations can be hundreds of kilometers so I suggest that you consider flying the longer distances and only driving the shorter distances.

I did a road trip from Ontario to Prince Edward Island and carefully planned what I wanted to visit and how much time was needed.
Road trip, Ontario to Prince Edward Island, Canada
Hope that's helpful.

Happy travels
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Old Oct 18th, 2022, 08:22 PM
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Hi Stella Leo,

As a Canadian, I have a question and a few tips for you.

What is your family's travel style?

Do you like to quickly rush around and check things off lists? Are you content to spend your time rushing around everywhere with very little time in the destination? Do you only need 10 minutes to take a picture to say you've been there before you move on to the next place on your list? Or do you like to spend a few days in a destination, where it's 3-4 days in a major city to sample its restaurants, get to know its various neighourhoods, attend events and see tourist attractions and take in the atmosphere? And then maybe spend 3 days exploring the hiking trails and lookout points of a wilderness park? Or a few days at a lakeside resort so your kids can go swimming and you can read a book at the beach?

Next, the tips:

1. Accept you cannot see all of Canada in one month. It is impossible. Trying to "see it all" in Canada in one month is like trying to see all of Europe and the Middle East in one month. All of it. Every country. Every city. Every mountain. Every lake. Every scenic location. Crazy, right?
Instead, plan this trip as if this will be the first of many trips for your family to Canada, even if you have no fixed plans to come back any time soon. Give yourself the peace of mind that if you wish to return one day, you will make it happen.

2. Start researching Canada's provinces. Start with British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, and Quebec. Each province will have its own tourism website that reviews what the province will offer you and what you can see and do there. They often provide you with itinerary ideas too. This will be much more useful than Googling "Canada". You will find more detailed information once you start narrowing your scope to the provinces and cities. In many ways Canada's provinces and territories function like separate countries, each with their own look and feel, pros and cons, distinct climates, ecosystems, landscapes and regional cultures. But recognize that most of Canada's provinces are so vast, even with one month, you will only manage to properly explore one tiny part of one province. Only once you have researched the provinces, you'll want to research some of the cities for specifics, like must-see attractions, restaurants and family-friendly activities. Almost every city has its tourism website. And a Google search for "family-friendly Vancouver" or "family-friendly Montreal" will provide you with a ton of ideas too.

3. Truly understand the geography and climate of Canada to set expectations. Most first-time visitors don't understand that Canada is not uniformly mountainous, and they mistakenly fly into Toronto expecting to see mountains and turquoise lakes nearby, not realizing that they must fly 4 hours west to see the nearest dramatic mountains.

For example, British Columbia is famous for being the most mountainous part of Canada, for its wildlife tours to see bears and whales, and for dramatic scenery - old growth rainforests on Vancouver Island, beautiful ocean beach resorts on the Pacific like the ones in Tofino, its family friendly lake resorts in the Okanagan Valley like in Kelowna, quirky mountain towns that have great restaurant scenes like Nelson, and scenic cities like Victoria and Vancouver, also with excellent dining scenes. The climate is warm and dry on the coast, but hot and dry in the interior. It is never humid in the summer in BC.

Alberta is famous for being home to the Rockies, specifically Banff National Park and Jasper National Park - home to a lot of wildlife like elk, mountain goats and bears. Banff is famous for its turquoise lakes and glaciers. At mimimum you want to spend one week exploring Banff and Jasper, but warning it is the most visited place in Canada, so you will need to reserve your hotels (or campgrounds) well in advance. East of the Rockies you enter the prairies with its flat vast landscapes of canola and wheat, its cattle ranches, cowboy culture, and small rural farming towns. Alberta is famously dry and in the summer, it frequently gets thunderstorms in the afternoon which quickly come and go. Sometimes the thunderstorms become tornado warnings. Sometimes. I should also say, Calgary and Edmonton are the biggest cities in Alberta. Each are really nice, but are often overlooked by tourists. In early July, Calgary hosts the annual Calgary Stampede - a family-friendly friendly rodeo event/carnival, and the whole city becomes one big party. I have been once and it's a fun atmosphere.

Toronto and Niagara Falls are located in southern Ontario, the most urban, developed, and populated part of Canada. Ontario has no mountains and is not as dramatic as the west, but it has fantastic cities and historic sites and tourist attractions, and in the cities it will be hot and humid in the summer, sometimes with thunder storms.. Lots of fun cosmopolitan cities in Ontario. Toronto is the largest and perhaps the most misunderstood. I find it's less about cheking off a list of tourist attractions and it really becomes nice when you experience it by eating and drinking and going to cultural events. Ontario also has many quaint historic towns (look up Niagara on the Lake as a nicer restaurant alternative to the touristy chain restaurants of Niagara Falls) and there are also many farming regions in southern Ontario, and lakes as large as oceans. Most of Ontario is covered in thousands of lakes. But you will need to drive at least 4-5 hours outside of the cities before you get to the less developed, more forested lakes where people like to go camping and stay in cottages for a week at a time. Ottawa, the capital city of Canada, is also located in Ontario and is scenic with its canals and riverfront walkways, but it also has some of the best museums and art galleries in Canada. Ottawa's also famous for its shwarma restaurants! You could easily stay 3-4 days in Ottawa in the museums and galleries alone.

Then Quebec, the province next door to Ontario, is the only fully French-speaking province in Canada. The provincial government only recognizes French as the official language there. So expect all the infrastructure to be in French, but the major tourist cities (Montreal and Quebec City) will provide services in English usually. Montreal is one of the most exciting cities in Canada, a formerly industrial city, a blend of beautiful historic buildings and modern buildings, plus one of the best dining scenes in the whole country is there. It is very vibrant, artistic city - excellent cafes, bakeries, lounges, delis (you must try the Montreal smoked meat sandwiches and Montreal bagels) and family-friendly parks. The neighbourhoods are so fun to explore there. In the summer, everyone is eating and drinking and playing outside. It gets hot and humid there in the summer. Montreal is situated on an island in the middle of a major river. Quebec City is a scenic, historic walled city - very European. It is small but beautiful. There are mountains to the north of Quebec City and Montreal, but they are ancient mountains - smaller, lower elevation mountains, but do provide more of a wilderness experience. There are gorgeous waterfalls and many small charming towns to explore all through Quebec too.

4. Finally, don't believe NorthwestMale's narrow definition of what Canadian food is. You can get delicious Canadian food all over Canada. Canadian food is the food that we eat in Canada. Period. It's diverse, delicious, and is a tapestry of food traditions woven together, influenced by the hundreds of years of immigration to Canada from people from all over the world. It's also influenced by the local growing conditions, the local ecosystems, the locale waterways and climate, and by the local Indigenous cultures. But to deny the influence of immigrant traditions on Canadian cuisine is really sad. That's one of the most exciting things about Canada. Each province has its own local food traditions. Ignore the chain restaurants. Ignore the fast food. Look for the restaurnants that offer the local regional ingredients, whose menus are influenced by the local cultures. That is what Canadian food is.

So here in Vancouver for example, our local culinary scene is heavily seafood based with wild Pacific seafood like Sockeye salmon, or Dungeness crab, local shellfish like oysters, clams, mussels and scallops, local spot prawns, and wild halibut, and lingcod. Almost every menu has seafood on it. Because Vancouver's pioneers included Asian immigrants and the city has one of the largest Asian communities in Canada, Asian food is woven into our culinary tradition. It too is reflected in the restaurants. Asian grocery stores are mainstream here. Locals eat sushi frequently and it's everywhere and excellent. Authentic Chinese food can be found at hundreds of restaurants here. It's so good here, the New York Times did a full feature on it: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/04/t...staurants.html and the Chinese Restaurant Awards are a big deal: https://chineserestaurantawards.com/. And Vancouver has such a mild climate compared to the rest of Canada, there are lush valleys that grow a lot of local produce, and there are farms producing cheese, and entire wine regions (look up the Okanagan Valley, the Cowichan Valley, and the Similkameen Valley) that are wonderful, Often wineries have their own restaurants - Miradora at Tinhorn Creek in the Okanagan Valley is where I just had dinner a few days ago and it was phenomenal. All this was delicious Canadian food.

Whereas you go to Alberta, a farming and cattle ranching province, and the seafood is no longer as common, Asian cuisine isn't as common, and Alberta beef (especially steak) becomes the default food showcased on all the menus. And when you head further into the Prairies, you start to see freshwater seafood like pickeral on the menu at restaurants, and ingredients like saskatoonberry, and Ukrainian and Menonite dishes and even Jewish cuisine becomes much more common - perogies, kolbasa, Jewish delis, etc. It all reflects the immigration waves from the past several hundred years to the area and is very much Canadian food.

Anyway, I will stop with the food. Just don't write off Canadian food. And NorthwestMale, you need new restaurants to visit in Canada. Boston Pizza? Yikes!

Finally, with only one month I would consider an itinerary like this:

Week one:

Fly into Toronto
Spend a few days getting over jet lag and exploring Toronto
Drive to Niagara Falls and Niagara on the Lake for two days
Drive to Ottawa for a few days

Week two:

Drive to Montreal and stay there for 3-4 days
Drive to Quebec City for 3 days
Drive back to Montreal

Week three:

Fly from Montreal to Calgary
Rent a car and drive to Banff and Jasper spending one week

Week four (option 1):

Drive to the Okanagan (Penticton or Kelowna) for a few days on Lake Okanagan
Drive to Vancouver and finsh trip in Vancouver
Fly home from Vancouver

Week four (option 2):

Drive back to Calgary and fly to Vancouver
Spend 3 days in Vancouver
Spend 2-3 days in Victoria or Whistler
Return to Vancouver and fly home

Last edited by BC_Robyn; Oct 18th, 2022 at 08:51 PM.
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Old Oct 18th, 2022, 08:37 PM
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And I forgot, if you haven't looked at the Explore Canada website it might help you too: https://travel.destinationcanada.com/

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Old Oct 18th, 2022, 09:06 PM
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Hi aulop,

Thanks for your suggestions.

As you said, I too agree with your statement on the importance of trip planning and logistics for a successful trip. And, we are also very careful in planning every part of our trip, including where we want to go, how much time we want to spend in each location, food, accommodations, and so on; then only we can cover all our preferred destinations in a month.

I visited the thread you started to share your experience on the Ontario to Prince Edward Island road trip. You did an excellent job on capturing those stunning photographs, and I'm quite inspired by you.

Stella Leo
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