Jasper Alberta

Aug 10th, 2004, 10:27 AM
  #1  
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Jasper Alberta

Besides Jasper National Park, what other attractions can you go to?
travel4fun_ is offline  
Aug 10th, 2004, 11:30 AM
  #2  
 
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Jasper National Park has over 1,000 kilometres of hiking trails.

The most popular sight seeing spots near Jasper townsite are the Angel Glacier / Cavell Meadows hike, the tramway (cable car) up Whistler Mountain, and the walk in Maligne Canyon. Some (but not all) people like the boat cruise across Maligne Lake to Spirit Island.

Another pleasant outing from Jasper townsite is to Mount Robson Provincial Park to the west.

South of Jasper is the Icefields Parkway (Hwy #93) that leads to Lake Louise. The most popular scenic lookouts on that route are Athabasca Falls, Sunwapta Falls, Bow Lake and Peyto Lake. Many people enjoy the Snocoach ride on the Athabasca Glacier, which is part of the Columbia Icefields.

The scenic spots on the southern portion of the Icefields Parkway are actually located in Banff National Park, which is contiguous with Jasper National Park.
Judy_in_Calgary is offline  
Aug 10th, 2004, 11:42 AM
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Postscript.

Jasper National Park (JNP) is 4,200 square miles.

Jasper townsite's population, not counting visitors, is about 5,000. The town is large enough to have an adequate supply of hotels and restaurants to meet visitors' needs, but it's not exactly a metropolis.

Basically JNP's attractions are mountains, forests, lakes, waterfalls, canyons and occasional wildlife (elk, bear, etc.).
Judy_in_Calgary is offline  
Aug 10th, 2004, 11:46 AM
  #4  
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Thanks Judy_in_Calgary! Is the Snocoach ride availible in the Summer? Around End of August~September? Also does it snow in Jasper during End of August~September?
Thanks so much!!
travel4fun_ is offline  
Aug 10th, 2004, 01:21 PM
  #5  
 
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Yes, the Snocoach ride is available at the end of August / beginning of September.

It?s not impossible to encounter snow in the mountains at any time of the year. I myself have experienced snow there in July (although at a higher elevation than Jasper townsite). While I don?t think it?s likely that you?ll encounter snow (indeed you could even get quite warm weather, depending on your luck), you have to be prepared for anything. When you encounter precipitation in the mountains in summer, it?s more likely to be rain than snow.

The answer to packing for the mountains is to take layers so that you can add or subtract clothing as needed. You need everything from a short-sleeved top through a long-sleeved fleece top or sweatshirt to a waterproof jacket to wear as an outer shell. For the lower half of the body, you need shorts and long pants. Some people cover their bases by wearing pants with zip-on / zip-off legs, which can be converted to shorts. You also need sturdy walking shoes, preferably light hiking boots but at the very least runners. If you bring sandals in addition to lace-up footwear, bring a sturdy style of sandal, e.g., Teva.

Dress in the mountains is casual. As I?ve mentioned in another recent post, even upscale restaurants in the mountains require nothing more than smart casual dress. Moderately priced restaurants accept really casual dress (hiking boots, etc.).

Here is the World Weather Information Service website that shows Banff?s average temperatures by month. Jasper, being at a slightly lower elevation than Banff, typically is a degree warmer than Banff at any given time. As you can see, August?s average daily high is 70 deg F, and September?s average daily high is 61 deg F. The two months? average daily lows are 44 deg F and 37 deg F respectively. If you?re planning on going at the end of August / beginning of September, you can expect something in between, perhaps a high of 65 deg F and a low of 40 deg F. The temperatures shown on the website, however, are only averages. In reality you could experience temperatures that are higher or lower than the ones shown. I would say you could encounter anything from 75 deg F down to 25 deg F..

http://www.worldweather.org/056/c00623f.htm#climate

We were at Lake Louise the first weekend of September last year, and we walked around in T-shirts during the day (although it cooled down enough for us to need sweaters outdoors at night). But we?ve been there around that time during other years, and it sometimes has been cooler during the day (cool and wet enough for a long sleeved fleece top and a waterproof jacket).

It?s cold standing on the Athabasca Glacier when you step off the Snocoach tracked vehicle, no matter how hot the weather elsewhere in the mountains is. There usually is a cold wind across the glacier too. Bring sensible walking shoes and a warm top to wear when you ride out onto the glacier.
Judy_in_Calgary is offline  
Aug 10th, 2004, 06:12 PM
  #6  
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Wow! Thanks for all your wonderful answers to my questions!! They are really helpful!!! Thank-you!!!
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