Sydney-Things to Do

Dec 5th, 2015, 08:37 AM
  #21  
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Bokhara2, yes I agree with the ATM use and will do so whenever we actually need cash.

Rellie2, thanks very much for your additional recommendations.
Dukey1 is offline  
Dec 6th, 2015, 09:56 AM
  #22  
 
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You've gotten some great info. The only thing I'll do is vote for that day trip to the Blue Mountains--if nature and scenery interest you. I loved it there.

I like the stroll through the Botanic Gardens at dusk to see the huge flying foxes in the trees--ending up at the Opera House.

I'm also a wildlife person, so I'd include a trip to one of the zoos or animal sanctuaries. But I don't know if that's your thing.

Enjoy. I love Sydney -- and be sure to eat in Chinatown. One of my favorite unique local foods is the gozlemes at the stand in Paddy's Market.
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Dec 6th, 2015, 10:30 AM
  #23  
 
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Hi Songdoc

Great to see you popping in! Might you be planning another trip down here?

Dukey - Songdoc writes terrific trip reports, so have a look, just for the pleasure of a good read, even though you may not be going to all the same places he & his husband have been.
Bokhara2 is offline  
Dec 6th, 2015, 01:55 PM
  #24  
 
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I'm planning my third trip to Sydney late next year and have made note of some of these suggestions for myself. Here are some of my own favorites from previous visits:

- Getting out on the water using the public ferries and seeing Sydney Harbor from every vantage point possible.

- Walks along the shore. Spit to Manly, Taronga to Cremorne Point, and Royal Botanic Gardens to Opera House are some that we enjoyed.

- Walk across the Harbor Bridge and ferry back.

- Ferry to Manly and walking along the sandy shore and between the pine trees.

- Meal at Icebergs

- Dim sum at Marigold's and a seafood feast at Golden Century

I absolutely love Sydney and hope you will as well.
tripplanner001 is offline  
Dec 7th, 2015, 05:10 AM
  #25  
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I appreciate the additional comments and suggestions. It sounds as if we will have more than enough activities to choose from.
Dukey1 is offline  
Dec 7th, 2015, 07:07 AM
  #26  
 
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- Getting out on the water using the public ferries and seeing Sydney Harbor from every vantage point possible.>>


TP - as you are an old Sydney hand you would probably do this anyway, but I would strongly suggest buying a transport pass for the time you're there. we debated doing it, and by the time we'd decided to do it it wasn't worth it.

The possible extra cost of the pass was far outweighed by the amount of time we wasted [and the odd boat we missed] buying individual tickets.

lesson learnt.
annhig is offline  
Dec 7th, 2015, 11:00 AM
  #27  
 
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Just a few more, Dukey.

Cockatoo Island - http://www.cockatooisland.gov.au/
It's a short (10-15 minute, I think) ferry trip to the west of the Harbour Bridge. Interesting convict & dry dock history, great views & stunning sandstone in the dog-leg tunnel running through the island.

Here's a nice thing to do: ferry to Kirribilli (Jeffrey street wharf), wander around this lovely residential suburb.
Walk west under the railway overpass to Milsons Point & have a coffee or casual meal at Ripples. Head for the Luna Park face & you can't miss it.

Walk back to the CBD over the eastern side of the Harbour Bridge. Costs nothing, takes me about 15 mins with photo stops. Entry is at the steps near Milsons Point railway station & you exit at The Rocks in Cumberland street. There are steps at the beginning & end, but the walk is flat.
If you do this on a weekend, there will be markets on in The Rocks.

Restaurant reccos in the area: Garfish in Kirribilli, Ripples or its more formal associate, Aqua Dining at Milsons Point. If you feel like a swim, the North Sydney Pool is right next to Luna Park.
Bokhara2 is offline  
Dec 7th, 2015, 12:17 PM
  #28  
 
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Ann, you're right. We purchased MyMulti passes good for a week and used every ounce of it, especially on the ferries.

Bokhara2, I'm making note of your dining suggestions for next year.
tripplanner001 is offline  
Dec 7th, 2015, 02:10 PM
  #29  
 
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Here's another lovely spot on the north shore. Wendy Whiteley's Secret Garden
http://www.weekendnotes.com/wendy-wh...secret-garden/

Access from Milsons Point or McMahons Point.

The Kirribilli Club, above Wendy's garden, offers great views & good value casual food.

As does the Bondi Icebergs Club, unsurprisingly in Bondi. It's at the beginning of the Bondi to Bronte walk. Or the end of Bronte to Bondi walk, which is the direction i usually go.

Same views as the upmarket & upstairs Icebergs Bar & Dining - but at much more modest prices.

Take your ID. These are licenced clubs, which welcome visitors, but need to have them signed in to comply with licensing laws.
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Dec 8th, 2015, 02:33 AM
  #30  
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Thanks for this and the secret garden suggestion brings up a "travel" point for me and that is plant life.

We have been to what we here usually call the "Far East" but that, thus far, has always been above the equator. This will be our first time "down under" and I will be particularly interested in the plant (and wild) life.

Some of the secret garden pictures are intriguing, for example the one which is captioned "big bells" as that plant looks very similar to what we call here, "Angel's Trumpet." It is, unfortunately, highly poisonous but fun to look at.

I suppose the first thing I'll do is watch the drain to see if water really does circle counter-clockwise.

Thanks for these additional suggestions.
Dukey1 is offline  
Dec 8th, 2015, 09:16 AM
  #31  
 
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Here's a link to the Royal Botanic Gardens. They do good short walks through various parts of the gardens regularly.

Gruezi & I did one when she was here & she was intrigued with some of our native plants.

https://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/

You're right - the "big bells" in Wendy Whiteley's Secret Garden are Brugmansia / Datura. She has the white and peach/ apricot varieties.

Interesting you mention it being poisonous. I had one in my garden & cut it out because I was concerned it may be toxic to my animals, even though I'd had it for quite some time without any problems.

Then I heard a well known horticulturist talking about having several of them in his own garden. I asked him about the toxicity.

He said it would be hallucinogenic & poisonous in large quantities, but that they'd had them for years - along with cats, dogs, children & grandchildren playing in the garden.

So I let mine re-grow when it suckered up ( as they do, very quickly), planted another, and now have their glorious flowers perfuming my garden in the evenings.

If you rent a car for your Blue Mountains trip, the Mount Tomah Botanic Garden is well worth a look. And their cafe does a good, casual lunch. See the tag on the link above.
Bokhara2 is offline  
Dec 10th, 2015, 08:48 PM
  #32  
 
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Whilst you're looking to see what way the water goes don't forget light and power switches run the opposite way . We always tell people that it's because the electricity runs on the top part of the wires .
northie is offline  
Dec 11th, 2015, 01:42 AM
  #33  
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"don't forget light and power switches run the opposite way..."

Oh, this means I'm going to be an absolute wreck LOL! At least I already have the plug adaptors at the ready (ask me about the time we went to Italy and I had forgotten to pack the continental plug adaptors; the hotel didn't have any, and I spent a bunch of hours traipsing all over Florence to find one and I finally did at some outdoor stand near the Duomo...seems amusing now, but at the time...)

I suspect we'll definitely do some sort of plant life exploration and we're a sucker for gardens (and for me a petting zoo or "petting farm" is all it takes to amuse me for hours) so thanks for those additionals.

As to the "angel's trumpets" we do not have any on our property and I've been told the sap can be nasty but they are all over the place down here so obviously manageable.

I'm beginning to wonder now if I should try to write some sort of trip report. Mine are usually not very interesting to many since I rarely talk about "yummy foods" and such but since everyone has been so helpful I am thinking why not?

Thanks so VERY much for the kind thoughts and suggestions.
Dukey1 is offline  
Dec 11th, 2015, 09:04 AM
  #34  
 
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Dukey -I'm sure that I can remember reading at least one very amusing and informative TR from you - opera in Italy perhaps?

As for a lack of reference to "yummy foods" as in IRL we need a varied diet here too!

I'm sure that an Aussie TR from you would be just bonza!
annhig is offline  
Dec 11th, 2015, 11:21 AM
  #35  
 
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Trip Reports are like Forest Gump's chocolates, you never know what you'll get.

Some are cloyingly sweet, with "yummy & awesome" oozing from the first bite. White chocolate, with soft strawberry filling.

Every now & again there's a spicy chilli chocolate, surprising & delightful.

A few are like dense toffee, covered in the "hundreds & thousands" of
minutiae & sticking to our teeth.

Some are sharp & bitter, malcontent & complaint snapping like peanut brittle.

Some gems are an interesting & complex mix of observations, wrapped in a realistic overview & trimmed with an optimistic outlook. These are the luscious ginger in dark chocolate in my box.

Tastes differ & the variety we all contribute to the TR box make it an interesting assortment.

I enjoy some enormously & hunt for more; others I put aside after a bite & some only need a glance for me to leave them for someone else.

I like making my chocolate Trip Reports. As much as anything, they're a way to remember a trip. And if someone picks up something useful, or has a memory revived, that's a bonus.
Bokhara2 is offline  
Dec 11th, 2015, 01:42 PM
  #36  
 
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Bokhara2, you are hilarious; I love this! And you're making my mouth water...
tripplanner001 is offline  
Dec 11th, 2015, 04:58 PM
  #37  
 
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annhig- bonza - good god I don't think I've heard that said that for years and my kids (in their 40s ) wouldn't even know it .
So true Bokhara each to her own !
northie is offline  
Dec 11th, 2015, 09:16 PM
  #38  
 
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Ah yes, Northie,

Bonza, Bewdy, Strewth, Stone the crows; crikey, and best of all ..."G'day Mates" ... The equivalent of a Collins/ Macquarie street politician or a tourist attempting to ingratiate itself.

Top it off with a new ( shudder ) Akubra, moleskins, a Winchcombe Carson shirt, AML&F notebook & RMs or Baxters & they're the perfect farce.

We should send them an episode of "Dad & Dave" as an elocution & language coach
Bokhara2 is offline  
Dec 12th, 2015, 05:31 AM
  #39  
 
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Bonza, Bewdy, Strewth, Stone the crows; crikey, and best of all ..."G'day Mates" ... The equivalent of a Collins/ Macquarie street politician or a tourist attempting to ingratiate itself.>>

oh dear, 1 must have been watching too much Crocodile Dundee! [or was it Dame Edna?]
annhig is offline  
Dec 12th, 2015, 12:45 PM
  #40  
 
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Crocodile Dundee & Steve Irwin, most likely, Annhig.

"Mate" is quite commonly used by Aussie men, but one needs to understand the subtleties. Of the relationship, intent & nuances, not to mention pronunciation & inflection
Bokhara2 is offline  

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