SO WHERE THE BLOODY HELL ARE YOU?

Mar 3rd, 2006, 08:59 AM
  #41  
 
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It would be a bit like a promo from NYC showing all the sights, nicely spiffed up, then an New Yawker yelling "Where the F*** are ya?"

I prefer Chicago over NYC for the same reason. It's the attitude, not the profanity.
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Mar 3rd, 2006, 11:45 AM
  #42  
 
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Lorikeet, what angst are you talking about? There was not post that had angst in it.
I think that the add does show that there is a wider gulf between Australians and Americans than you think and that Australians are really more like the English than anyone else despite attempts by all and sundry to try and change our spelling and grama :0) to engulf the Americanisms into it.
I once said "damn"at home as a child and spent 3 hours in my room for swearing. However "bloody" is, and always has been, an acceptable adjective to just about everything in Australia and more often than not in NZ, England. It has become a more or less accepted part of our lazy speech in a way and is used to emphasize many conditions - it just depends on how it is said.
I must say though that I do not find the word "bloody" anything like the use of the word F..K as the latter does have connotations and has meaning and the constant use of that word in films makes me sick actually.
I don't particularly find an add using bloody particularly clever nor would I have thought that the use of it would encourage anyone to explore the rest of our uniqueness both in speech and attitudes but I too am not a member of the tourist board. I would have thought though that they could have come up with something that was broader in terms of interests and culture and not pin pointed a particular age group. It may be of interest to the bronzed, trim, fit water loving age group whose vocabulary is more expressive but it would not do anything for me who would be interested in other things about Australia. There is also the generational thing here to - I would not be accepting of a young person saying to me " where the bloody hell are you" however I would be more accepting of it if it was said by someone either my own age or older and certainly only from someone I knew particularly well and who I knew to be saying it tongue in cheek. I still am of the belief that a younger person should hold some respect when talking to older people or those people you don't know. So in that light I feel that the add is just another stupid attempt at humour by some younger add person. It is not clever, nor is it funny and I don't think that we, in Australia, need to resort to something like that when there are a myriad of things that are far more attractive and unique that could have been used.
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Mar 3rd, 2006, 12:54 PM
  #43  
 
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Actually I think I'd find a NYC "Where the f*** are ya?" ad somewhat endearing - New York is known as a city whose people like to call a spade a shovel and it's part of the city's image. Or self-image, maybe. Anyone contemplating a visit though will know or should know that it's also a city of vast cultural riches and immense diversity.

A favourite NYC joke at one time was the one about the Canadian tourist who approaches a guy in Union Square and says diffidently "Excuse me, sir - can you tell me the way to Battery Park, or should I just go f*** myself now?"
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Mar 3rd, 2006, 12:56 PM
  #44  
 
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BTW, thanks, fuzzylogic. Liz and I have been trading insults for a while now, so in response to bhuty's concerns about political banter I can only plead that Pat's reference to their state's Labor premier was to good an opporunity to pass up.
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Mar 3rd, 2006, 01:59 PM
  #45  
 
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You forgot to mention Neil that we also trade recipes as well as insults. So what do that say about us?
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Mar 4th, 2006, 09:18 AM
  #46  
 
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Should I ask where pavlova was invented or would that be too much?
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Mar 4th, 2006, 11:35 AM
  #47  
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Pavlova said to be invented in New Zealand as "meringue cake" and adapted in Perth, Australia. Named Pavlova in Australia in honour of visiting Russian ballet dancer, Anna Pavlova, back in 1920's.

Funny you should mention it, mlgb, only the other day I had some US visitors dying to try it - after a search of all likely local outlets around Cairns it's nowhere to be seen these days (not talking about the cement-like, over-sweetened meringue shells available in supermarkets). Ended up making them one myself, complete with dripping passionfruit. They loved it.
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Mar 4th, 2006, 12:58 PM
  #48  
 
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Stop, you are making me hungry!

Kiwi slices on top?
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Mar 4th, 2006, 01:22 PM
  #49  
 
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It HAS to be passionfruit and strawberries or some berry fruit.
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Mar 5th, 2006, 01:34 AM
  #50  
 
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"So where the Bloody Hell are you? "

I thought the ad was a bit crass when I saw it on TV last night.I agree with the poster who suggested the bloody hell would be better placed elsewhere in the ad.

Ending the ad with a simple "So where are you"? would work better for me.

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Mar 5th, 2006, 01:27 PM
  #51  
 
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As a new recruit to Fodors I just HAD to look up "Australia" being an Aussie. I am now sitting here p.s.ing myself laughing - no not at the ad, that was great, but at how Australians will argue about ANYTHING. Oh how I miss home. Especially after watching that ad. Only one problem, the girl at the end sounds like a moron. You need conviction in your tone when you say "where the bloody hell are you? its not exactly a term of endearment now is it? its meant as WHERE THE BLOODY HELL ARE YOU? as in get your a..se here this minute. So enough said, fabulous ad, just wish they would send it here to the UK - so I could watch it more. Cheers.
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Mar 5th, 2006, 09:59 PM
  #52  
 
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jjah: Know that feeling well darl. so you can write in here any time you want and I will oblige with a bloody here and there for you:
By the way "What the bloody hell are you doing over in the dank and dark old blighty"?
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Mar 5th, 2006, 10:38 PM
  #53  
 
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Thanks LizF, we got sent here on assignment for 2 years and now 4 years later we are still stuck here. Still it beats where we had to live in the States! It's a beautiful country if it wasn't so FULL of people whinging about it. I have never lived anywhere (and I've lived in 8 different countries) where the first question I'm asked is, Why on earth would you want to live here? Well ok, its a fair question really, why the hell would I (I don't) but its sad that no one has any national pride. Especially compared with the Aussies who would make your ear bleed about how wonderful our country is. Lets face it anytime someone goes to our country, all we ask them - or should I say grill them with is : DID YOU HAVE A GREAT TIME? DIDN'T YOU JUST LOVE IT? WHAT DID YOU SEE ETC. Poor bastards never get a chance to even hint that their holiday might have sucked. Hope you had a great day. Cheers
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Mar 6th, 2006, 11:12 AM
  #54  
 
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I am quite sure that you will see this add over there or if not that add then they will dream up some other equally stupid add for you so you can get homesick everyday. But perhaps we could ask you to take a little time and write to Australia House suggesting that there could be some improvements in these advertisements.
When you think of it, over the years it has been pretty pathetic, first we had "Hogan putting a 'shrimp'on the Barby" and until this one I cannot remember what the others were but obviously not memorable enough. Surely we can come up with something better than a bikini clad person on a beach - there are thousands of beaches in the world with people in small bikinis around. The Northern Territory Tourism Board came up with a good catchy add saying that " you will never, never know if you never, never go" which was clever as it was taken off the theme that the Northern Territory is sometimes called the "never never". However that was more a home grown theme really but it was at least going in the right direction.
Perhaps the Tourism Board could get more really good tips from ex-pats who constantly recall the things that they remember with longing of times in Australia and come up with something unique for a change. Anyway hopeyouhadagoodweekend and do have a bloody good week ahead.
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Mar 6th, 2006, 12:38 PM
  #55  
 
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Clearly Liz you are a genius. If ONLY they had asked me earlier. I actually remember the Never Never ad - it was great. But what makes me truly proud and I mean this most sincerely, is to see three idiotic bimbos in a pink convertible driving along, singing, (out of key) in a very strong Aussie accent advertising Sheila's Wheels insurance here in the U.K. Good god. Whilst I know that they are not advertising Australia as such, they are in a backhand way and I for one am truly mortified. (If you can't imagine it, just think Kylie M, about 20 years ago in Neighbours x 3). In America I was constantly asked why we didn't sound like Steve Urwin (sp?) the Crocodile Guy, and now this. Has the world gone completely mad? Must we always be portrayed (especially in the U.K) as completely lacking in class, mannerless, crass, beer swilling, beach bum, sexist, idiots? Ok, Steve Urwin may fall into that category - but not all of us do - well most don't - ok, some don't.
It would be great to just once have a home grown advertisement shown outside the country that showed off more than how beautiful Australia is and how dopey we can sound. Still, I guess if the "Where the Bloody Hell are You" ad makes me homesick, perhaps it works after all.
If only Expats ruled the world. sigh.
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Mar 6th, 2006, 03:01 PM
  #56  
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Never fear,jjah, the ad is scheduled for UK TV; as well as US, China, Japan, India and Germany. Commiserations on your exile, have done that, too, in the Old Dart.

Theme of latest ad seems to be almost a repetition of the Paul Hogan ad of the 80's. "We've poured you a beer.." then it was "We've put an extra shrimp on the barbie". Now that was cringable, but the ad was a huge success, could have had something to do with Hogan's popularity overseas as Crocodile Dundee. When it screens in the UK, do let us know what the Poms think.
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Mar 6th, 2006, 04:26 PM
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If I were American I'd be insulted that the ad agency thought that I wouldn't be able to understand "prawn" and so substituted "shrimp". Nothing new, though. Hogan's movie was titled "Crocodile" Dundee in the States - the distributor worried that without the quote marks the paying public would think it was a wildlife documentary.

Steve Irwin and Paul Hogan are what I think of as "professional Australians", like that clown Rolf Harris who settled in the UK decades ago. No wonder we have a dodgy image. Then there are the expats who go native, like the actors Leo McKern (of "Rumpole of the Bailey" fame) and Anthony LaPaglia - they're no help, because nobody knows they're Australian anyway.

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Mar 6th, 2006, 05:33 PM
  #58  
 
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Welcome to the Aussie / Expat Forum....

JJah,

I know most Aussies find Steve Irwin annoying and a bad representation, but you have to realize many Americans find him adorable. Yes, I know...it's shocking...but true.

I was on a business trip (famil) with the Tourism Board on the Queenslander and asked where we (agents) were headed next and when I said "the Australia Zoo" they were shocked into silence for nearly a full minute.

Then came a barrage of questions, most of which could be boiled down to "WHY?"
(this was prior to the dangling of his kid over the crocs, btw).

Simple really...Americans are intrigued and LOVE accents; especially an Aussie one (although they are frequently confused and will ask someone if they're English, and that just opens up another can of worms we won't get into)!

But really, I think it's his childlike enthusiasm for what he does; it's not an act, he really is that passionate about what he does for a living, and how many of us can say that?!

I actually didn't realize HOW popular he was until a year or so ago when the Australian Tourist Board had an event called "G'Day LA". The beginning portion was a trade show for travel industry personnel and afterwards there was a show open to the general public featuring Steve-O and assorted animals.
This was to benefit his conservation program.

I was astounded at the crowds out front -- a Humvee LIMO pulled up with several families inside, spilling out like a clown car in the circus! And the kids!! Hundreds of them, all excited to meet their "idol" Steve. (and he's REALLY great with them, btw).

The first four rows of the theatre were reserved and not for the VIPS as is usually the case -- they were reserved for several local schools. I thought that was just great!

So while he may not be well liked at home, he's a great ambassador for Australia. As was Paul Hogan; I believe the numbers either doubled or tripled for visitors to Oz during his commericals. (oh, and I guess I shouldn't forget "Sydney" the Qantas koala...remember "I HATE Qantas". Very successful campaign.

Regards,

Melodie
Certified Aussie Specialist
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Mar 6th, 2006, 08:14 PM
  #59  
 
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OK, Melodie, you win. I think we have to conclude that what makes a lot of Australians cringe can be a real crowd-puller for tourism purposes. And that might just apply to the current ads. If the tourism authority was paying me, I know what I'd do.

Some of the most sophisticated, artistically filmed and expensive ads on TV have failed. You know the kind - looks really pretty, but you can never remember what it was selling. And some of the loudest, crudest and cheapest ads have been super-successful. One Australian ad agency chief has become very rich on that philosophy.

On Steve Irwin, I have to agree, I guess. I once saw him on "Oprah" (and no, stop right there, that's NOT one of my secret vices) and I couldn't believe what was going on. OK, a guest could flip a coin on "Oprah" and her audience would wet themselves with excitement (I'd like to know what drugs they hand out before the show!), but I had to admit that the bloke is a natural entertainer.

One thing I noticed is that many Americans think of Australia (if they think of it) as a kind of innocent frontier society - "Like it used to be here before all the shit happened", one lady said to me. I couldn't work out what the "shit" was - she was living in an idyllic corner of Colorado - but there you go. And people don't travel overseas to go somewhere that's pretty much like home - they want exotica (preferably safe exotica). You can advertise the Opera House, but there's not much point plugging the operas and ballets -the US has plenty of excellent opera and dance companies.

The problem for the tourist commission is that while Australia ranks No 1 on American travellers' "places I'd like to go" list, few actually do, mainly because it's seen as just too far - even though Sydney is no further from LA than Berlin, say. I think the aim of these ads is to trigger a "well, why not?" response - a buying decision. Any good saleperson knows about the need to get a buyer over that hurdle.

Maybe the same goes for the UK market, for instance. TV soaps like "Neighbours" get a big yawn from most Australians, but they have big audiences in Britain. "Eastenders" with sunshine and lots of tanned, blonde, nubile lassies. Busloads of British tourists actually visit the street where the location shots are filmed, and they pay good money to do it! What works, works.
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Mar 7th, 2006, 12:55 AM
  #60  
 
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At the moment, its WA that is promoting itself heavily in the UK with the slogan 'The Real Australia'.

In the past I thought the Queensland slogan of 'Beautiful one day, Perfect the next' was quite catchy.

I think they should look at the different overseas markets and produce different campaigns

E.g. in the UK I think you could highlight the possibility of visiting family & friends that you've always promised to visit, so you could use the slogan 'where the bloody hell are you' in a more personal way.

In Japan, highlight the golf, the unique wildlife, restaurants like Tetsuya's and the Japanese speaking staff in the shops.

Similarly with the Chinese, highlight the large Chinese communities with all the corresponding restaurants.

For the American market just use the Steve Irwin type approach and stress its not as far away as you think.

jjah, with regards to national pride in the UK, I think there's a lot more than you imagine.

I think the UK is very similar to Australia, as we don't need to fly flags everywhere or sing the national anthem at school with our hands on our hearts to feel pride. We often insult or complain about a lot of our institutions but if you, as an outsider started rubbishing the country and the royal family then I think you'd see a different side.

For me and I think the majority of British, the weather is the number one reason to want to live abroad, its certainly not economic.

Geordie
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