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NZ - Before I get in too deep, itinerary help appreciated!

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Jul 11th, 2018, 04:13 PM
  #41
 
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I just wanted to add a couple of locations to Crellston's incredible list. But I have no first-hand experience of them.

In Aoraki Mt. Cook the DOC campsite is White Horse Hill Campground. It adjoins the public parking lot for several popular walking tracks, including the Hooker Valley Track and Kea Point Track. Presently, it's "no bookings required, first come, first served." This is a popular campsite.
https://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-re...ll-campground/
It's about a 10-minute drive from the village.

There are also powered campervan sites at Glentanner Park Centre:
https://www.glentanner.co.nz/power-sites/
Glentanner is on Mt. Cook Road (SH80), about halfway from the turnoff from the main highway (SH8) to Aoraki Mt. Cook Village.

Here's a link to info on Aoraki Mt. Cook's walking tracks:
https://www.doc.govt.nz/aoraki-walking-tracks

Freedom camping is prohibited at Tekapo township, but there are powered sites at Lake Tekapo Holiday Park.
Lake Tekapo Motels & Holiday Park
https://mackenzienz.com/info/responsible-camping/

There's also a freedom camping site for self-contained vehicles near Lake Pukaki:
https://www.campermate.co.nz/blog/fr...ng-lake-pukaki
https://www.rankers.co.nz/experience...ng_Hayman_Road
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Aug 5th, 2018, 10:15 AM
  #42
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Okay my expert fodorites, I've reworked my itinerary. Airfare and one-way van rentals are more expensive from Queenstown so I'm going to do a round-trip from Christchurch. With the money saved, I'm going to put it towards a Premium 2-berth campervan with Maui so we are guaranteed a van less than a year old. I really like the setup of their van, but they have gotten a lot of negative reviews on Rankers so hopefully this will better our chances of a smoother trip. Here is my most recent itinerary with a few questions in italics:

1 – Fly into Chch
2 – Pick up van. Drive to Hokitika via Arthur’s Pass (3:00) (possibly visit glow worms)

3 – Okarita (1:45) or Fox (2:15) (Hokitika Gorge on the way)
Which has a better campsite?

4 – Wanaka (4:00)
Cinema Paradiso

5 - Wanaka
Puzzling World
Glendhu Bay Lakefront Track
Would this be the best place to do some easy kayaking?

6 – Queenstown/Glenorchy (1:15)
7 – Queenstown/Glenorchy

8 -Te Anau (3:00) (Maybe glow worms?)
9 - (Milford Sound)
10 - Curio Bay (3:00) Penguins in the evening

11 – Dunedin (2:45) – Leave by 11:30 to take the 3:00 Elm Wildlife Tour
Do I have enough time to visit Cathedral Caves in the morning (depending on the tide)

12 - Oamaru - (1:30) - evening Little Blue Penguin Tour
visit Moeraki on the way

13- Mt Cook – (2:30)
White Horse Hill Campground

14 – Mt. Cook
Hooker Valley Track

15 – Mt Cook
Glacier float trip
I put the extra night in Mt Cook because I figure we’ll be tired by then. Should I put that extra night somewhere else, such as The Catlins?

16- Christchurch (4:30
Visit Lake Tekapo on the way
If we get to Chch early enough, return van and stay in a hotel

17 –Fly back to Auckland for 8pm flight home
What time do you recommend getting a flight back to Auckland?

Thanks in advance for taking the time to read this!
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Aug 5th, 2018, 11:14 AM
  #43
 
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Can't help with which places have better campsites; I think your itinerary looks full on, but pretty good.

I always suggest two nights at the glaciers though, which gives you one full day to explore - there's a lot to do in the area, but just one night there won't give you much time. On the upside, you're only coming from Hoki, so you'll have several hours and lots of daylight.

I assume you're staying in Curio Bay before driving to Dunedin? If that's the case, yes you can probably fit in Cathedral Caves - access isn't available until 7:30 am, it takes about 30 minutes each way to walk to the caves, and then you have a two hour drive to Dunedin afterwards. Subject to tides of course.

This map of the Catlins might help:

Official website for the Catlins, New Zealand ? Tourism and Community Information

As for what time to leave Christchurch to get to Auckland for your international flight, I'd probably leave around 4-5 pm at the latest. It's a one hour flight, then you'll need to walk about 10-15 minutes between terminals. There's also the issue of late check out from your Christchurch accommodation, which could be a deciding factor.

I like to leave sufficient time to enjoy Air NZ's Koru Lounge (accessible if you're Star Alliance Gold or have status with Air New Zealand or are flying Premium Economy or Business class on Air NZ).
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Aug 5th, 2018, 06:15 PM
  #44
 
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Will your trip start on February 22 as you previously indicated? If so, then the timing is good for Mt. Cook as you'll be there around the time of the new moon (March 7), which is optimum for stargazing (if the night is clear).

With respect to Cathedral Caves, you can find NZ tide table predictions at this link:
https://www.niwa.co.nz/services/onli...ide-forecaster
As you get closer to the date of your trip the Cathedral Caves website will also post tide times.
It looks like on March 4, which is when I'm guessing you'll be driving from Curio Bay to Dunedin, low tide might be around 8:30 a.m.

Where do you plan on staying in Dunedin?/Where will the Elm tour be picking you up from?

I think driving from Curio Bay to Dunedin for your 3 p.m. Elm Wildlife Tour might be cutting it close. Because there are at the minimum a couple of other places you'll want to stop along the way in addition to CC. If you visit Cathedral Caves, you'd want to allocate this detour around 1.5 hours (more or less, depending on the weather). Because you'll get off from the main route, drive a short distance to the parking lot, then from the parking lot walk about 15 minutes down to the beach, then walk along the beach to the caves, then spend time looking at/photographing the caves. If the weather's poor, you'll have no trouble making it quick but if it's nice, you might want to sit and enjoy the beautiful views because the beach itself is beautiful. Hopefully, you won't be bothered by sandflies.

There are many places to stop in the Catlins which could make this drive from Curio Bay to Dunedin much longer, but you'll definitely want to pull over for the view from Florence Hill Lookout (this won't take long). I would say Nugget Point Lighthouse is also a must, but this detour requires more time. You'll need to get off the main route (SH1), drive in the direction of Kaka Point/Nugget Point Lighthouse, then to the Nugget Point Lighthouse parking lot, then you'd walk 15 minutes to the lighthouse for the view of the "nuggets" below. Another place I enjoy is the Lost Gypsy Gallery in Papatowai.

I'd also recommend following the SSR from Kaka Point to Dunedin's Tunnel Beach, then leaving the SSR and driving in the direction of St. Clair Beach. This means at Lake Waihola, you'll leave SH1 and turn toward the coast, then drive north along the coast (20 km of coastline) from Taieri Mouth (the mouth of the Taeri River) to Brighton/Ocean View, then toward Tunnel Beach, then toward the southern beach suburbs of St. Clair and St. Kilda (there's a large holiday park at St. Kilda). Even if you don't want to walk the Tunnel Beach Track, this is the more scenic route. If you don't turn toward the coast at Lake Waihola, you'll stay on SH1, which becomes a multilane motorway that leads down into the busiest part of Dunedin's city center, where you'll share the roadway with large trucks as well as many cars--it's not a scenic or serene approach (quite the opposite, especially after the relative calm of the Catlins).

You'd be able to enjoy the drive from Curio Bay to Dunedin more and make more scenic stops if you budget two nights for Dunedin (doing the Elm tour on your second afternoon-evening, thus not being rushed on that first day). Two nights in Dunedin also doubles your chances of better weather. But I don't know where you'll get that extra day. I'll think about it more.

I remember in your earlier post you were considering coming south first to better your chances of seeing more penguins. I guess you must have changed your mind?

Last edited by Diamantina; Aug 5th, 2018 at 06:27 PM.
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Aug 5th, 2018, 10:05 PM
  #45
 
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I would subtract a night from Aoraki Mt. Cook and add it to Dunedin, so you can take your time on that drive from Curio Bay to Dunedin. You could see more, stop more, do more, take more breaks, and not have to worry about rushing (as some of the roads are winding). After a one night stay in Curio Bay, you might enjoy a more relaxed two night stay in Dunedin, without have to continue after just one night. if you have time to spare, you can explore a bit of the Otago Peninsula on your own.

Another option is to spend a night at Kaka Point, which is little more than 1.5 hours to the south of Dunedin, which will make for a shorter, more relaxed drive up to Dunedin the next day. You'd easily make your 3 p.m. Elm tour. Kaka Point is next to Nugget Point, so you'd be prefectly positioned for viewing sunrise from Nugget Point Lighthouse. If you'd like to see what it looks like, google "sunrise at nugget point". Here's what I found:
https://www.gettyimages.co.nz/detail...mage/533137410

Aoraki Mt. Cook is one of my favorite places but it's also extremely popular. Given how busy it now gets, two days here might be enough for you. Because it's not that far from Oamaru, you'll have plenty of time to walk a couple of tracks on that first day. The Glacier Explorers excursion will only take a few hours (I did it many years ago, but it seems it took about three hours), so you'd have time to walk on that second day as well. The Hooker Valley track takes 3 hours return (or less), Kea Point Track takes 1 hour return, Governors Bush Walk 45 minutes. The sun won't set until around 8 p.m., so you'll have at least 13 hours of daylight (providing the skies are not full of dark clouds or rain).
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Aug 6th, 2018, 06:47 AM
  #46
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Thanks so much for your feedback. Great advice. I'll take a closer look and see how I can make it fit. I did want to try and see the penguins in the evening in Curio Bay so maybe we'll stay in Kaka Point our second night as you suggest. I decided to do the trip counterclockwise as I hear that's more scenic. I got in touch with Elm Wildlife Tours and they said one week either way wouldn't make a difference in March. I haven't worked out the particulars of where we'll be staying in Dunedin and where they'll be picking us up. I may just e-mail them again and ask for their suggestion since they were so responsive to my first e-mail. I may also change my first night's destination in the campervan to Punakaika instead of Hokitika. And yay! New moon! We will still be starting our trip on 2/22 so that's fantastic! Maybe we can also head back to Christchurch later in the afternoon and just return the van the morning of our departure the next day. That may give us a little more time in Mt. Cook. I know I'm missing out by only giving the glacier area an overnight stay, but I've seen glaciers and I don't want to take away from any of the other destinations I want to see. Te Anau is just to make the trip to Milford Sound shorter.
Thanks again! I'll be back.....
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Aug 6th, 2018, 07:39 PM
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Punakaiki is a great choice. The Pancake Rocks are a geological treasure and the setting is spectacular. At high tide, you can view blowholes (if you wish). While there, you might also enjoy the Pororari River Track, just one of several hiking trails the area offers.

Between Punakaiki and Greymouth, just south of Barrytown, there's a beach known for its photogenic sea stacks, Motukiekie Beach. But it can only be accessed at low tide.

Yes, I remember you weren't too interested in glaciers. One other large appeal of the glacier area is its temperate rainforests, but you'll experience these lush forests all along the West Coast (and I'm sure you've seen other temperate rainforests during your travels). The West Coast has a wild, rugged beauty to it. I love its rocky beaches.

Te Anau's nice. More than a base for visiting Milford Sound, a small town on a pretty lake, with glowworms, rare birds, walking tracks. You'll probably enjoy it.

That great news that Elm says you shouldn't have trouble viewing Hoiho (YEPs) in early March. I know you're both walkers but did I mention that the tour requires some uphill walking (unless you sign up for the "lite" tour)? Their website also mentions this.

The few times I've taken the Elm tour they've picked up passengers from Dunedin Holiday Park, which is behind pretty St. Kilda Beach (nearby John Wilson Drive is a great spot for viewing the sunrise). It's a large holiday park. Elm also picks up passengers from Portobello village, where there's another holiday park. I'm sure they can pick you up from anywhere central or along their regular route, or you can meet up with them if you're staying farther out. This is a link to a brochure that shows freedom camping and commercial campground locations, 7-Freedom-camping-flyer-2017.pdf You can read more about it on this link. As your Maui van will be self-contained, "...then you can generally freedom camp throughout the Dunedin area on gravelled or sealed council land set aside for parking. Look out for prohibited zones on the Otago Peninsula. No camping except in licensed holiday parks is permitted in these zones." I'd stick to the coastal areas, so you can skirt the busier, traffic-filled areas of the city center (which is even busier when the university students return and when there's a cruise ship in town). I'll try get back to you with more suggestions for parking your campervan.

The Otago Peninsula is also a great place for stargazing. If you decide to park your campervan at Portobello Village Tourist Park for your one night in Dunedin, and if the night is clear, you might want to drive over to Hoopers Inlet to view the night sky. It's about a 10-minute drive from the village (though take care driving along this somewhat curvy road). The Elm tour will also take you to Hoopers Inlet during the early part of your tour to view birdlife, so you can preview this drive. By early March, some of the migratory birds that spend their spring and summer here, such as Royal Spoonbills, might have already left for warmer climes, but there should still be lots of white-faced grey herons, pukeko, paradise shelducks, black swans, stilts, shags, oyster catchers, spur winged lovers and gulls. You might find this link interesting: https://www.dunedinnz.com/visit/see-...rs-destination

Another interesting place on the Otago Peninsula is Penguin Place. Their tour takes 90 minutes and begins with an introduction to the Hoiho/YEP. Then you walk along tracks and through camouflaged tunnels along their large working sheep farm trying to spot Hoiho/YEP. Sightings here could be good or not as its penguin numbers have been falling. However, it also runs the major rehabilitation center for penguins found malnourished, starving, underweight or that are recovering from injury. Penguins in trouble from along the Dunedin coast and the Catlins are taken here to recover. Dunedin also has a wildlife hospital that treats injured or diseased penguins, but after they've been treated and need more recuperation, they're sent to Penguin Place. So PP plays a major role in local penguin conservation. On one of my visits there were more than 80 penguins in their rehab center. Tours usually include a visit to their rehabilitation center. If interested, it's best to do one of their late afternoon tours. Of course, if you're only spending one day/night in Dunedin to do the Elm tour, this won't be possible.

Here's a link to a brochure for campervan parking in or near 13-Freedom%20Camping%20Brochure.pdf If you'll be spending the night at Kaka Point, you might want to go to the penguin hide at Roaring Bay in the late afternoon. The turn off for Roaring Bay will be before the Nugget Point parking lot. I feel obliged to remind you of how rare and solitary the Yellow Eyed Penguins are because you might have a long, cold wait to see one or a few. I'd wear warm attire and maybe bring a thermos with a warm drink. The last time I was at Curio Bay to watch the penguins come in (coincidentally also in March), I sat around for hours as the late afternoon became early evening and the day/night grew darker and colder. Even though I was warmly dressed, I wished I'd had a fleece blanket to toss over my legs (I was seated on a rock).

Luckily, you're planning well in advance and you'll have the freedom of having your own accommodation on wheels, so you don't have to worry about booking holiday camps now, so you can still think about you itinerary.

Last edited by Diamantina; Aug 6th, 2018 at 08:15 PM.
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Aug 9th, 2018, 05:38 PM
  #48
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Thank you so much for all this fantastic information. I can see we probably do need two days for Dunedin. Back to the drawing board, but I do feel like I'm getting closer, thanks to all your wonderful advice.
​​​​​​​Laurie
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Aug 11th, 2018, 06:25 PM
  #49
 
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You're welcome. Sorry, I didn't intend to confuse you more by mentioning Penguin Place, just wanted to let you know of possibilities. The Otago Peninsula has many attractions. But the weather is unpredictable at any time of year. For instance, we've been enjoying a mild winter, largely sunny and dry, with a multitude of flowers blooming all winter long, but other winters bring snow or rain storms. Luckily, March is usually very pleasant and subject to fewer extremes, the summer coastal winds also die down as we enter autumn.

By spending that second night in the Catlins in Kaka Point, you'll definitely be able to see more of the Catlins. You do have hard choices to make.

Meanwhile, Oamaru's first Little Blue Penguin of the season has already hatched:
https://www.odt.co.nz/regions/north-...earance-colony
At Dunedin's Pilots Beach, the LBPs (Maori name: kororā) are also on track. Hopefully, there will be enough food to sustain their growing population.
https://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/g...nsula-penguins
You might enjoy this 2017 article on NZ penguins from New Zealand Geographic:
https://www.nzgeo.com/stories/life-on-the-edge/

I just noticed you asked about kayaking. Rosco's Kayaks' tours of Milford Sound are popular. Real Journeys' overnight cruises of Milford and Doubtful Sounds also include an hour of kayaking. In Glenorchy, Rippled Earth offers kayak tours. Kayaking is a popular way of exploring the birdlife of Okarito Lagoon (but don't forget about the sandflies). There's also kayaking on Tasman Glacier Lake in Aoraki Mt. Cook. I'm sure you can kayak in Wanaka, but be mindful of winds.

Last edited by Diamantina; Aug 11th, 2018 at 06:52 PM.
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Sep 23rd, 2018, 07:24 PM
  #50
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Back again....
Will it be necessary to book our campsites ahead of time since we're traveling in the busy time of Feb to March? On the one hand, I like the idea of not having to worry about it while we're there - once less thing to stress over. But on the other hand, I only want to stay in holiday parks when we need to charge up the van. Since I've only been given an approximation for how often that would be, I hate to book a holiday park ahead of time and then have to pass up a beautiful DOC spot because our van doesn't need charging yet. What would you recommend?
Thanks,
Laurie
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Sep 24th, 2018, 01:17 AM
  #51
 
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This DOC website says you need to book some serviced campsites for peak season.
https://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-re...te/campervans/
The South Island Conservation Campsite brochure on Page 2 goes on to say, "Bookings are required for all Serviced campsites and for some Scenic and Standard campsites in peak season (usually 1 October – 30 April). Most bookings can be made at booking.doc.govt.nz or at a DOC Visitor Centre."
https://www.doc.govt.nz/globalassets...uth-island.pdf
Maybe contact the DOC Visitor Centres for more specific information (DOC Visitor Centres are listed on the above brochure).

Remember, as your campervan will be self-contained, you'll also have the option of freedom camping.
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Sep 24th, 2018, 07:43 AM
  #52
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Thanks, Diamantina. I just found out that I will also be competing with the Godzone Challenge 3/10 - 3/17 in Aoraki. We will be there 3/7-3/9. Plus I hear it's Chinese New Year. Probably best to play it safe and book some spots now, even if it's only as a back-up.
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Sep 24th, 2018, 04:18 PM
  #53
 
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My husband and I visited Kaikoura during the Godzone Challenge four years ago (2014). I noticed most of the competitors seemed to be camping in tents in a public area (it was a large grassy lawn). It's an unusual race in that GODZone teams "are expected to travel day and night. Decisions to rest and sleep are left solely to the discretion of the teams themselves." We were in Kaikoura for a couple of nights and only saw them briefly as they didn't stick around long. The teams will try to complete the race in 3 to 7 days. You can read about it here:
About GODZone | GODZone Adventure Race

If I'm not mistaken, DOC's White Horse Hill Campsite in Aoraki Mt. Cook is first come, first serve.
https://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-re...ll-campground/

Last edited by Diamantina; Sep 24th, 2018 at 05:18 PM.
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Sep 24th, 2018, 05:15 PM
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There are no Department of Conservation campsites within the Dunedin City boundary (which is huge). However, Dunedin allows freedom camping for self-contained vehicles "on any gravelled or sealed Dunedin City Council land set aside for parking except in: cemeteries, scenic reserves, prohibited zones on the Otago Peninsula and outside the designated areas at Ocean View Recreation Reserve and Warrington Domain." This means you can even park on a quiet city street, as long as there are no parking restrictions, you're legally parked, not parked on grass, not blocking driveways or other access to the property, not blocking traffic, your vehicle doesn't extend beyond the white lines, and as long as there are no more than three campervans within a 50m radius. The complete rules are here (scroll down to "Certified Self-Contained campers", also read "Prohibited Areas").
Freedom Camping - Dunedin City Council

In Dunedin, as you'll have a self-contained vehicle, you can freedom camp in one of the pull-outs above Smails Beach, which is in a semi-rural area at the start of the Otago Peninsula. There are only a few pull outs above Smails Beach, signs will indicate where self-contained vehicles are allowed, and where freedom camping is prohibited. It should be quiet here. The beach is popular with surfers and walkers, some accompanied by dogs, on sunny days. It's a great beach for walking during low tide.

Or you can park in the parking area for John Wilson Drive, which is above St. Kilda Beach; though this area is closer to residential areas and busier. The last half of John Wilson Drive is closed off to vehicle traffic after 3 p.m. so you'd want to avoid parking too far down.

Not sure where you can freedom camp on the Otago Peninsula, but do avoid the sites listed under "Prohibited Areas".

When in doubt about where you can freedom camp, enquire at local I-Site offices beforehand.

Regarding the White Horse Hill Campsite at Aoraki Mt. Cook, you might want to contact the local visitor site for more specific info.Aoraki / Mt Cook National Park Visitor Centre, Phone: +64 3 435 1186, Email: [email protected]

Last edited by Diamantina; Sep 24th, 2018 at 05:28 PM.
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Sep 27th, 2018, 04:54 PM
  #55
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Thanks for all the great information!
Laurie
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Oct 17th, 2018, 04:42 PM
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Piggybacking on to this post, as we plan to do a tour down south in March 2019. We will be towing a small caravan though rather than using a camper van. Is the road to Glenorchy fine for a vehicle towing a caravan, how about some of the other roads to DOC campsites?

Sorry Blackmons for intruding on your post.
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Oct 17th, 2018, 08:50 PM
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Is the road to Glenorchy fine for a vehicle towing a caravan

Nelsonian! You've not been to Glenorchy? Shame on you!

Yes, the road is fine for towing a caravan, especially for a Kiwi. It's us tourists you need to worry about.

The road is narrow and winding, but sealed. The hardest bit is keeping your eyes on the road; you don't want to be ogling the lake and end up in the drink.
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Oct 18th, 2018, 12:40 PM
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Melnq8. it will be 41 years in January 19 since we have been down to Queenstown and beyond, we went there on our honeymoon. I think we may have been to Glenorchy on the Earnslaw. Now I am retired we are going to do some exploring in our own country!!
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Oct 18th, 2018, 03:06 PM
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It's time nelsonian - get out there and enjoy your retirement! I look forward to reading about your adventures!
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Oct 31st, 2018, 09:21 AM
  #60
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Working on the southern portion of our trip. There seem to be a few options for driving from Te Anau to Curio Bay. Can you advise me as to which would be the most scenic route? I have read that the route from Invercargill to Curio Bay is mostly gravel and that it's better to go through Tokanui. We are hoping to view penguins in the evening.
Thanks,
Laurie
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