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A Return to New Zealand: North of the South (Island) and South of the North

A Return to New Zealand: North of the South (Island) and South of the North

Old Nov 5th, 2023, 03:14 PM
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A Return to New Zealand: North of the South (Island) and South of the North

In 2017, we walked the Milford Track for 4-5 days and then spent some time in the central and southern areas of the South Island. Trip report here: Sun, Sandflies and Sauvignon Blanc

We left wanting to see more. Earlier this year, I found a good deal on frequent flyer business class award tickets between San Francisco and Auckland for October. Plans began to fall into place.

We wanted to cover mostly new territory, so we decided to focus on far northern parts of the South Island and the very southern end of the North Island. This fit well with our interests in scenery, hiking/walking, and wine. We also wanted to give Auckland a second chance for a day or two at the end. It was pouring rain the last time we were there.

Our itinerary:
Nelson – 1 night to acclimate to the time change
Kaiteriteri – 4 nights for the Abel Tasman area
Blenheim area – 3 nights for seeing the wine country and a bit of the Marlborough Sounds
Wellington – 4 nights
Auckland – 2 nights prior to our return flight to the US

We were a little concerned about the timing – and particularly the “spring weather.” But when it comes to good FF awards, it’s catch as catch can, so we hoped for the best. We did have a couple of less-than-ideal weather days, but were very lucky for the most part. More on that as I go along. The big benefit of traveling in shoulder season was the lack of crowds.


Prelude
We live in the Chicago area. Because our FF awards were out of San Francisco, we had to buy separate tickets from/to Chicago. Accordingly, I wanted some buffer in the event of a flight delay, particularly at the beginning of the trip. So, we spent one night in San Francisco – arriving at 11 pm on a Monday night and departing for Auckland at 11 pm on Tuesday night.

The Grand Hyatt SFO is right at the airport, with its own stop on the Airtrain. Our room came with views of the international terminal and runway, along with binoculars and plane spotting guide!




On Tuesday afternoon, we took BART to the Embarcadero for a few hours of walking, followed by an excellent dinner at Kokkari Estiatorio.

Arrival
Our United flight to Auckland landed right on time and was the only international arrival right around then. With carry-on luggage only, we were the first from our plane at biosecurity. Having been to New Zealand before, we knew to clean up our hiking shoes before traveling. The agent to whom we presented our biosecurity questionnaire seemed happy to hear this, and we didn’t have to open up our bags for further inspection.

For the flight to Nelson, I booked flexible tickets on Air New Zealand for a small additional amount, enabling us to change to an earlier or later flight as needed. This worked last trip, and it worked again here, getting us to Nelson a couple hours earlier than planned. It was apparently a very windy day in the Nelson area – so much so that one of the flight attendants felt compelled to remind passengers about the air-sickness bags in the seat-back pockets.

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Old Nov 5th, 2023, 04:51 PM
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Nelson
We spent about 24 hours to acclimate to the time change.

We quite enjoyed walking around the city – in the sun – admiring the homes, architecture, gardens and parks, as well as a lovely lunch with Nelsonian and her husband at The Styx (thanks for coming in to meet us!). The chowder was one of the best meals we had on the trip – so good that I forgot to take a photo before diving in. Sorry.



South Street is New Zealand's oldest preserved street, with cottages dating to the 1860s.


South Street cottage.


We enjoyed Nelson's preserved Art Deco architecture


Trafalgar Street


Old St. John's, now an event space


Christ Church Cathedral


Gardens at the cathedral


Queen's Gardens


Queen's Gardens


Plaques at the seafront with the names of immigrant ships and their manifests


Early Settlers sculpture at the waterfront

Accommodation: Palazzo Motor Lodge
Very friendly, welcoming crew here, with lots of recommendations for the area. It’s right in central Nelson, so we could walk everywhere.

Notable meals:
The Styx – chowder!!
Urban Oyster Bar & Eatery

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Old Nov 5th, 2023, 10:06 PM
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I’ll be following along. It’s about time we got ourselves to NZ!

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Old Nov 6th, 2023, 06:16 AM
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I will be following along, too! So happy to see your report. As you know, I am in the midst of planning a trip to Australia and New Zealand for October/November 2024. I would love to hear details about the weather as you go along and what kind of clothing you brought. We will be in NZ in November so hopefully a bit warmer and dryer? I know you never know with weather. I thought about going in January/February or February/March, but want to avoid high-seasons crowds and higher prices.

I have already read your TR from your first trip, and it is very helpful and interesting!
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Old Nov 6th, 2023, 07:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Adelaidean
I’ll be following along. It’s about time we got ourselves to NZ!
Adelaidean: I'd say so! And it's quite a bit closer for you.

KarenWoo, thank you! I'm glad the previous report was useful. I think you'd asked me about the cost of our helicopter ride/landing. I tried to look for that but unfortunately couldn't find anything that far back. It was kind of a spur-of-the-moment decision. We hadn't really planned to do it but happened to pass through Fox Glacier on a nice day with no clouds and decided just to go for it.

Abel Tasman/Kaiteriteri
The Abel Tasman Track is one of New Zealand’s Great Walks. It is 60 kilometers in total, hugging the coast around Abel Tasman National Park (only the ends of the track are accessible by road). The full track takes 3-5 days. There are some DOC huts and campsites that hikers can reserve along the way. You can also do day hikes on portions of the track, using a water taxi service from to take you to your entry point of choice and pick you up at your end point.

We had originally planned to stay in Mapua Wharf but changed that a month or two prior to our trip so that we would be closer to Abel Tasman. Kaiteriteri is one of the primary gateways to Abel Tasman National Park. It also has an attractive beachfront setting. At low tide, we could walk all over the beach and out to some of the rock formations that ring it.


Kaiteriteri beach


At low tide, you can walk out to and around the rock formations


Kaiteriteri beach from the top of the rock in the previous photo


Low tide


Kaiteriteri beach - pretty empty in mid-October


Several of the water taxi/shuttle services leave right from the beach here

We used Sea Shuttle for our water transfers. The Sea Shuttle booth at Kaiteriteri happened to be the only one open when we first arrived, and they were very helpful with planning information. Wilson’s also provides similar services at similar costs. Both of their websites have a lot of information about possible excursions.

We considered excursions that also involved kayaking but ultimately determined that, given the wind and spring temperatures, it might be more enjoyable just to stay on land. So, we did two different hikes on different days. More to come on those – I need to sort through a lot of photos!
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Old Nov 6th, 2023, 07:27 AM
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Originally Posted by KarenWoo
I would love to hear details about the weather as you go along and what kind of clothing you brought. We will be in NZ in November so hopefully a bit warmer and dryer?
Overall, I'd say high temps were in the range of mid 50s to mid 60s, with some mornings in the 40s. We had some rain, but certainly not any more than we expected.

Traveling carry-on only was a challenge given that we were both hiking and spending time in cities. We did have washers/dryers in three of our five accommodations, so that helped a lot. I left the poles and boots at home, as we weren't going to be doing really strenuous hikes. For trails, I took one pair of versatile waterproof athletic shoes with good treads. For warmth and weather protection, I packed a lightweight down vest, a fleece sweatshirt and two lightweight, very packable jackets for rain and wind - and just layered as needed. I did not take rain pants, but I did have 2-3 quick dry pants (Orvis/Eddie Bauer type) that got a lot of use.
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Old Nov 6th, 2023, 08:59 AM
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Following. Sounds like you were luckier with the weather than we were.
And that is New Zealand for you. Four seasons in a day. If you don't like the weather just wait 10 minutes. What is the weather like today? Look outside the window. etc....
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Old Nov 6th, 2023, 12:52 PM
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Originally Posted by mlgb
Following. Sounds like you were luckier with the weather than we were.
And that is New Zealand for you. Four seasons in a day. If you don't like the weather just wait 10 minutes. What is the weather like today? Look outside the window. etc....
Yes, I can't really complain about the weather. We did have a couple of days with three seasons. Fortunately, no snow - other than a few visible peaks far in the distance.

Abel Tasman Coast Track - Apple Tree Bay to Anchorage: about 7 km, 2.5 hours
Apple Tree Bay is about 20-minute boat ride from Kaiteriteri. There’s a short bit of climbing to reach the track from the beach at Apple Tree Bay, and then a gradual descent down to the beach at Anchorage. Otherwise, this part of the track is relatively flat. A lot of this portion is wooded, but there are noticeable changes in foliage along the way depending on the elevation and orientation. There are nice views of the water and beaches in spots along the way.

As you can see from the photos, it was sunny and dry (what you can’t see is the wind!). We passed some people – both day hikers and those doing the full track (identifiable by their larger packs) – but overall it was pretty quiet.


The boat ride to Apple Tree Bay passes by the prominent Split Apple Rock. According to Maori legend, it was sliced in half by two feuding gods.


A lot of this portion of the track looks like this - and, yes, there's a pretty steep drop to one side.


Occasionally, there are nice views of the water and beaches through breaks in the trees.


Trails are well marked.


The vegetation starts to change as we get further north.


Weka are flightless birds about the size of a chicken. We saw them on most of our hikes. It's pretty apparent that they're used to getting handouts from the hikers. We didn't have anything to offer.


Best views come toward the end of the hike.


Anchorage beach, where we met the boat to return to Kaiteriteri.

Last edited by ms_go; Nov 6th, 2023 at 01:07 PM.
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Old Nov 6th, 2023, 01:51 PM
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This might sound like a silly question but I want to make sure I understand your hike from Apple Tree Bay to Anchorage. The boat drops you off at Apple Tree Bay and then picks you up at Anchorage. So you have no choice but to finish the hike once you start because you can't stop mid-way and get off the trail, right? Or, after going a short distance, you can't turn around and go back because the boat will have left. If it starts raining, for instance, you have to continue so it's imperative to have a daypack with raingear in case it rains. My husband hates the rain, so even with raingear, he would be miserable if we got stuck in rain on the trail.

Last edited by KarenWoo; Nov 6th, 2023 at 02:01 PM.
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Old Nov 6th, 2023, 01:58 PM
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"We considered excursions that also involved kayaking but ultimately determined that, given the wind and spring temperatures, it might be more enjoyable just to stay on land. So, we did two different hikes on different days. More to come on those – I need to sort through a lot of photos!"

I went on to Wilson's website and see that they offer 3.5 hour cruises that cruise the length of the coast from Kaiteriteri to Totaranui and return. This is something we would love to do. Do you think a winter coat would be necessary while out on the water if it's windy and chilly? Looks like there's indoor seating as well as outside seating, right? I prefer not to bring a winter jacket. We both have fleeces and waterproof windbreakers. I envision us taking a lot of boating trips while in NZ. We are not interested in kayaking.

Last edited by KarenWoo; Nov 6th, 2023 at 02:02 PM.
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Old Nov 6th, 2023, 02:29 PM
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Originally Posted by KarenWoo
This might sound like a silly question but I want to make sure I understand your hike from Apple Tree Bay to Anchorage. The boat drops you off at Apple Tree Bay and then picks you up at Anchorage. So you have no choice but to finish the hike once you start because you can't stop mid-way and get off the trail, right?
Not silly at all. I didn't know how all this works until we got into it. This is correct, as I understand it. There is no place to get off the track. And at least for the shuttle service we used, it seems that the boats make their stops based on where passengers have reservations. So, if nobody has a reservation to be dropped off or picked up at Anchorage, then the boat may not stop there. This was also the case with the shuttle we used in the Marlborough Sounds later in our trip.

Several possible options:
You could just take a boat to one particular stop, such as Anchorage, and do some walking around there and then return to that location for the return (so as not to be caught in no man's land if weather changes). Several of the stops have some form of shelter. I know Awaroa has a lodge and cafe. I expect a lot of people do trips like this in warmer weather and just spend their time on the beach rather than walking.

Another option is to drive to Marahau, park and then walk the first portion of the track. That way, you're not dependent on any boat service. We did a very small portion of this but were short on time. It is very pretty. I'll post some photos when I get to those.

Originally Posted by KarenWoo
I went on to Wilson's website and see that they offer 3.5 hour cruises that cruise the length of the coast from Kaiteriteri to Totaranui and return. This is something we would love to do. Do you think a winter coat would be necessary while out on the water if it's windy and chilly? Looks like there's indoor seating as well as outside seating, right? I prefer not to bring a winter jacket. We both have fleeces and waterproof windbreakers. I envision us taking a lot of boating trips while in NZ. We are not interested in kayaking.
I doubt a winter jacket is required in November, unless you are there on a bad day. We rode up top to Awaroa, which is almost as far as Totaranui. I put my raincoat on as a windbreaker, but I don't recall it being uncomfortable (other than some wind). There are also inside seats.
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Old Nov 6th, 2023, 07:01 PM
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Abel Tasman Coast Track – Awaroa to Medlands Beach, about 9 km, 3.5 hours
We saved the best weather day for this hike. This is a bit farther north on the Abel Tasman track, and a very different hiking experience with several significant ascents and then descents down to beaches along the way. There was one brief moment of confusion, where a boardwalk led us directly into the ocean. We got our workout, but the scenery was well worth it.

It is a 1:30 boat ride to Awaroa, so you also get the benefit of seeing sights along the coast, such as Split Apple Rock (again) and an island with seals sunning on the rocks. The 25 or so people on our boat (well under its capacity) dispersed quickly at Awaroa. We passed only four people in the first 2.5 hours of our hike.



From the boat ride out to Awaroa: If you look closely, there's a baby seal sunning on the middle rock (iPhone photo).


Tonga Quarry


We got off the boat at Awaroa. The 25 or so people on the boat dispersed quickly, and we soon saw almost no one for over 2 hours.


Awaroa Beach


A bench with a view, somewhere after the first (or second) climb.


The trail has some nice boardwalks in places.


More boardwalks.


This caused a momentary bit of concern until we figured we needed to turn right and walk up the beach.


More weka.


Beach at Tonga Quarry.


The first and only swing bridge on this segment of the track.


Back at sea level.


Interesting bridge foundation.


These visitors are a long way from home.

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Old Nov 6th, 2023, 07:40 PM
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Marahau – the south end of the Abel Tasman Track

This town is about a 10-minute drive north of Kaiteriteri. I don't know the details, but there is apparently water taxi service from here, as well. Given the season, it seemed pretty quiet, with some of the recreational vendors still closed. Just beyond the town, we happened upon parking for the southern end of the Abel Tasman track. We had limited time, but enough for a brief 1 km or so walk out and back. This is a flat and pretty walk – and maybe a good option if you want a taste of the track without having to deal with water taxi schedules. Hard to tell from the photos, but it was hold-on-to-your-hat windy that day!


Southern entrance to the Abel Tasman Track






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Old Nov 7th, 2023, 07:28 AM
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Canada Geese!! They are introduced but now established there.

KarenWoo, wind and rain are always possible. You should always carry a GOOD packable rainjacket anytime you leave your vehicle in the countryside. A number of times we left when it was sunny and a few hours later were caught out in heavy rain. A collapsible little umbrella works but not if it's windy which it often is. A fleece layer that you can tie around your waist is a good layer to keep on hand especially when in the mountains or south end of South Island. (A vest would be okay except you can't tie it around your waist).

Get familiar with the MetService website (metservice.com) for forecasts as you may not always catch the broadcasts.
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Old Nov 7th, 2023, 07:31 AM
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Originally Posted by ms_go
Not silly at all. I didn't know how all this works until we got into it. This is correct, as I understand it. There is no place to get off the track. And at least for the shuttle service we used, it seems that the boats make their stops based on where passengers have reservations. So, if nobody has a reservation to be dropped off or picked up at Anchorage, then the boat may not stop there. This was also the case with the shuttle we used in the Marlborough Sounds later in our trip.

Several possible options:
You could just take a boat to one particular stop, such as Anchorage, and do some walking around there and then return to that location for the return (so as not to be caught in no man's land if weather changes). Several of the stops have some form of shelter. I know Awaroa has a lodge and cafe. I expect a lot of people do trips like this in warmer weather and just spend their time on the beach rather than walking.

Another option is to drive to Marahau, park and then walk the first portion of the track. That way, you're not dependent on any boat service. We did a very small portion of this but were short on time. It is very pretty. I'll post some photos when I get to those.



I doubt a winter jacket is required in November, unless you are there on a bad day. We rode up top to Awaroa, which is almost as far as Totaranui. I put my raincoat on as a windbreaker, but I don't recall it being uncomfortable (other than some wind). There are also inside seats.
Thank you so much for all of this detailed and very helpful information! You are right that we don't want to get caught in no-mans land in nasty weather! When I was reading about Abel Tasman NP in my guidebook it was difficult to get an accurate sense of how things work on the trails. Your logistical information is very helpful in planning our trip. It's reassuring to know that some of the places have shelters and the lodge and cafe at Awaroa.
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Old Nov 7th, 2023, 07:38 AM
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Originally Posted by mlgb
Canada Geese!! They are introduced but now established there.

KarenWoo, wind and rain are always possible. You should always carry a GOOD packable rainjacket anytime you leave your vehicle in the countryside. A number of times we left when it was sunny and a few hours later were caught out in heavy rain. A collapsible little umbrella works but not if it's windy which it often is. A fleece layer that you can tie around your waist is a good layer to keep on hand especially when in the mountains or south end of South Island. (A vest would be okay except you can't tie it around your waist).

Get familiar with the MetService website (metservice.com) for forecasts as you may not always catch the broadcasts.
mlgb, thanks for the tip about the Met Service website! Will add that to my sightseeing notes. I have a very good Marmot waterproof windbreaker with a hood, and a very warm Kuhl fleece jacket with a hood. They served me well in Glacier National Park. I brought both of them with me to Scotland last June but very luckily I hardly needed them because we were fortunate to have awesome weather. I will make sure my husband is properly outfitted.
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Old Nov 7th, 2023, 07:40 AM
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ms_go, all of your photos are beautiful. The photos of the trails are very helpful. Nelson looks like a very pretty and very pleasant small city.
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Old Nov 7th, 2023, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by mlgb
Get familiar with the MetService website (metservice.com) for forecasts as you may not always catch the broadcasts.
Agreed! This was our weather app of choice, with the iPhone weather app for secondary reference.

That one rainy day
It was spring, so there was bound to rain here and there. We got that on the middle day of our stay in Kaiteriteri. It actually wasn’t raining in the morning, but the forecast was too ominous to consider hiking. So, we set out by car around to the north of Abel Tasman National Park. It’s a very scenic drive that winds up and then down via a series of switchbacks, and then through a valley back to the coast at Golden Bay. We had a list of possible stops between Takaka and Wainui Bay, but we skipped most of them due to rain and/or high wind.


The drive started out with sun - and a rainbow - and the scenery got better and better as we climbed.


Our first stop was Paine's Ford, a popular spot for swimming, hiking and rock climbing. It was peaceful and quiet, with no one else there. We enjoyed the walk out for 10-15 minutes, until the rain turned from mist to an annoyance.


By the time we got to Golden Bay, we could barely open the car doors to get a look at the coast.


Even the penguins were probably hiding from the wind.

In the charming town of Takaka, we enjoyed an excellent lunch at Dada Manifesto. The sun was coming out as we entered the restaurant, so we thought we might like to walk around town – which has a number of galleries and small shops – after lunch. Nope. Raining again, so we started back to our home base, only to have the sun begin to come out along the way. Wait five minutes, they say…


Dada Manifesto in Takaka was a great lunch stop.


Scallops were welcome on a cold, blustery afternoon.


On the drive back to Kaiteriteri.


Now the sun's out again.



One place to escape wind and rain is in a cave. The limestone Ngarua Caves are along the highway between Motueka and Upper Takaka. On a whim, we stopped and joined the 2 pm tour – just us and one other couple from Australia. Estimated to be about 1.5 million years old, the caves have many interesting formations. The tour lasts close to an hour.





I should add that we (and by “we” I mean mr_go) drove in Ireland just a few months prior to this. We found the driving in New Zealand to be generally easier. The roads a little wider for the most part, with less traffic – although still plenty of big trucks!

Accommodation: Kaiteriteri Reserve Apartments
The “Reserve” is a big facility with accommodations that range from caravan hook-ups to cabins to camp sites. There is also a building with seven very nice and fairly new apartments. We splurged on one with a direct ocean view. It is very nicely furnished, with a full, modern kitchen and washer/dryer (one reason we could get by with only carry-on luggage). Although it was too cold to keep the windows open at night, we could still hear the surf.



This town is reportedly very, very busy in peak season. While there were a number of caravans and cars in the camp ground, crowds were pretty sparse.

With it being low season, there was just one restaurant (The Beached Whale) open in the evening in the immediate vicinity – and a 15/20-minute drive to go elsewhere. We cooked in two of four nights. There is a convenience store directly below our apartment that was good for some basics – and also well-known for its ice cream—although we went to Countdown in Motueka to stock up on groceries for our first week.
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Old Nov 8th, 2023, 07:13 AM
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Marlborough
After four nights, we traded our sea view in Kaiteriteri for a lovely cottage in the middle of vineyards near Blenheim.

Marlborough, at the northeast end of New Zealand's South Island, also offers abundant and varied recreation. It is home to one of the country’s biggest and best-known wine regions, a series of very scenic sounds, and the Queen Charlotte Track – among other things.

We looked at various options for where to stay – including Picton and Havelock at the mouth of the sounds, more remote lodges out in the sounds, and things in the Blenheim/Renwick wine areas. I’m sure we would have been happy with any of those choices, but the cottages at Walnut Block vineyards really appealed to us.

There are two identical cottages, each just steps away from the vines and with a full wall of windows and a patio to enjoy the views – something that will be one of our top memories from this trip. Our cottage was very nicely furnished, with a lot of little touches from fully stocked breakfast fixings to heated bathroom floors. We also had a few visits from the proprietors’ friendly dog. This was about as idyllic and relaxing as it gets.

It was hard to tear ourselves away from the cottage, but we did spend a couple of days out and about, enjoying the sunny spring weather.








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Old Nov 8th, 2023, 10:36 AM
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Looks like a great place to stay.
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