Thailand: Vaccinations

Old May 13th, 2006, 08:21 PM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 12
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thailand: Vaccinations

Any recommendations on vaccinations for Thailand. (Bangkok / Phuket / Phi Phi)
powerplay1 is offline  
Old May 13th, 2006, 08:51 PM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 5,034
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Checking the CDC site before consulting with your doctor would probably be helpful for you. http://www.cdc.gov/travel/seasia.htm

I think you and your doctor should decide what is best for you based on your personal medical history.
KimJapan is offline  
Old May 14th, 2006, 07:30 AM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 33,209
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Kim is absolutely right, you do want to discuss this with a doctor. Do try to find a tropical medicine or travel medicine specialist, as most genreal practitioners have little to no knowledge in this area. I recommend printing out the cdc info to take with you so you can have an informed discussion with your doctor.

Here's a brief rundown of thisng to consider:

You'll want to make sure your routine vaccines are up to date (tetanus/diptheria, MMR, polio).

Then there are what are generally referred to as "travelers vaccines" like Hep A (though you'd be wise to have it even if you stay home). You may want to consider Hep B as well. Typhoid is recommended for travel to tropical climes (including, of course, Thailand).

Then there are more specialized vaccines like Japanese Encephalatis and rabies that are only recommended for travelers in specific situations (which doesn't sound like you, but do read the sections in the cdc site).

The other issue to consider to tropical places is malaria, but none of the areas you mention are malarial risk.
Kathie is offline  
Old May 23rd, 2006, 12:41 PM
  #4  
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 158
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Briton dies of severe malaria, despite taking anti-malarial drugs Full story:
http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=70090
hi50phd is offline  
Old May 23rd, 2006, 12:57 PM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 33,209
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Unfortunately, this article does not give info on exactly which anti-malarial he was taking, although it does say that it was one known not to be effective against a strain of malaria in the Burmese border area. We do know that there is larium-resistant malaria in that area. Also, given that he was a Brit, there is an over-the counter anti-malairl sold in Britian which is not effective against malaria in much of SE Asia. While there are two anti-malarials that are effective world-wide (malarone and doxycycline) no medication or vaccination is 100% effective, and anyone becoming ill with a fever and flu-like symptoms in a malarial risk area should be tested immediately. Cerebral malaria can kill within a number of hours.
Kathie is offline  
Old May 23rd, 2006, 12:58 PM
  #6  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 6,894
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
It is a sad story. However there are no details whatsoever about what anti-malarial drugs he was taking or what strains of malaria he contracted.
Craig is offline  
Old May 23rd, 2006, 02:12 PM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 888
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
This is a very sad story, he was very young.

The BBC article on this reports that he obtained his medication from a doctor not over the counter.

I didn't even know you could get your anti-malarial medication over the counter here! There's not much that you can. Is it some kind of alternative remedy?
Bella_Bluebell is offline  
Old May 23rd, 2006, 02:34 PM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 33,209
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Bella, in the UK, you can get a proguanil plus chlorquine anti-malarial over the counter. It is not used by physicians in the US or Canada. It is not considred effective anywhere there is chlorquine resistance (most of Africa and Asia) but often gets recommended to travelers nontheless, perhaps because it is available over the counter, and many travelers do not consult a travel med specialist. There have been a number of cases of travelers contracting malaria when on this medication but traveling in areas with chlorquine-resistant malaria.
Kathie is offline  
Old May 23rd, 2006, 02:35 PM
  #9  
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 100
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Speaking of vaccinations. I am going to Taiwan and Singapore next month for work for about a total of ten days, any thing that I should be concerned about or any vaccinations I should get
dba31498 is offline  
Old May 24th, 2006, 02:09 AM
  #10  
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 888
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Hi Kathie - I didn't know that. Wow - those medications are so 'outdated' I suppose now to my mind, that is really quite appalling. I have just found an article about one of our MPs lobbying for the licence to do this to be withdrawn.
Bella_Bluebell is offline  
Old May 24th, 2006, 07:14 AM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 759
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
If you're in the UK many GP's are now (quite surpisingly given the recent cash crisis in the NHS) offering Jabs free of charge and Malarial drugs on NHS prescription.

I recentally had Typhoid, Polio, Tetanus and Hep A boosters (2 jabs in total) and 6 weeks supply of Doxycycline for just under £7

The jabs were done by the nurse within 20 mins, whilst the prescription was being made up.

A very short, virtually pain free procedure.

It's just not worth chancing it. These diseases are not to too be messed about with and even in South East Asia, Malaria regularly kills.

I read a fact a few years back - Other than natural causes, the Mosquito is responsible for killing more people in history than anything else!
Walter_Walltotti is offline  
Old May 24th, 2006, 07:21 AM
  #12  
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 888
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Hi Walter - we went for jabs yesterday!

The nurse yesterday (in UK) was explaining to me that as a matter of UK health policy typhoid and Hep A are now given free - the shots are cheap compared to the costs of treating people who go abroad and come back needing expensive typhoid or Hep A treatment.

If you get the combined Hep A and Hep B shot, you get the Hep B free effectively as well. If you get Hep B separately, you have to pay. Rabies you have to pay for as well - £129 through NHS.
Bella_Bluebell is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Original Poster
Forum
Replies
Last Post
zoso
Asia
8
Oct 3rd, 2014 07:20 AM
daria26
Asia
10
Jul 21st, 2011 06:07 PM
ksblank
Asia
37
Jul 1st, 2007 06:12 PM
jrk219
Asia
5
Mar 11th, 2007 11:24 AM
dwchicago
Asia
7
Apr 27th, 2006 05:55 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Do Not Sell My Personal Information