Go Back  Fodor's Forum > Destinations > Asia
Reload this Page > One week in Taiwan (is not enough!)
Notices

One week in Taiwan (is not enough!)

Reply

Jul 1st, 2017, 11:05 PM
  #1
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 6,542
One week in Taiwan (is not enough!)

We love Taiwan!

It had been on our travel radar for a number of years, but somehow had never got around to it. A shame because we have been missing a lot!


Perhaps part of the reason for not coming before, was that even the basic planning proved difficult. Unlike SE Asia and say Japan, information seemed a little thin on the ground. It quickly became apparent that the Rough Guides, Lonely Planet etc. guidebooks were of limited value. A lot of our initial information I gleaned from surfing a few blogs on the country.

The single most useful resource I found was http://www.discovertaiwanadventures.com It was set up very recently by an American couple living in Taiwan who are keen to promote Taiwan to western tourists whom, perhaps, like us, because of the language barriers, were reticent about coming. One of the owners, Crystine has been immensely helpful in helping me in planning our time in the country answering all of my many questions, and providing lots of suggestions as to how to make best use of our limited time on this trip.

The website is full of information ( and some great photos). The tours offered are reasonably priced and I have no doubt will be of a very high quality. We travel independently, more or less permanently, and rarely engage agents or operators but this one really is a breath of fresh air, their primary aim being to ensure people have good time in their adopted country rather than just selling yours. Even though we travel independently most of the time, I do feel that Taiwan is the sort of place where engaging with an operator at the planning stage and for tours for some parts will really add value which is exact what we will do when we make a return visit.


TRANSPORT & COMMS

On arrival bought an Ecard on arrival for 500 New Taiwan dollars which enables us to use the MRT, buses etc. in Taipei. Taiwan is one of the most connected cities in the world with free public wifi just about everywhere but I also bought a 4G SIM with unlimited data and $150 of calls, valid for 7 days for $500 (£12).

OUTLINE ITINERARY

We flew AirAsia to Tayouan airport, now my favourite airport in the world! Spacious, extremely well designed, it was a pleasure to use!

This was a very short trip of seven days. The idea being that if we liked it, we may return for a longer visit. My initial thought was to split our time between Taipei and Tainan but Thursdaysd had suggested Taroko Gorge was definitely worth a look a view endorsed by Crystine. So we decided to split our time 3 days in Hualien for the gorge and The East Coast Scenic Area and the remainder would be spent in and around Taipei.

TRANSPORT

On arrival at the airport, armed with our aforementioned eCards we got the excellent MRT into Taipei Main Station in the centre of the city (35mins).

I had booked our train tickets online a couple of weeks in advance ( very necessary) and picked them up at the booth in Taipei Main Station. It is massive and the travel hub pretty much for the entire country. It would become our hub for travel when we returned to the city in a few days as we were staying close by.

Our train to Hualien left exactly on time, very comfortable and took around 2.5 hours.

We decided that to maximise our limited time in Hualien and around, we would rent a car. We chose Avis, as I am a Privilege Member and got a good deal. Driving is easy, roads are quiet, driving standards high. We navigated using Googlemaps on an iPhone ( with the 4G SIM) - Easy peasy, if a little strange after the mayhem of Vietnam.

We absolutely love this country and do regret not planning to stay longer. The people are wonderfully friendly and so welcoming. More so than I ever expected. Taiwan, even with the language barriers, is certainly one of the friendliest countries we have ever visited, even with the. Everyone we have met has been incredibly helpful to us. The Taiwanese people really are the most welcoming people!

There are so many incredible sights to see , stunning scenery, incredible temples and the food is sublime. Transport is cheap and incredibly efficient and it really doesn't take that long to master the intricacies of the MRT, train and bus systems.

I will follow this up with a brief trip report and more detail and photos on our blog.
crellston is online now  
Reply With Quote
Jul 2nd, 2017, 12:17 AM
  #2
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 241
Sounds great. I am looking forward to hearing more.
loncall is online now  
Reply With Quote
Jul 2nd, 2017, 03:04 AM
  #3
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,914
Another traveler who's discovered the beauty of Taiwan! I'm looking to hearing more, especially your time in Taipei. I too was there for about a week back in 2012 as part of a longer Asia trip but did not made it out of the capital metro area.
tripplanner001 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 2nd, 2017, 08:52 AM
  #4
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 31,778
I, too, have had just a week in Taipei. I'd love to return and see more of the country.
Kathie is online now  
Reply With Quote
Jul 2nd, 2017, 02:59 PM
  #5
kja
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,134
Thank for your report, crellston! I’m considering Taiwan for my next trip, so I know I’ll be returning to this very helpful message and your blog in the next few months.
kja is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 2nd, 2017, 07:37 PM
  #6
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 800
Thank you for the intriguing post. I have also been considering Taiwan for my 2018 trip, and your insight may have tipped the scales. I have some questions:

1. If one does not rent a car in Hualien, what are the alternative transportation modes? I drove solo in Japan, and I don't want to do it again.

2. How are the prices?

3. What exactly did the travel company do for you, that you could not do on your own?

4. How is the culture different in Taiwan than PRC?

5. If you had more time in Taiwan, where would you go?
CaliforniaLady is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 2nd, 2017, 07:47 PM
  #7
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 22,504
So glad you enjoyed Taiwan. Real shame you had to cut Tainan but sounds like you will be back.

CaliforniaLady - i did Taroko Gorge two ways, one day with a car and driver arranged through my hotel, and one day with the public bus. My feeling about Taiwan, especially the temples, was that it was "authentic" in that it was still attached to its history in a way mainland China was not because of the Cultural Revolution. Unlike crellston I found Lonely Planet adequate except for non-street food.
thursdaysd is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 6th, 2017, 01:57 AM
  #8
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 864
Am eagerly awaiting your trip report. I am arriving in Taiwan in October before my trip to Japan. Had originally planned one week, but may consider more time on my return.
Am using miles to fly first class on EVA only availability was Taiwan and since flights to Japan are so inexpensive that's what I decided. Also it's nonstop from New York
Nywoman is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 6th, 2017, 02:08 AM
  #9
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 250
We have had Taiwan on our list for a while.. Good to hear you confirm it! My wife and I know the Taipei airport like the backs of our hands as we usually connect through there as we fly EVA to Asia most times since they have some of the best prices out of NY. For instance, our current trip to Vietnam cost about $1000 round trip all in oer person.
khtodd is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 6th, 2017, 02:48 AM
  #10
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 6,542
Before start on a TR I will try and address a few of the comments and questions firstly CaliLady:

Hualien - alternative transportation modes? Self driving is easy, esp with google maps. Road manners are excellent, signage good.

- A scheduled shuttle public bus also departs from near the station (but allegedly are a little unreliable.
- There are also scooter hire places at the station - no chance!
- Taxis seemed the preferred option for many. Cost, around 2-3k NTD for a half / full day
- Tours are also available - the site I mentioned above I think charge around $100 pp

2. How are the prices? Not as expensive as I imagined. Food is on a par with say Thailand, very reasonable an v. Good. Taxis are cheap (and always use the meter). Rail travel again, is exceptionally good value. Accomodation, I would say, 40-50% cheaper than equivalent, mid range places in SEA.



3. What exactly did the travel company do for you, that you could not do on your own?
- didn't actually take any tours with discovertaiwan. The owner, Crystine is genuinely keen to promote tourism to western traveller. She was exceptionally, helpful in helping me plan our trip, which I was find quite difficult, given the paucity of information available. She made suggestions, both for areas to concentrate on for our merge 7 days and places to focus on within those areas. The guidebook I had was both out of date and lacked any in depth info.

4. How is the culture different in Taiwan than PRC?

- never having been to PRC, I can only comment on my experiences and interaction with mainland Chinese people mostly at home and when travelling (both in business and as a tourist). Without being disparaging to the entire PRC nation, let's just say that I found the Taiwanese, despite the language barriers, exceptionally friendly, helpful and welcoming. As friendly a people as any we have found on our travels.

5. If you had more time in Taiwan, where would you go?
- haven't really put much thought to that except that we didn't see all we wanted to see in Taipei. The west coast and the interior has some amazing scenery and maybe cross island hike. Train down to the south - Keelung, Tainan, sun and moon lake, Alishan NP, Kenting NP.

Apologies, I am suffering from a bad case of Borneo Belly today! Back soon!
crellston is online now  
Reply With Quote
Jul 6th, 2017, 03:12 AM
  #11
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 6,542
Perhaps TMI?

Thursdaysd - it was a hard decision between, Tainan and Hualien. The latter just seemed to fit transport wise and we were likely to be seeing a lot of temples etc. elsewhere on this trip. Tainan is a definite for our next visit. I used RoughGuides rather than LP. Possibly my last time ever to buy a guidebook!

Khtodd - a very long time since we have flown Eva, but I have fond memories. We will likely use them via Taipei when we next visit our Aus family in Sydney.

I think it was you that mentioned you were looking forward to the heat in Hoi An - if so, visit Taiwan in July - it is savage!!

Nywoman and Kathie. We had just the week too. Taipei could have easily taken up all that time. Last week we found the heat and humidity really draining with temps in the high 30s Celsius. We found ourselves flagging by early/ mis afternoon. Always a welcome relief to get back into the MRT for some AC!

We may well return in October (when the weather is more temperate) on our way back to England. Apparently, the weather is much more manageable then, at least for us sensitive brits who are not used to it! Although the weather in England at the moment is apparently very similar - what is going on??
crellston is online now  
Reply With Quote
Jul 6th, 2017, 05:02 AM
  #12
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 250
Yes, we find EVA to be very pleasant. On this last trip, my wife and were both able to sleep for about 7-8 hours, in coach no less.

Yes, I said was looking forward to the heat, and I certainly got my wish. It was about 100F with a heat index of about 120F for the entire time we've been here until yesterday when there was a huge thunderstorm and the heat broke. Today was just in the mid 80sF.

But, I find if you're dressed appropriately, and stay indoors or relax by the pool during the hottest time if day, it's quite bearable and dare I say pleasant. I don't think my muscles have ever been so relaxed without a massage.
khtodd is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 6th, 2017, 05:11 AM
  #13
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 250
Also, we've gad similar weather this time of year in HK also, so your experience in Taiwan is not surprising. When I look at photos of us walking around HK this time of year about 6 years ago, it looks like we jumped in a pond with our clothes on.

To me, my biggest fear in going to Taiwan this time of year is typhoons. When we went to HK, we just missed one by 1 day. A trip to BKK a few years ago (connecting through TPE) a typhoon hit the day we were leaving and not knowing if they were going to cancel the flights, we changed our tix to Sing Air and went through Singapore, adding about 6 hours to our trip. Then, 2 years ago we were returning home from Sing via TPE and a typhoon hit as we took off for our connection home... So our averages have not been good!!!!! I'm glad you had no problems this year.
khtodd is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 6th, 2017, 07:41 AM
  #14
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 9,083
EVA air is highly rated per skytrax, # 1 this yr. I think.

We want to go to China and a few other places but what about getting to Taiwan from China. Are there travel restrictions due to the political differences? I was thinking of doing RT air ORD-PEK and exploring around from there say to KL to see friends but if we go to Taiwan can we re enter China to return home with a Taiwan stamp in our passport?
jacketwatch is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 6th, 2017, 08:15 AM
  #15
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 8,067
Following along with interest, have been considering Taiwan for my next trip to Asia. I, too, have found information a bit thin online and appreciate the website resource.
MmePerdu is online now  
Reply With Quote
Jul 6th, 2017, 09:13 PM
  #16
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 800
crellston - Thank you so much for taking the time to answer my questions. I take it that the Taiwanese do not spit in the street, as do their mainland neighbors. Sorry, I couldn't resist. In any case, you now have an entourage that want to visit Taiwan. Hope you're feeling better.

thursdays - That was an interesting point about why the culture is different in Taiwan than PRC. I often wondered why the Taiwanese that I have met seemed to be critical thinkers, and now I know why.
CaliforniaLady is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 7th, 2017, 08:35 PM
  #17
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 6,542
No they don't spit in the street! Quite the opposite. There are signs everywhere on the MRT, hotels, shopping malls reminding people how to behave. Don't talk loudly, don't have your personal stereo to loud, give up your seat to someone less able etc.etc. There seems to be something inbuilt into the national psyche to distance themselves from the people on the mainland.

It is very easy to spot the mainland Chinese, of which we only came across a few, by their behaviour! I read somewhere that tourism from the mainland has been decreasing of late, probably at the behest of Beijing.

As an aside, for background for anyone visiting either China , I would recommend reading the Anthony Grey novel, "Peking" based very much in fact is is an account of one mans journey through China from the 1920s to the 1970s. Anthony, a Reuters bureau chief Peking also wrote an autobiographical account of his two years under house arrest in Peking.
crellston is online now  
Reply With Quote
Jul 7th, 2017, 08:58 PM
  #18
kja
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,134
I just ordered Grey’s book – thanks!
kja is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 8th, 2017, 04:00 PM
  #19
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 4,146
Hope your Borneo Belly is resolving, Crellston!!
In which area of Taipei did you stay? Would yu recommend the hotel for either of your destinations?
A friend recommended the Daan Park Dandy (how's that for alliteration!?) Taipei hotel, nice neighborhood, close to Metro. Thoughts?
I've been interested in Taiwan for several yrs. It's a long but nonstop flight on EVA Air (which was excellent for getting to VN) San Francisco and Taipei.
(For you fellow Californians with One World Miles, Cathay Pacific flies the route as well, with one brief stop in Kong Kong.)
CaliNurse is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 8th, 2017, 04:43 PM
  #20
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 9,083
Your description of how Taiwanese behave reminds me of Singaporeans as well as their feelings towards mainland Chinese!

I used your link to ask my question about passport and visa issues and got a prompt reply. No problem with a US passport so that is helpful to know.

Following!
jacketwatch is offline  
Reply With Quote
 



Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 10:37 AM.