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Take off your money belt at security. Really!?

Take off your money belt at security. Really!?

Dec 7th, 2012, 12:57 PM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 63,563
"And what about getting from the airport to your hotel? I frequently use public transport for that leg, you'd better believe I'm wearing my money belt!

Then rearrange your valuables and don your money belt in the restroom at your arrival airport. easy peasy.

It would never occur to me to wear a money belt through security and on a plane. Of course one would have to remove it for screening - which totally defeats the purpose of having a 'body safe' that no one should know is there.
janisj is online now  
Dec 7th, 2012, 02:24 PM
  #22  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
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One did not have to remove it before nude scans. One does not have to remove it many other countries.

I put it on after security and reload it after hitting the ATM on arrival. In the restroom
thursdaysd is offline  
Dec 7th, 2012, 04:13 PM
  #23  
 
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I lock my money belt in my carry-on bag to get through security and then put it on in the restroom. And of course I wear it on the plane--it wouldn't occur to me not to. Especially when I travel alone, I'm not going to leave my valuables at my seat while using the restroom nor am I going to lug a handbag/tote to the restroom. But then I also keep my carry-on bags locked on a plane.

I can imagine the conversation with the police: "Gee, officer, I put everything in a money belt to protect myself from theft, but I wasn't actually wearing it."
HRHDHD is offline  
Dec 7th, 2012, 07:15 PM
  #24  
 
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I like the idea of locking the bag before I send it thru security. Gwanna steal that one!
LEANNA is offline  
Dec 7th, 2012, 07:16 PM
  #25  
 
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Whoops!!! Forgot....THANK YOU!!!
LEANNA is offline  
Dec 8th, 2012, 12:55 AM
  #26  
 
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I second travelgourmet's view.

If you compare the sheer number of people going through check points every day in the US (I think the LA Times said it was 2 MILLION) these incidents are not more than anectodal failures IMO.
Comparing TSA to other security staff in Europe, I cannot find any remarkable differences which go beyond anectodal experiences of especially nice or cranky security personnel on either side of the Atlantic.

At least it gets outweighed by the huge number of delays cause by totally ignorant passengers who were mentally able not to notice 10 information posters and videos and audio announcements on their way to the security checkpoint to put their liquids in the bag.

Or that fully braindead couple who misinterpreted the announcement to put "everything" thru the x-ray machine at Dublin airport. And lifted the baby seat - with the baby sitting in it! - on the conveyer belt to let it run thru the x-ray machine! Luckily a security staff stopped the belt..
Cowboy1968 is offline  
Dec 8th, 2012, 08:18 AM
  #27  
 
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"Right to what? To hold up other passengers with your paranoid behavior?"
I don't cnsider myself paranoid but when you are treated in such a manner you do have the right to have another authority there. I showed them it was a money belt, It was when they tried to jack me around by calling this and that person to check that it was a money belt with money in it, that I decided to stand my ground.
An no I did not hold up other passengers, as I had steped to the side.
Anyone who travels at all knows that theft is rampant these days and while most are honest its your responsibility to look out for your self and things.
JoanneH is offline  
Dec 8th, 2012, 10:02 AM
  #28  
 
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Anyone who travels at all knows that theft is rampant these days and while most are honest its your responsibility to look out for your self and things.

I'll go out on a limb and say that I almost certainly travel more than you and I don't think theft is rampant, especially by TSA personnel during the security screening process.
travelgourmet is offline  
Dec 8th, 2012, 01:31 PM
  #29  
 
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There is certainly theft by TSA employees. Follow the links above, or try this one: http://tsanewsblog.com/7963/news/dej...%28TSA+News%29

Whether it is "rampant" depends on your definition, and your standard of comparison. In any case, if you are a victim, it hardly matters to you whether or not it is rampant. Since it occurs, it is only prudent to take precautions. My current carry-on isn't lockable, but it is due for retirement and I will look for a replacement that can be locked.
thursdaysd is offline  
Dec 8th, 2012, 02:25 PM
  #30  
 
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I jam my wallet into my shoe. My change and keys go into the other shoe. If the TSA goon touches either of my shoes before I say they can, they will get my sock stuck where the sun don't shine.
Just another reason I travel on Amtrak more than flying.
tomfuller is online now  
Dec 9th, 2012, 07:54 AM
  #31  
 
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Nicely stated, thursdaysd.

I just want to make my stuff less easy to steal. I hope a thief will move on to the next bag when he or she can't get into mine.
HRHDHD is offline  
Dec 9th, 2012, 10:12 AM
  #32  
 
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Well I "benefited" from TSA generosity in a sense. By the time we arrived in Papeete from Chicago I noticedthat the TSAlock on one of our suitcases was missing and thought "oh boy" whats missing. When we got to the ship I found the lock inside the suitcase, all mangled AND chargers for Nokia, Sony and Minolta devices. Trouble was they weren't mine. All I can speculate about is that the TSA mistakenly put that stuff in my bag.
jacketwatch is online now  
Dec 10th, 2012, 11:48 PM
  #33  
 
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Thursday. I beg to differ that there is a difference in money belt to handbag when talking about the security of my money and it going through a scanner temporarily out of sight. I was trying to be diplomatic when describing my handbag. To me, my $5000+ cash in my handbag is the same as all ones valuables in a money belt.
MissGreen is offline  
Dec 12th, 2012, 04:26 AM
  #34  
 
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MissGreen - you mentioned "a bit" of cash. $5000 is not "a bit" to most people.
thursdaysd is offline  
Dec 12th, 2012, 04:37 AM
  #35  
 
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Also, just flew back to the US from Santiago. They had sepearate security lines for people headed to the US. Had to take footwear off, but standard metal detectors, so I was able to go through wearing my money belt. But as we were boarding the plane there was a separate check of hand luggage for liquids, and everything aside from the famous quart bag was confiscated. I was not allowed to take my bottle of water on board. I fly out of Fort Lauderdale tomorrow, guess I'll have to take my belt off for that flight.
thursdaysd is offline  
Dec 12th, 2012, 07:41 AM
  #36  
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Taking off my money belt in a landside restroom and putting it in my handbag (one that can be locked - great idea) to go through security ... then putting it back on as soon as I'm airside is my new plan. The LAX full body scanner was the only security scan that required my money belt to be removed. Seeing they're only at sporadic US airports (having been removed from most everywhere else in the world), is apparently why I just ran into this for the first time.
just27 is offline  
Dec 12th, 2012, 08:58 AM
  #37  
 
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I'm still trying to wrap my head around who it is that carries large amounts of cash in the US. Unless you are evading taxes or have such lousy credit you can't even get a debit card, carrying cash is just so anachronistic.
travelgourmet is offline  
Dec 12th, 2012, 09:29 AM
  #38  
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I can't imagine carrying $5,000 in cash. I was returning to the US after travelling in Italy and the UK. I had about EUR 200 and GBP 200 (to seed future trips), plus a couple of hundred USD which I always have in my purse. The nude screening occurred after picking up my bag at LAX to cross the US border, then having to go through security again to catch a flight to SMF.

All of which is beside my point. I had a problem with a TSA worker taking my money belt far-far-away to be x-rayed separately. Could he not have had me simply unzip it to show currency and a couple of credit cards? (Although, DH thinks the way I use my credit cards is lethal.)
just27 is offline  
Dec 12th, 2012, 04:16 PM
  #39  
 
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"I'm still trying to wrap my head around who it is that carries large amounts of cash...Unless you are evading taxes or have such lousy credit you can't even get a debit card, carrying cash is just so anachronistic." ~ travelgourmet

And, "I almost certainly travel more than you...". If so, you must know there are places in the world where you have little choice but to carry cash. My daughter and I carried $5,000 cash between us when we traveled for three weeks in Iran several years ago, for hotels, food, car and driver, shopping, etc.

In Iran you must bring along hard currency (US dollars, British pounds or Euros most acceptable) - cash, and nice freshly minted bills only, no tears, markings, folds or wrinkles. There are banks and ATMs in larger cities in Iran but none of them accept foreign credit or debit cards.

And my husband and I carried a large amount when traveling in Zimbabwe the year before, where most transactions are still done on a cash basis instead of via credit or debit cards.

In Zimbabwe this is just now starting to change, more than five years after banking services stopped because the amount of zeroes in transactions overwhelmed the system's ability to cope. I have several "One Hundred Million Dollars" and "One Hundred Trillion Dollars" banknotes from that visit. USD$1 bought ZW$100,000,000 in 2007 and it went up steeply from there for another couple of years!

just27 - I applaud you for thinking these TSA-related issues through and having a plan.
julia1 is offline  
Dec 12th, 2012, 07:06 PM
  #40  
 
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If so, you must know there are places in the world where you have little choice but to carry cash.

And I know those places aren't in the US. Considering that this thread is ostensibly about US security procedures, that seems like an important distinction, no?
travelgourmet is offline  

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