Serious U.S. Security Question

Old Apr 5th, 2005, 04:30 PM
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Serious U.S. Security Question

I realize that Australian airports have a domestic airport and a international airport, but what about the U.S? When a flight goes from LA to Atlanta, and then another one goes from Rome to Atlanta, who's job is it to make sure that the domestic doors are opened during the LA flight and the domestic door is locked during the Rome flight when they arrive at the same gate?

And Rkkwan, shame, you think I only have bad things to say about Continental. Don't you feel bad. This is a good question. It's our nation's security!

(My Bet's on the flight attendant from Continental who overcharged me $5.00 for a cheap glass of wine on a International flight from London to Houston. They were free on BA.)
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Old Apr 5th, 2005, 04:47 PM
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In some airport, international and domestic flights come in at different gates. No sharing. For example, the Bradley terminal at LAX.

In other airports, some gates are dual-use. When a domestic flight arrive, passengers are allowed to walk in the main terminal area. When an international flight arrives, the doors to the main terminal are closed, while passengers can only go - usually down one level - to the INS/customs area.

All passengers arriving at a US on an international flight must go directly to immigration/customs. There's no opportunity otherwise. [Exception are most flights from Canada and some from the Carribbean, where passengers already clear customs/immigration before boarding the plane.]

I hope that's what you're asking. If not, then please clarify.
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Old Apr 5th, 2005, 05:20 PM
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Just using your example, the international flights into and out of Atlanta use a separate building from the domestic flights. There is no way out of the international concourse except to go through US immigration and customs screening.
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Old Apr 6th, 2005, 03:44 AM
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Your answer was close. At MIA, who is the person in charge of making sure the domestic terminal door is locked when the International flight arrives? What happens if they forget to lock it?
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Old Apr 6th, 2005, 05:23 AM
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wally - in answer to your last question - either, someone gets fired or the US has just let in more undesireables (read: possible terrorists) to roam free as they wish.

But as mentioned above, even with the few jetways that accept both domestic and international arrivals; in those cases the jetway is designed for domestics to deplane on one level, while those deplaning from an international flight are directed to Immigration/Customs.

Now, go have your drink, on yourself. I sure hope, you don't select an airline based on whether you have to pay $5 for a drink or not.
 
Old Apr 6th, 2005, 05:44 AM
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Thinking back, it seems that every time I've gotten off an international flight there was a person at the "junction" point to direct people towards the international arrivals route. That makes me think there may also be fire laws which prohibit locking the "domestic" door in case of emergency, and the person to ensure nobody sneaks through it.
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Old Apr 6th, 2005, 07:08 AM
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Why not worry about the porous borders between US and Canada or US and Mexico instead?
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Old Apr 6th, 2005, 07:16 AM
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Sandi, thanks for your response. I have flown out of Orlando MCO and Miami MIA and have noticed when I return that if one doesn't follow the person ahead of you, you could open the other door and walk into the domestic terminal instead of going to immigration. I didn't try opening the door but I'm sure a terrorist might try. I hope it is locked or at least someone is guarding the door. And how do we know that that someone guarding the door isn't helping a terrorist?

As for the drink, the U.S. airlines had better keep their prices $40 cheaper than BA and Virgin and the rest of the European gang or I will switch. When I fly to Europe, I usually board the plane with just my credit cards and no cash. I hit the ATM machine when I get there. I don't drink sodas, their evil! Red wine will put me to sleep.

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Old Apr 6th, 2005, 07:18 AM
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Wally - If you have serious security concern for the US, I suggest you inform the TSA supervisor at that airport, or perhaps contact your congressman. They will take you seriously, but we won't here.
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Old Apr 6th, 2005, 01:33 PM
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Is this a joke?

Wally - learn how to relax. Going through airport doors is the least of any terrorists worry. Billions of $ worth oif drugs get smuggled in every year to the US, what makes you think that getting few terrorists through our borders would be any different?

Love life, love travel and enjoy yourself. Don't worry too much about thinks that you can't control.
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Old Apr 6th, 2005, 03:02 PM
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AAFF -

You've got that right. Wally is too worried about things he shouldn't be worried about.

rkkwan - And you've got it right. Wally should be more concerned with our north and south borders, rather than jetway deplaning procedures.

Our government has everything buttbackwards. Passports for everyone crossing our borders - north/south - guess the Passport office has to raise funds. Didn't they just increase the price for "new" passports. Our entire northern border is open for any "uptonogooder" to cross, just as many to do on the southern border.

 
Old Apr 6th, 2005, 04:30 PM
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I don't want to change this thread into the one in the Europe board, and I have resisted posting there. But what's so wrong about requiring people to enter the US with a passport? Sorry, I just don't see what's the big deal is.

Last time I check, national security is one of the few things that the federal government was specifically setup to do. And since there's no national ID card, then requiring a passport to travel is really no big deal.

Yeah, spending more money to keep the border secure is fine by me, but I just don't see the hysteria of people resisting travel with a passport. Maybe because I have one since I was a baby...
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Old Apr 7th, 2005, 09:22 AM
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I think the best way to put your fears at ease would be to test it-go through the wrong way and see what happens or try to open that locked door...When they catch people going the wrong way, at least in ATL, the would shut the whole airport down...go for it
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