what size ll bean adventure duffle for safari

Sep 1st, 2016, 06:12 AM
  #1  
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what size ll bean adventure duffle for safari

thanks
plambers is offline  
Sep 1st, 2016, 07:25 AM
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The safari company will tell you how large a bag you can take . . .
janisj is online now  
Sep 1st, 2016, 08:25 AM
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Don't take too big of a one. They are hard to handle carrying and I found it frustrating to find things in a big bag, which is why I gave up on a duffle entirely! Lipault, Lipault!
amyb is offline  
Sep 1st, 2016, 11:46 PM
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I did check the ebag website and found a duffel bag "Skyway Westport" on sale.
georgetgonzales is offline  
Sep 2nd, 2016, 12:27 PM
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Welcome to Fodors georgetgonzales. The Skyway westport is a 30 inch duffle bag and MUCH too large for a safari. Probably wouldn't even be allowed .
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Sep 3rd, 2016, 07:01 PM
  #6  
TC
 
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Hi Plamers. We took the "large" LL Bean bags .....the ones without wheels. We had no problem in Botswana on small planes. They kinda smoosh into the cargo hold. I pack in large zip lock bags. That way it's easy to find things and to pack and unpack in camps. Just pull the bags out and put them on the shelves. I feel like it helps keep any little creepy crawlies out of my clothing, too.
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Sep 4th, 2016, 12:51 PM
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I did the same thing with the LL Bean..the "large" one, no wheels. They were not as strict as I imagined, as there were people on our tiny-plane flight that had wheeled hard-sided bags. You really need very, very little on these trips; check some threads here on packing for Bots and SA safaris.

BTW: Jeans and neutral t-shirts will be fine, no need to get into the whole khaki, safari mode. That is for first-timers, in my experience.

From my second report on travel to the area:



< I have recommended Southern Destinations to several friends here in New York and all were extremely pleased with Liesl, and with the agency.

Here is a bit more information, on packing, aimed mostly at first-time visitors to the region, or first-time safari-goers.


A word on packing, from a serial over-packer:

On my last, month-long, trip to southern Africa, the combination of bringing “too much stuff,” and the strict weight restrictions of the small planes that service the safari camps, combined to force me to check a suitcase in the storage area of OR Tambo airport in Johannesburg. Due to the inconvenience, and to the fairly shady, or at least mixed, reputation of this facility, I was determined to fit everything into my large L.L. Bean canvas duffel bag, plus small carry-on backpack and rather large handbag. (My partner also took one, smaller duffel, and one wheeled, Eagle Creek carry on bag; I did manage to sneak a few purchases into his bags as the trip progressed; I also again mailed home a(n) expensive package of purchases from PostNet in Cape Town)

I cannot remember exactly what I brought along, but I do remember that is was FAR TOO MUCH!! Having two pair of shoes, one pair of lace-ups and one pair sandals, plus a pair of flip flops/thongs, was perfect, although I know realize what veteran safari-goers already know: Sandals are not ideal footwear on game drives.

Where I went wrong was in bringing 4 pair of pants: Two pair of jeans, one black (intended for evenings in Cape Town but not absolutuely necessary, and one gray, which was heavily in rotation). One other pairi of pants, and one pair black leggings, never worn. Because mercifully, I had lost weight since my last trip, I left my zip-off “safari” pants (which have never, ever been zipped off) at home and brought a new pair of “safari” pants which rolled up to calf length. I also brought about 5 short sleeved t-shirts, one “nice” white shirt that I planned to wear at night on safari but which remained snug in my bag for the entire trip, and 2 long-sleeved black t-shirts (why two??) and a pair of shorts for lounging in the room. Too much, considering that both our camps included daily laundry service in their all-inclusive price.

I brought one “nice” cotton jacket, which I rarely wore. Brought one microfiber black, zippered jacket from L.L. Bean, which I wore a lot. My khaki Tilley hat, which tied snug under the chin, was also heavily used.


However, I did not take the advice so generously offered here to bring a wool scarf, gloves, and a warm hat for cold mornings and evenings. (see last part of planning thread, also linked above:


http://www.fodors.com/community/afri...-vs-phinda.cfm


Not only that, I did NOT have a heavy, or even medium-weight jacket.


And so I was very, very cold-- no--I was freezing, during the first part of the morning drives and the last part of the evening drives. (Vehicles did have blankets, and at Tswalu they supplied hot water bottles. Even so, it was cold in mid-October, in both the Sabi Sands and at Tswalu.

Lodge gift shops do sell some of the items that I had neglected to bring (I bought a fuzzy hat at Tswalu, and both Tswalu and Londolozi sold jackets, hats, gloves, and fleeces) but there is no guarantee that you will like these, or that your size will be in stock. And they are expensive, as compared with the prices at, for example, Cape Union Mart, the chain of camping and outdoor apparel and accessories with a convenient-for-tourists branch in Cape Town at The Waterfront. (My partner's one purchase of the trip was a 90 ZAR baseball cap emblazoned with the Big 5 from Cape Union Mart. He prizes it very highly and was distraught when it blew off his head during a nighttime game drive at Tswalu. (My Tilley hat, which tied under the chin, remained firmly in place even during the bumpiest and fastest off-road drives) Thankfully our diligent ranger, Kyle, and tracker David, were able to recover the hat after repeated, spotlit drives back and forth along the track in the Land Rover)



Apart from all that, aimed for first-time safari-goers, I will also offer this thought: Most of the other guests at our two lodges were veterans, and many had been to a dozen or more camps in various regions of Africa. Almost NONE of these lovely people were kitted out in ensembles of khaki safari gear--zip-off pants, Buzz-Off insect proof shirts, etc etc. (I did see a few cameras whose long lenses were shrouded in camoflauge, though)

What did they wear? Most of them (almost all Europeans apart from a couple from Johannesburg who were at Londolozi for the wedding of one of the Varty daughters, and one couple--he originally from Zimbabwe; she of French/Phillipine heritage, both now living in Singapore--who shared our vehicle for two days of drives, also at Londolozi) sported jeans, t-shirts in sober colors, regular sneakers/trainers with socks, and headgear that included quite a few baseball-type brimmed caps.

There was one khaki-encased older woman, a travel agent from Florida, and one of the few Americans we encountered, who had obviously done a lot of hunting of Africana souvenirs--her sneakers dangled furry animals from the laces and her tote bag sported other furry mammals, porcupine quill earrings festooned her ears and beaded Masai and faux elephant hair bracelets her wrists. Her logo-stamped clothing attested to the other camps she had visited. She looked faintly ridiculous. To me.

Apart from observing my fellow, more experienced, guests, I asked rangers, camp staff, and assorted South Africans and the consensus was: “When we go on safari ourselves, we wear jeans, comfortable tops and, often, baseball caps.”
I will remember this for next time! Just make sure to leave the bright reds and chartreuses behind.

As for Cape Town, the city is casual with a capital “C.” I could probably count the number of men I saw in suits on one hand (these seemed to be business travelers staying at the Mt. Nelson; we certainly saw no one wearing a suit and tie in any of the excellent restaurants we visited.) I wore black jeans almost every night in Cape Town, and my partner wore cotton trousers in a neutral color. Blue jeans would have been fine as well, as long as the ensemble was well-fitting, neat and clean and paired with footwear other than beach shoes. The general style of dress was much more relaxed than in our home city, New York, and more akin, I suppose, to California.>
ekscrunchy is offline  
Sep 4th, 2016, 05:40 PM
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Sorry, no way would I wear jeans. Granted, I go in February, which is Kenya's summer and very hot, so I'd die of heat stroke in jeans, not to mention that there's no way they'd ever dry when the camp laundered them and they'd weigh a ton to pack! Not to mention I wouldn't want to sit constricted in them in a hot vehicle for hours on end any more than I would a long car ride or flight at home. The safari wear that you so easily dismiss is wonderful for its moisture wicking quality while wearing it as well as the ability for it to be laundered, dried and returned to you same day in the heat of Africa. Most veteran safari goers as well as those I've met on my three safaris so far were similarly attired fro the same reasons. From what I've seen so far in Kenya and Tanzania, I'd chalk jeans-wearing travelers up to "they'll learn this time for next time" novices.
amyb is offline  
Sep 5th, 2016, 04:09 AM
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Then it must be different there; I have not been to Kenya in years. My comments were about trips to SA and Bots.
ekscrunchy is offline  
Sep 9th, 2016, 11:50 AM
  #10  
TC
 
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I have to agree. We saw no one in jeans in Kenya, Tanzania or Botswana. I buy and wear "safaristyle" clothing, but don't pay for the top end camping stuff. Tee shirts from Target or Kohls in dusky colors and the light weight camping pants work fine. Layers are great. Don't laugh....but a lot of those high end, zip-off, camp pants end up on the racks at Goodwill. Have a look if you're in a big enough city. People buy all that high end stuff for their trip, then never wear it again, so off it goes. It's surprising what you might find.
TC is offline  
Sep 10th, 2016, 12:12 AM
  #11  
 
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I'd also say jeans were a no-no on safari, and I've just done my 30th trip. Even if the weather is cold enough for them to be comfortable (as I'm sure it is in some months in Southern Africa), there is the laundry issue and the weight issue. I am guessing most lodges in South Africa are a bit better connected to mains electricity and perhaps they have washers and dryers for laundry, but in other countries many safari camps still do laundry by hand and air dry it.

I have some proper outdoor wear trousers, but I also like loose linen trousers for hot weather. I also happily wear sandals on game drives in hot weather, and I disagree that red is a complete no no for clothing either. Clothing colour only matters for walks (and then it is crucial). In Kenya, many guides are dressed in traditional Masai wear- top to toe in red. The only colour I would totally avoid is white- with dust and sunscreen, after one safari you will probably never get it white again. And in tsetse areas I would also avoid dark shades, but that should not be an issue in Kenya (where the OP is going I believe).
stokeygirl is offline  
Sep 10th, 2016, 07:41 AM
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Have no idea really, but I'd guess not too big. The time we have taken a duffle it has been the kind that has a bottom separate compartment which we found to be very nice to have to separate some clothes not needed for a part of the trip. don't know if that applies for a safari.
Gretchen is offline  
Sep 10th, 2016, 12:11 PM
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The conversations about clothing were most often with the rangers and guests in the two upscale SA camps I visited a couple of years ago--Londolozi and Tswalu. The guests who arrived at Londo for the Varty wedding, who were taken out on game drives, did not for the most part wear any kind of special "safari" gear. But perhaps this is particular to Sabi Sands, where at least some camps do use machines for washing.
ekscrunchy is offline  
Sep 15th, 2016, 09:46 AM
  #14  
TC
 
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There is a big difference between not wearing "special safari gear" and packing jeans. Light weight cargo pants in earth colors can be purchased anywhere..cheaply. The same for tee shirts, pullovers, fleece layers...even hats. It just takes a little planning and thought.
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Sep 18th, 2016, 03:31 PM
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Each trip we take, we pack less. It depends on the time of year, but most camps have stores where you can buy a sweat shirt, fleece, hats, gloves, scarves, etc if you need them (then you have souvenirs). Jeans take up space, and if you are going when the temps are high (90-110F) you won't even want to look at them. Predators are more or less "color blind" and for that matter, the Masai wear a lot of purple,red, and orange so the khaki thing is not a must for any reasons other than that dirt doesn't show as much on earth tones.
uhoh_busted is offline  
Sep 18th, 2016, 03:40 PM
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I will state, however, that we did buy all the "right earth toned stuff" for our first safari trip in 2004, so except for augmenting with some pastel t-shirts (you will be layering) and a good light-weight flannel-lined nylon jacket with a hood, this past year, that stuff lasts forever. And if you travel over and back in jeans, you'll have them in case you feel you need them.

It is more important to bring your own pair of binoculars.
uhoh_busted is offline  
Sep 19th, 2016, 04:09 AM
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I think it's risky to say "most camps will have places to buy..." I've been in 16 different camps and lodges so far and not one had any clothing for sale (I would have bought it as a souvenir), and only one had a small shop where you could buy toothpaste or the like.

I do agree in bringing less each time, relying on laundry at the camps if they have it.
amyb is offline  
Sep 21st, 2016, 08:31 PM
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huh. Interesting. I think every place we've stayed in Botswana, Zimbabwe, and South Africa has a small souvenir shop. That's only about a dozen, though. So probably not a fair sample, and it doesn't include anywhere in East Africa. They make really nice keepsakes. Takes some of the sting out of mowing the lawn when my hubby puts on his Sandibe cap.
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Sep 22nd, 2016, 06:59 AM
  #19  
TC
 
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I think if you follow the whole thread, the poster is saying it's risky to assume you will find "clothing" at the gift shops that would do rather than packing from home. Big difference between not having shirts and buying a baseball cap.
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