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Thigh high waders are funny but thigh high support hose is serious business

Thigh high waders are funny but thigh high support hose is serious business

Old Apr 11th, 2009, 10:41 AM
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Thigh high waders are funny but thigh high support hose is serious business

First, for the record my waders are the bib overall type, not the thigh high. But on to the serious business...

I went to the travel clinic on Friday and have these tidbits to share. Second, for the record I am not trying to play doctor or pharmacist. I'm just mentioning these things so you can discuss them with the medical professionals you trust.

For flights over 4 hours the doctor recommended support stockings to reduce the risk of deep vein thrombosis. He thought the knee high ones would be sufficient for me, but also mentioned the thigh high ones. I saw both kinds at Walgreens. You have to measure your calf diameter and the distance from floor to calf to determine your proper size for the knee highs. I don't know what you measure for the thigh highs because I didn't check the package.

In case you are thinking that these stockings are for old ladies or people with arthritis, that's not true. The stockings are unisex and you can wear regular socks over them. At greater risk than old people are smokers of any age and women on oral contraceptives. Smoking and birth control pills combined, up the risk.

He also suggested NOT taking Ambien or similar sleeping pills on the plane so that you could get up and move around better during the flight. Although leg lifts and such in your seat help too. I have violated that advice, especially sitting near the window. But I do ankle rotations and muscle contractions.

Some parts of Asia are now resistant to the malaria medication in Malarone so Larium is requried there. He said the physchological side effects of Larium equal those of Chloroquine, which is commonly prescribed for Central or South America. But I think Malarone is less than either. He asked my background using malaria meds and when I said I had had zero problems with either Malarone or Larium, he replied he'd be comfortable prescribing either and mentioned that Larium may end up costing me less.

A few years ago the travel clinic doc I used had a military background and he said he did not like prescribing Larium if there was an alternative. I think there had been problems with some of the soldiers. Of course that was a huge sample of people so the incidence of problems would be higher.

The travel doc recommended a Meningococca l(Menactra) shot even though I had a meningitis prevention shot in the past. This one is supposed to be better and last for life.

For people born after 1956 and before (I forget, maybe late 60s and 70s) he suggested a test to be sure you are immune to measles.

It's not like he was pushing vaccines to make a sale. He said any of these "pokes" plus some others we discussed could be done with my regular doctor and did not have to be done at the travel clinic.

His sources said Deet of about 35% is adequate for mosquito protection and there is no need to use the 95% or 100% Deet. I had thought a higher % was better. He advised going with Deet for short term use instead of other alternatives. The brand he suggested was Ultrathon.

For heavily mosquito infested areas, he suggested Permethrin to treat your clothes. I've never used it during my dry season travels to Africa, but I'd consider it for other locations or for traveling in Africa when there are more mosquitos.

He also mentioned ORS packets (oral rehydration solutions) that can be bought online or in outdoor stores in case you get bad diarrhea and need to rehydrate. An alternative to a prepacked ORS was mentioned in some literature: Drink 8 oz of fruit juice plus 1/2 tsp corn syrup or honey or sugar, plus a pinch of salt. Then drink 8oz. potable water plus a 1/4 tsp of baking soda.

A nurse that I dealt with briefly said to me, "I'm telling you this and I would tell it to an 80 year old nun if she were here for international travel advice. The most common disease we see people return with after traveling is one of the sexually transmitted diseases."
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Old Apr 11th, 2009, 01:40 PM
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>>Some parts of Asia are now resistant to the malaria medication in Malarone so Larium is requried there.
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Old Apr 11th, 2009, 04:48 PM
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Good info and I have started to always carry the oral re-hydration tablets after seeing my H get very ill and dehydrated. Also, after a recent trip, I will always carry not only Cipro but an antibiotic for upper respiratory(maybe a Z Pac) and anti-nausea suppositories.
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Old Apr 11th, 2009, 06:26 PM
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Moremiles, what do you carry for upper respiratory?
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Old Apr 11th, 2009, 06:34 PM
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Next time I will ask my Dr. for a Z-Pac for upper respiratory infections-it's an antibiotic that I've taken for bronchitis and it's inexpensive and not too lengthy a course.
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Old Apr 11th, 2009, 07:51 PM
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Great advice Lynn. I also always travel with rehydration tablets as well as antibiotics and anti nausea medication. I just go into our local travel doctor and buy the med kit for Africa which is (of course) filled with prescription items to suit the traveller. Just in case. I was also given the advice about not drugging yourself on the flight so that you could keep mobile. I used an anti air sickness tablet which made me just a little relaxed, but not a sleeping tablet.
If only they made economy class more comfortable!
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Old Apr 11th, 2009, 09:49 PM
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Sometimes moving around on the fligh is not enough, wear the stockings. On my last flight - Hong Kong to Vancouver I developed a blood clot in my leg which then broke off and went to my lungs (pulmonary embolism). Not fun, spent a week in the hospital and a further 3 weeks off work. You don't want to mess around with blood clots. Heck of a way to end a vacation.
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Old Apr 12th, 2009, 04:58 PM
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DJCat, that must have been an awful experience.
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Old Apr 12th, 2009, 05:05 PM
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DJCat, how terrible!
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Old Apr 12th, 2009, 05:52 PM
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Sorry to hear that DJ and that convinces me even more to get and wear the stockings!
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Old Apr 13th, 2009, 06:42 AM
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atravelynn, are you sure you didn't mix up Larium and Malerone? I'm almost positive that I've read that there are areas in Asia that are resistant to Larium, not Malerone. And Malerone is a relatively new drug, probably not around long enough to develop a high amount of resistance.
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Old Apr 13th, 2009, 02:57 PM
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Maybe I heard it wrong. Nothing was written down for me, since I am not going there.

That bears my repeating, "for the record I am not trying to play doctor or pharmacist. I'm just mentioning these things so you can discuss them with the medical professionals you trust."

But I got the support hose part right, I have no doubt! I'll be buying a pair.
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Old Apr 13th, 2009, 03:22 PM
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I guess it is a good idea tocheck with your Travel local health clinic as atravelyn did.

If you are taking Cipro with you...then you can for sure use this for Bronchitis ( Cipro cost more)

Also Cipo can and is used for Gastroenteritis.... that is when you have bad diarrhea and stomach cramps.

But only if the diarrhea is acute and causing disability.
I take it with me always but only used it once.

I have and also take with me Tamiflu ( I got the flu in Alexandria and also in Alice Springs Australia)... who want to have the flu on a holiday !!!!

If you do not use the Tamiflu....then you just bring it back home...it is good for about 5 years from the date of purchase.

About DEET:

The myth about DEET is that the higher the percentage of DEET, the better the protection!

Let me tellyou this:

The precentage of DEET in any product tell you HOW LONG it provides prtection >
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Old Apr 13th, 2009, 03:51 PM
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oops I posted before I was finished,.!

So 25-30% DEET protects for about 6 hours and this is the most recommended dose for any age group.

30% DEET is just as effective as 95 % DEET.... so save your money !
1. Deep Woods Off (Pump Spray).....has 23.75 % DEET

2.Deep Woods Off for Sportsmen ( Aerosol Spray)... has 28.5 % DEET

3.Muskol (Pump Spray)....... has 28.5 % DEET

4.Watkins ( good product, Insect repellent in Lotion) ....has 28.5 % DEET

5. Finally, Ultrathon (by 3M in Lotion)...has 33% DEET
provides longer protection with LESS DEET absorption.

Now a comment about Malaria

1.If you are in a Malaria area and even though you are taking Malarone...if you get a fever and are sick

2.Go to the hospital or a clinic.

3.In any Malaria infested area,the medical people know how to check for Malaria.

4. When you fever is highest is the best time to check you blood.

5.They just draw a small amount of blood....then they make two slides ( tell them to make TWO slides if they are only making one)

6. Then they smear a small amount of your blood on the slide and add a fixation chemical to lyse the Red Blood Cells on the glass slide.

7. Then they start looking at the slide under a microscope for about 10 to 15 minutes ( none of this 2-3 minute looking stuff)... to see if they can spot the parasite.

8. If they see it then okay ..BUT if they don't ,then ASK for a copy of one of the slides and do NOT take no for an answer.!!!! (Your are entitled to it !!)

9. Take the slide home with you ,so your local medical lab/pathologist can look at it.
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Old Apr 13th, 2009, 04:38 PM
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Great comments on the malaria test. None of that would have ever occurred to me.
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Old Apr 13th, 2009, 07:16 PM
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Glad I could help atravelynn..... you are so helpful to everybody else.
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Old Apr 13th, 2009, 08:08 PM
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But I hope nobody ever needs to put that info to use, Percy!
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Old Apr 14th, 2009, 08:48 AM
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I agree atravelynn

We all take medications with us hoping we never have to use them.

My friend just got back from Viet Nam this morning and said everyone in his group of six got diarrhea for a few days..he took Cipro and was better in a day..so he must have had a bug !
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Old Apr 15th, 2009, 08:31 AM
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Is there a time when you would not use Cipro, when you have Travellers Diarrhea?

Can you take Tamiflu before your trip,so as not to be susceptible to the Flu.?

Thanks .
Good Point atravelynn and Percy
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Old Apr 15th, 2009, 09:25 AM
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I've used Cipro just a couple of times with excellent results. I also was told by the travel doc that unlike many meds where you are directed to finish the entire bottle of pills, you can take Cipro until your problem goes away and then stop treatment.


Regarding prevention tactics--I ran into a couple who said their doctor told them to do this and that he did it too: When going to an area where you think you might have stomach problems, take a half or quarter of a Cipro each day for prevention. I've never done this and I'd be hesitant to use the drug for prevention.
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