Out of Africa

Aug 27th, 2018, 06:50 PM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
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Following along in my usual quiet manner

Love the pictures , for those of us that have been on a Safari it is a happy trip down memory lane.

Waiting for Lake Manyara and Ngorongoro Crater.

Once again Thank You for doing a trip report.

( When I did my trip report I also called it Out of Africa !!! )
Percy is online now  
Aug 28th, 2018, 10:42 AM
  #22  
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Percy, Not the most original name, I know! But itís all I could think of at the time.
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Aug 28th, 2018, 11:56 AM
  #23  
 
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It is a good Title laurieco, I got my title from the Movie "Out of Africa" from the book that was written by Karen Blixen.
It also helped that I visited Karen Blixen gravesite just outside of Copenhagen Denmark

Looking forward to Lake Manyara and Ngorongoro Crater.
---------------------------------


Here are the first 3 lines from my trip report.



Out of Africa Trip Report
"There is something about a Safari life that makes you forget all your sorrows and feel the whole time you you had drunk a half bottle of Champagne.....bubbling with heartfelt gratitude for being alive ... Isak Dinesen( Karen Blixen) author of Out of Africa

Decribing the plains... Isak Dinesen wrote "The views were immensely wide . Everything that you saw made for greatness and freedom and un equalled beauty"

Having just returned from a 3 and a half week Safari, I can understand the above comments by Karen Blixen.

Percy is online now  
Aug 28th, 2018, 04:37 PM
  #24  
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I'm going to take a break tonight but will continue the report tomorrow evening, if anyone is still interested!
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Aug 28th, 2018, 04:46 PM
  #25  
 
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I am still interested and awaiting the next installment.
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Aug 29th, 2018, 04:29 AM
  #26  
 
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Laurie: Still VERY interested, and looking forward to more. I must say, I like the way Fodor's is sending me emails when something new or a new chapter of your report is up. Combined with your excellent photos, it makes an exciting morning read!! What camera are you using?
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Aug 29th, 2018, 05:14 AM
  #27  
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Taconictraveler, I used an Olympus E-PL5, a micro four thirds. A sort of hybrid DSLR. I also used my iPhone X but the above photos were taken with the Olympus.

Iíll continue the report tonight when I get home from work. Thanks for the kind words!
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Aug 29th, 2018, 06:43 AM
  #28  
 
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Yes Sir , I am very interested and following along.
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Aug 29th, 2018, 04:40 PM
  #29  
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The following morning, after breakfast and getting our boxed lunch to take along, we set out for the approximately one hour drive to Lake Manyara. and Lake Manyara National Park, which is home to tree climbing lions. I don't know if lions anywhere else climb trees but we did not see them anywhere else. The area also hosts a wide variety of animals such as elephants, zebras, wildebeests, baboons, giraffes and other animals, and of course lions. We spent maybe 2 to 3 hours here. The highlight was seeing lions in trees. When we first came to the park, a herd of elephants were crossing so we stopped and watched them for about 20 minutes. The walked right in front of the vehicle and it was almost as though you could reach out and touch them. Even though we had seen dozens, possibly hundreds of elephants by this point, it was still a spectacle. We made our way to the lake area, passing packs of baboons. The lake gave us our first up-close view of hippos. They are even bigger than I imagined. The area next to the lake where we had our lunch was one of the few places where we were allowed to walk around. There was a walkway leading out over the water and we walked to the end of it and back, stretching our legs. It took about 30 minutes to do the round trip. We then had our lunch at one of the picnic tables set up. I found it amusing that whenever we had a picnic lunch, Silas would put a tablecloth over the table to dress it up. It was a nice touch. The picnic lunches were nothing to write home about, but they were enough to keep us satisfied.



After lunch, we drove away from the shore of the lake back into the heart of the park in search of lions. We were not disappointed. We saw several lions lazing on tree branches. They looked very content in the trees. I wish we could have seen a lion actually climbing a tree, but we did not. Lake Manyara was my least favorite game drive destination. That is not to say I did not enjoy it, I did, and I especially loved seeing the lions in trees, but the other destinations had a lot more, maybe because they are larger and have more animals. I would recommend going to Lake Manyara for a few hours when going to or in the Ngorongoro region. The lions alone make it worth the trip.



After having our fill of lions, we left the park and made our way to our lodge for the next two nights, the Kitela Lodge in Karatu, in the Ngorongoro Crater region. The Kitela Lodge is the only place we stayed that did not have wild animals roaming around as it overlooked a coffee plantation. That said, it was also the nicest place we stayed as far as accommodations are concerned. As soon as we arrived, we were greeted with cold towels and a nice South African sparkling wine. After getting checked in, we were shown to our cottage, which was beautiful, with a fireplace, large bathroom and veranda. We decided to put on our bathing suits and go to the pool, where we were served more drinks. I think I had another sparkling wine. We were told that this place did not include alcoholic drinks so we bought a couple of bottles of wine in Karatu before getting there, but they did include it and the choice was even better than at Maramboi (anyone who knows me also knows that I love champagne and good sparkling wines so this was a treat to have it included). After showers, we sat on our veranda and had a glass of wine before going to the happy hour, which is called a sundowner in Africa. Happy hour was spent on the terrace of the restaurant. Hors d'oeuvres were set up on tables and the bar was just inside but a waiter would bring drinks if you felt like waiting. We didn't, and drank sparkling wine of course. Dinner, which was served outside on the terrace, was pretty good but I really cannot remember what we ate. Some of the food was buffet, but waiters also served soup and the main dishes. After dinner, we went back to the room where we called for someone to light the fire in the fireplace, and opened one of the bottles of wine and sat by the fire. The following day we were going into Ngorongoro Crater, which is on most peoples' list of places to see in Northern Tanzania due to the diversity of wildlife in the crater. That will be the next chapter.



Baboons


Tree climbing lions



Our gorgeous bathroom


Lake Manyara
laurieco is online now  
Aug 30th, 2018, 06:39 AM
  #30  
 
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Thanks laurieco for the Lake Manyara segment.

I saw a lion climb the tree.
They do it the same way as a cheetah or leopard but they do not ( maybe cannot ) climb as high as the other two.

You mentioned baboons:

We had a private tour guide and when we pulled up to a gate there were lots of baboons around.

We had bananas and my friend stuck his hand out with a peeled banana and the baboon quickly grabbed it.

Our guide was outside at the gate and when he saw that a banana was being fed to the baboon........ he yelled out and came running and said

"Don't you that again, your're lucky you didn't loose your arm ".

He said a tourist from England last year got his arm mangled by a baboon for rolling down the window and feeding the baboon.

Just thought I would mention that, for those planning a Safari

----------------

and now back to laurieco's Ngorongoro segment and pictures.

Thanks again laurieco , I am enjoying all this
Percy is online now  
Aug 30th, 2018, 07:40 AM
  #31  
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Thanks Percy.

It it is strictly forbidden to feed the animals anywhere. Why would your friend blatantly go against the rules? The animals are in their natural environment and must feed themselves. Your guide was right to yell, but more important than your friend possibly getting his arm mangled, he was interfering with nature. That is inexcusable. Sorry to sound so harsh but what he did was so wrong on so many levels.
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Aug 30th, 2018, 08:06 AM
  #32  
 
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Really great trip report!
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Aug 30th, 2018, 08:48 AM
  #33  
 
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Your right laurieco, No Feeding of Animals.

He just got caught up in the moment and did something stupid on an impulse as the baboons came right up to the window, so your

holding bananas and thought he would feed them.

You know the old saying: When your holding a hammer ,the whole world looks like a nail !!

He was lucky.
Not as lucky as the British guy last year !!
Percy is online now  
Aug 30th, 2018, 12:24 PM
  #34  
 
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Thank you Laurieco for the work you're putting into this report. Your evocative words and photos take me back IN to --not "out of" -- Africa.
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Aug 30th, 2018, 01:09 PM
  #35  
 
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Yep am back there too!!

Just reviewed my pictures from the Ngorongoro Crater.

It is very nice to get other people's perspectives, so I am truly enjoying this report
Percy is online now  
Sep 1st, 2018, 10:00 AM
  #36  
 
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Following along as this is my next big trip. Pics are fantastic
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Sep 1st, 2018, 10:56 AM
  #37  
 
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This is a great report, Laurieco. Love the detaills.

We just returned from Kenya and Tanzania in mid-August so you're bringing back lots of memories. So glad that we can now post pictures, too, as they reallyy add to a trip report.

Thank you for taking the time to write this and helping so many of us relive a great time In Africa!
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Sep 1st, 2018, 11:49 AM
  #38  
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Iím pretty busy this weekend but will pick up on Monday. Glad people are enjoying it!
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Sep 1st, 2018, 02:22 PM
  #39  
 
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Okay laurieco

Since this is Labour intensive report and it is Labour Day Long Weekend, we will cut you some slack
Percy is online now  
Sep 3rd, 2018, 02:05 PM
  #40  
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After a nice weekend, I am ready to continue my report for those of you still following along.

The following morning, after breakfast and getting our boxed lunch to take along, we drove to the Ngorongoro Crater. The drive took between 30-45 minutes but when we got to the area to register the vehicle and pay for and get our passes (all taken care of by Silas) there were loads of vehicles already there, lined up waiting to do the same. There must have been 25-30 Land Cruisers. We had to wait about 20 minutes, give or take a few, and then we were allowed to begin our descent into the crater.

The crater, which formed about 2.5 million years ago when a volcano collapsed, covers about 100 square miles and is about 2000 feet deep. It is home to an enormous amount of wildlife, many of which stay there year round, rather than make the trip up and down. Like many of the protected areas in Tanzania, it is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The floor of the crater is mostly grasslands and is open and not forested, thus affording vast views of the area. But prey still manages to hide from predators, and predators from prey. Not long after making the descent to the bottom, which took maybe 25 minutes (my memory is a bit hazy on some things) we got our first look of a male lion, albeit from a distance that required binoculars to properly see it, and telephoto lenses to capture it. Other animals we saw in the crater were hyenas zebras, water buffalo, hippopotamus, jackals, crown cranes, ostrich, impala, gazelle, wildebeest, elephants, flamingos as well as others that I am sure I forgot. We also "saw" another cheetah, and a rhino, but the cheetah was pretty far away, and the rhino was so far away, even looking at it through binoculars, it was merely a spot. You could have told me it was a vampire and I would have no way to challenge it (other than not believing in vampires). I honestly don't know how Silas could tell it was in fact a rhino but I have no reason to doubt it as he really knows his stuff. We spent quite a long time in the crater. It is definitely a must see.





Male lion


Another male




View of the crater


View of the crater


View of the crater


Male impala



Crown cranes


Zebra


Zebra


Zebra


Ostrich


Hippo


Water buffalo
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