help on binoculars

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Apr 20th, 2000, 10:35 AM
  #1
joanne
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help on binoculars

Hi. I am going on a safari in June. I am
totally ignorant when it comes to what
size/type binoculars to get and roughly how
much they would cost? I have a small pair
that are good for the ballet but I suspect
they arent strong enough for animal viewing.
also my hmo said I only need 3 shots:
yellow fever, hepatitis A i think and a
polio booster. plus malaria pills. Meanwhile
my companions in another state are told to
get 6 shots. any help on this would be
appreciated. thanks.
 
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Apr 20th, 2000, 10:57 PM
  #2
April
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I have a small pair of 8x24 Pentax binoculars (with fold-down eyepieces for glasses wearers) that are great for travel, at home and even at the opera. I can't remember exactly what they cost - maybe $75 to $100 US. They now have really slim ones for over $100. The best thing to do is just go to a store and try them out as some will feel more comfortable than others.

I would not get anything much more powerful because shaking becomes an issue.

What shots you need depend on where you're going, but I would make sure my tetanus was up to date.
 
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Apr 21st, 2000, 01:14 AM
  #3
Nigel
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Binoculars will be one of the most important part of your safari, it is important that you get a good pair.
You need 'Field Glasses' at least 10 x 50, you can usually find some second hand rather than buying new.
It depends on where you are going in Africa on what shots you need, and quite honestly if you are going to be staying in good hotels and lodges, you don't really need any shots, unless they are required for entry to the Country.All the travel advisories 'recommend' rather than 'require' shots.
Malaria pills are important - be careful of Larium, it has bad side effects. But once again it depends on the Countries you are visiting, since June is Winter in Southern Africa, with very little malaria although it is best to be safe rather than sorry!
N
 
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Apr 21st, 2000, 03:45 AM
  #4
David
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Joanne:
We are going to Kenya in June. Where are you going? Only shots we have to get (and we got them two days ago) were yellow fever shots but only because we are going after that to Seychelles and only because it is Seychelle's reqirement for visitors are coming from Kenya. The best and safest source of information is www.cdc.gov/travel You will also find there a phone number so you could call them directly or simply go to the travel clinic at your hospital. But if you decide to get some shots be prepare that poeple there will try to put some pressure on you to get a few other shots too. They are not cheap and our insurance will not pay for them. Remember they are only recommended and it is your choice.
 
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Apr 21st, 2000, 04:10 AM
  #5
Bert
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The most useful binoculars on safari are very light with about 8X magnification; anything bigger is difficult to hold still. Optical quality of the glass is very important, so if you can afford it go for the best like Zeiss, Leica, Swarovski etc. A good source for reasonably priced binocs is the American Birding Association - have a look at their homepage at http://www.americanbirding.org/

As for shots, yellow fever is required for East Africa, and a tetanus and polio booster are advisable. Plus malaria pills, of course. Most of the other shots are superfluous, imho.

 
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Apr 21st, 2000, 05:14 AM
  #6
kwang
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Here is a link to a page in Meade's web
site about how to select binocular:

http://www.meade.com/support/selbinoc.html
 
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Apr 21st, 2000, 06:11 AM
  #7
David
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Joanne:
I just checked www.cdc.gov and yellow fever is only recommended. Call your Travel Clinic. But I agree with Bert on binoculars. Invest money in Leica (I am speaking from my own experience)or others he mentioned. Go for the best binoculars, take twice more film than you think you will need, and have a best time.
 
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Apr 21st, 2000, 05:41 PM
  #8
Al
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From experience in traveling the unpaved roads of East Africa, we can say that your hands are your most common source of bacteria-borne problems. Buy a bottle of Purell (or similar) waterless hand cleanser and use it religiously. A supply of Imodium-D (anti-diarrheal) can be a lifesaver at times, too. By all means, make sure your tetanus booster shot is up-to-date. And keep your hands away from your mouth and eyes unless you are absolutely sure your hands have been disinfected and are completely clean. Clip your fingernails short because they harbor more germs than you could possibly believe. Leave any and all rings at home.
 
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