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Being obsessive, starting 2021 research. Basic Israel & Jordan!

Being obsessive, starting 2021 research. Basic Israel & Jordan!

Nov 30th, 2019, 01:03 PM
  #1  
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Being obsessive, starting 2021 research. Basic Israel & Jordan!

Love to research. We usually have between 2 and 4 other people join us in trips. Background: proud Texans, 76 years old and aging (rest are going through puberty in their 60s), travel business class, stay 4 (some 5 stars) hotels, love history and scenery, wines and regional food, about 10 days (not a lot of time but my wife won't leave her Cavalier's for very long), don't mind renting a car, have visited close to 50 countries - including "one" day in Israel about 20 years ago. Would appreciate your thoughts on getting me started.

1. Use to use AMEX miles through Delta until they lost their minds. Been looking at Turkish Airlines out of Houston. Any thoughts?
2. Looking at King David Hotel in Jerusalem, but looks pricy. Would like to keep nightly rates between USD$300 - $400. Suggestions? Going to France in May and will be using a couple of AIRBNB's - very first time.
3. If we rent a car in Israel, what other areas to visit? We generally prefer at least 3 nights in any location.
4. What are the must see?
5. Would you suggest I consider private guides in some of the locations?
6. We usually travel to Europe in May or around end of Sept or first of Oct -- weather nice and crowds manageable. When should we go to Israel?
6. How much problem to do trip to Petra? Overnight trip?

I am sure I will think of more questions as soon as I post. Thanks for sharing your knowledge.
Philip is offline  
Nov 30th, 2019, 04:05 PM
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Can't comment on Israel, haven't been.

I think that Petra deserves at least three nights/two days. See: https://mytimetotravel.wordpress.com...eerless-petra/
thursdaysd is offline  
Nov 30th, 2019, 04:51 PM
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1) Turkish is a great airline and and it's worth trying to squeeze in a short stopover in Istanbul.

2) I can't afford to stay in expensive hotels so don't have personal experience, but I think that staying in the King David is probably worth a splurge. As alternative lodging look into the other historic luxury hotel of Jerusalem the American Colony Hotel.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Colony_Hotel

3-4) The Dead Sea, Massada, Bethlehem, Mar Saba monastery, St. George Monastery, Jericho, Akko, Haifa, Yaffa, Galilea. If you like wine as you said, you should try to visit the winery of the Cremisan monastery.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cremisan_Valley

5) If you hire private guides make sure to hire alternately Arab guides and Jewish guides to give you the full picture. Guides from both sides are often quite propagandistic, balance it by listening to both sides.

6) May can be already very hot and September/October may still be very hot. Early spring March/April is the best, but try to avoid Easter(both Catholic and Orthodox), late fall(October/November) is the second best, the landscape is not as green and lush as in spring.

Going to Petra is not a problem, but it takes time. You need at the very least a full day on the site, that means staying for at least 2 nights. I spent 3 days in Petra, but to be honest getting the most out of the site requires lots of hiking, so for elderly travellers like you, seeing the main sights which are easier to access shall suffice and 1 day is enough for that. Note: You can't drive a rental car from Israel to Jordan, so you'll have to take bus/taxi to the border, cross it on your own and take another taxi/bus from the other side. Taking a daytrip to Petra is a very bad idea(although travel agencies in Israel offer this tour), because you wond't have enough time to take in the site.
BDKR is offline  
Nov 30th, 2019, 05:19 PM
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Yes Turkish is very good and their biz lounge is well regarded as one of the best in the world.
Agree about Masada, the Dead Sea which you should try to float in. Actually you can't sink in it its so buoyant. Also agree about Galilee, Akko, and all else BDKR said.
We used private guides and though costly the experience was so rewarding I have no regrets. As for Bethlehem do be aware that no Israeli is allowed entry but if you use an Israeli guide they have agreements with Palestinian counterparts who will meet you at the gate for your tour. The best part is th Church of the Nativity and below the altar is where Jesus was born and where he was lain and these spots are commemorated. The advantage of a private guide is you can go below the altar with minimal waiting whereas with bus groups it could take up to two hours.
In Jerusalem see the Church of the Holy Sepulchre were you can touch the slab Jesus was laid on after the crucifixion. also visit the Spanish steps and the western wall.
I highly recommend a private guide which though costly ($550.00 per day for the two of us in 2011) will enhance your experience immeasurably as well as cut times in lines and is a far more personal.
Also see the Garden of Gethsemane, the Dome of the Rock, the Church of the Annunciation and much more. As there will be 4-6 of you and as you seem to have the budget definitely get a private guide. Let them do the leg work. Israeli private guides have to pass exams, are licensed and it like having a private history teacher escort you.
I can provide a recommendation if you like. The guy I used is actually in the US for a business trip and is currently in Houston I think. He is a former tank commander actually. You will be in good hands.
Knock down an Israeli beer or two as well.
Oh and as for weather we went in late Oct. early Nov. and it was perfect.

Last edited by jacketwatch; Nov 30th, 2019 at 05:25 PM.
jacketwatch is offline  
Nov 30th, 2019, 05:32 PM
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This is the spot below the Church of the Nativity commemorating the spot where Jesus was born.

This is where his manger was.
jacketwatch is offline  
Nov 30th, 2019, 05:35 PM
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You must see the Holocaust museum. This commemorates the head of a Jewish orphanage who refused to leave the children and he perished in the camps.
jacketwatch is offline  
Nov 30th, 2019, 05:39 PM
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Masada


Floating in the Dead Sea. You can't sink unless you have cement shoes on. .
jacketwatch is offline  
Nov 30th, 2019, 06:09 PM
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"You must see the Holocaust museum. This commemorates the head of a Jewish orphanage who refused to leave the children and he perished in the camps."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janusz_Korczak

"Knock down an Israeli beer or two as well."

And a Palestinian beer: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taybeh_Brewery

Last edited by BDKR; Nov 30th, 2019 at 06:14 PM.
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Nov 30th, 2019, 07:05 PM
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Originally Posted by BDKR View Post
"You must see the Holocaust museum. This commemorates the head of a Jewish orphanage who refused to leave the children and he perished in the camps."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janusz_Korczak

"Knock down an Israeli beer or two as well."

And a Palestinian beer: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taybeh_Brewery
And as long as your at it try the local version of Oozu made in Bethlehem.
Thank you for the links.
jacketwatch is offline  
Nov 30th, 2019, 08:10 PM
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OP, are you affiliated with -- or interested in -- any particular religion? The reason I ask is because, if you are, that will help focus your trip. With 10 days (actually less, if you're going to Petra), there is so much to see in Israel that you can't even crack the surface of it.

In general, a good 10 day trip to Israel would be flying into TLV airport, renting a car from there, heading directly to the North for 2-3 days (lots of different options for places to stay and things to do in the North), heading back to Tel Aviv and dropping off the car, staying in Tel Aviv for a night or two, and then heading over to Jerusalem for as much time as you have. From Jerusalem, you should do a day trip to Masada and TLV. You don't want or need a car in Jerusalem or Tel Aviv.

Instead of doing a Petra round trip from Israel, consider just going one way to Petra and then flying home from Amman. There is other cool stuff in Jordan, but in 10 days, you don't have much time.

As far as when to go, you should anytime near/around the major Jewish holidays, particularly Passover/Pesach in the Spring and Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur and Sukkot in the Fall. Things are really expensive because it is a common time for travel, and there a lot of closures on the religious holidays. You can find the 2021 holiday schedule here: https://www.hebcal.com/holidays/2021


Originally Posted by jacketwatch View Post
Also see the Garden of Gethsemane, the Dome of the Rock, the Church of the Annunciation and much more.
Only Muslims can go inside the Dome of the Rock and inside the Al Aqsa Mosque. Non-Muslims can visit the Temple Mount in theory, but visiting hours are very limited and subject to change/closure due to random security issues. OP should hope to visit it, but not be disappointed if it doesn't work out.

I highly recommend a private guide which though costly ($550.00 per day for the two of us in 2011) will enhance your experience immeasurably as well as cut times in lines and is a far more personal.
The going rate for a guide is now $750+ a day. Guides in Israel are very well trained and people on travel forms seem to generally have good experiences with them, but that's still a ton of money. Getting a guide to cut times in lines sounds like a silly reason to get a guide, though. The only things in Israel where there will be a line of any sort are things like inside the Holy Sepulchre to visit the supposed Jesus tomb and inside the Church of the Nativity to visit the site of Jesus' supposed birth. Anyone with "chutzpah" can cut the line; guides don't have any special privileges that you can't do yourself.

In Jerusalem see the Church of the Holy Sepulchre were you can touch the slab Jesus was laid on after the crucifixion. also visit the Spanish steps and the western wall.
Spanish steps are in Rome. You may mean the Southern Steps, which are near the Western Wall and within the excavations at the "Jerusalem Archaeological Park."

By the way, jacketwatch, I'm not sure it's particularly necessary for you to clog up OP's thread and make several posts with your generic pictures of common sites in Israel. Anyone can go onto Google and find tens of thousands of photos of Masada, the Dead Sea, and the spot of Jesus' birth. OP didn't ask anything in particular that would necessitate you posting these photos. Essentially, you're hijacking the thread. Perhaps you ought to think what your photos are contributing to this thread.
LAX_Esq is online now  
Dec 1st, 2019, 01:43 AM
  #11  
 
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Originally Posted by LAX_Esq View Post
OP, are you affiliated with -- or interested in -- any particular religion? The reason I ask is because, if you are, that will help focus your trip. With 10 days (actually less, if you're going to Petra), there is so much to see in Israel that you can't even crack the surface of it.

In general, a good 10 day trip to Israel would be flying into TLV airport, renting a car from there, heading directly to the North for 2-3 days (lots of different options for places to stay and things to do in the North), heading back to Tel Aviv and dropping off the car, staying in Tel Aviv for a night or two, and then heading over to Jerusalem for as much time as you have. From Jerusalem, you should do a day trip to Masada and TLV. You don't want or need a car in Jerusalem or Tel Aviv.

Instead of doing a Petra round trip from Israel, consider just going one way to Petra and then flying home from Amman. There is other cool stuff in Jordan, but in 10 days, you don't have much time.

As far as when to go, you should anytime near/around the major Jewish holidays, particularly Passover/Pesach in the Spring and Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur and Sukkot in the Fall. Things are really expensive because it is a common time for travel, and there a lot of closures on the religious holidays. You can find the 2021 holiday schedule here: https://www.hebcal.com/holidays/2021




Only Muslims can go inside the Dome of the Rock and inside the Al Aqsa Mosque. Non-Muslims can visit the Temple Mount in theory, but visiting hours are very limited and subject to change/closure due to random security issues. OP should hope to visit it, but not be disappointed if it doesn't work out.



The going rate for a guide is now $750+ a day. Guides in Israel are very well trained and people on travel forms seem to generally have good experiences with them, but that's still a ton of money. Getting a guide to cut times in lines sounds like a silly reason to get a guide, though. The only things in Israel where there will be a line of any sort are things like inside the Holy Sepulchre to visit the supposed Jesus tomb and inside the Church of the Nativity to visit the site of Jesus' supposed birth. Anyone with "chutzpah" can cut the line; guides don't have any special privileges that you can't do yourself.



Spanish steps are in Rome. You may mean the Southern Steps, which are near the Western Wall and within the excavations at the "Jerusalem Archaeological Park."

By the way, jacketwatch, I'm not sure it's particularly necessary for you to clog up OP's thread and make several posts with your generic pictures of common sites in Israel. Anyone can go onto Google and find tens of thousands of photos of Masada, the Dead Sea, and the spot of Jesus' birth. OP didn't ask anything in particular that would necessitate you posting these photos. Essentially, you're hijacking the thread. Perhaps you ought to think what your photos are contributing to this thread.
Thats you opinion. The OP may also like it as may others so I actually did. Posting pictures of where the OP wants to go is hardly hijacking a thread. It happens all the time on Fodors. Now if I posted pictures of say Maui that would be different. You failed to see it that and that another member posted links to edify the the pictures. It’s not all about you.
I meant the old quarter in Jerusalem, not the Spanish steps so thank you for that and the info about the Dome of the Rock and the current price for private guides.
And private guides in Bethlehem do have special privileges. There are two different lines.
Shalom.

Last edited by jacketwatch; Dec 1st, 2019 at 02:14 AM.
jacketwatch is offline  
Dec 1st, 2019, 07:57 AM
  #12  
 
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Some notes on timing. In 2021 Passover falls early (end of March, beginning of April) and the High Holidays run from September 19 through early October (Sukkot is Oct. 3.) Things can get very pricey at those times, so unless you want to be there for those holidays, it would be best to time your trip around them.

Heat is indeed a factor; as stated by May things can get very warm, and even into October it can still be warm, but things cool off fast. And one can't speak in broad terms; even in such a small country the variance can be noticeable - Jerusalem is at a higher elevation than the coast and can be considerably cooler (and less humid) than Tel Aviv. The Negev and Red Sea are seldom cool, while the Galilee is truly the land of milk and honey in the spring and autumn.

I would probably look for a one or two day tour of Petra from Jeruaslem or Tel Aviv rather than driving to Eilat or some such. The one-day tours tend to leave at OMG o'clock and return late; the two day ones are more civilized and typically stop in other historic sites in Israel or Jordan en route to or from Petra. However, with just ten days I might be tempted to put together an itinerary that skips Petra just as a thought experiment. Remember that if you're coming from the US you're into a major time change and risk of jetlag, if that's an issue.

I don't have any hotel recommendations for Jerusalem; we usually stay across the street from the King David at the YMCA Three Arches hotel (called the "yimka") which is historic but not as fancy. The new Waldorf-Astoria near the Old City is getting lots of raves, but is probably quite pricey. The one hotel I would recommend wholeheartedly is the Scots Hotel in Tiberias on Lake Kinneret, aka the Sea of Galilee. It's beautiful, historic, has a terrific (non-Kosher if that matters) restaurant, as well as a nice wee pub. https://www.scotshotels.com/

With just ten days you're going to have to set priorities. I'd basically recommend three bases, in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, and in the Galilee. If you want to include Masada, the Dead Sea or Eilat/Petra, you'll need to make time for long-ish drives.

Tel Aviv is the cultural heart of the country - it's a vibrant, busy place with terrific restaurants, markets, walking neighborhoods and, in Jaffa, it's own deep history. Jerusalem is... well, it will change your life. And the Galilee is so drop-dead gorgeous, with ancient and modern history all around you, wine from the Golan, religious sites ranging from early Safed to numerous Christian locations, the first kibbutz... a few days with a car in the Galilee is a fantastic experience.

Do your homework and try not to over-schedule yourselves. Make time for places like the Israel Museum and Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, the Museum of the Jewish People (formerly Museum of the Diaspora) in Tel Aviv. Walk around the historic Neve Tzedek district in Tel Aviv (part of the "white city" UNESCO World Heritage zone) and have shakshuka at Dr. Shakshuka in Jaffa. Visit historic and beautiful Rosh Pina in the Galilee, explore the old souk in Akko (en route to the Galilee.) And start planning your return visit.
Gardyloo is offline  
Dec 1st, 2019, 08:17 AM
  #13  
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Thanks -- good information. Based on your postings: we are Christian so are interested in those sights but also interested in the regional culture and other major attractions; interested in having an Israeli beer or two AND regional reds; and interested in great local cuisine - not exactly local, but Katz Deli in NYC is one of my favorite restaurants. Have looked up Jewish holidays for 2021 and looks like if we come mid March will avoid. Trying to keep Sabbath to one because of closures. Looks like flying into Israel and returning from Jordan is the most efficient. Please see my questions in all CAPS below. Tear this VERY rough itinerary to shreds.
Day 1 leave from Houston on Turkish Airlines about 10pm (Turkish business class looks comfortable so should be able to get some decent sleep - plus Ambien always helps)Day 2 arrive TLV about 10pm next night - rent car and drive up to Sea of Galilee. HOW LONG IS THE DRIVE TO TIBERIAS?DECENT ROADS? (Stay Rimonim Galei Kinnerth Hotel in Tiberius) HOTEL DECENT CHOICE?
Day 3 1stfull day -- Nazareth, Golan Heights, Sea of Galilee, etc.
Day 4 2nd full day -- continue with sightseeing

Day 5 drive to Jerusalem and turn in rental car (stay King David Hotel). CAN YOU RECOMMEND A AUTO RENTAL COMPANY THAT WOULD BE CONVENIENT TO RENT AT AIRPORT AND RETURN AT/NEAR KING DAVID?

Day 6 Jerusalem

Day 7 Jerusalem / Bethlehem

Day 8 drive to Dead Sea (stay Daniel Dead Sea Hotel in Ein Bokek). HOTEL GOOD CHOICE? BEST WAY TO GET FROM JERUSALEM TO EIN BOKEK?Day 9 Dead Sea and Masada. TAKE TAXIS?
Day 10 drive / taxi Petra. CAN YOU RENT A CAR AT ISRAELI/JORDAN BORDER AND RETURN AT THE AIRPORT IN AMMAN? ROADS? BETTER CHOICES? (stay Petra Bubble Luxotel in Wadi Musa)
Day 11 Petra then drive late to Amman airport (stay at Amman Airport Hotel). OPTIONS ON HOW TO GET FROM PETRA TO AMMAN? TAXI?
Day 12 return home via Turkish Airlines Amman/ISH/IAH (5 hours layover in Istanbul -- SO DOES IT MAKE SENSE TO TAKE A TAXI JUST TO SEE THE CITY?)

CAN YOU SEE AN EASY WAY TO ELIMINATE A DAY? ARE WE TRYING TO DO TOO MUCH? ANY PASSPORT ISSUES IN TRAVELING BETWEEN ISRAEL AND JORDAN?
Philip is offline  
Dec 1st, 2019, 08:21 AM
  #14  
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Sorry GARDYLOO -- I was posting at the same time as you were. Thanks for additional excellent information.
Philip is offline  
Dec 1st, 2019, 08:28 AM
  #15  
 
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There doesn't seem to be any issues traveling to Jordan from Israel with a US passport.
You apparently need a Jordanian visa but that is obtainable at the border.
https://traveltips.usatoday.com/trav...ael-36052.html
Also be careful about handwashing. Many touch sacred artifacts like for example the slab in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and I saw one man kiss it. Be careful, bring a hand sanitizer.
All the best.
Larry

Last edited by jacketwatch; Dec 1st, 2019 at 09:12 AM.
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Dec 1st, 2019, 11:22 AM
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Of course your trip is a long way off, and it is, after all, YOUR trip, but here's an imaginary timeline and route for you to consider. As you well know, there are umpteen alternative plans, all reasonable, but this one might hold your interest.

Map - https://goo.gl/maps/6cgCLj1amktEJEo59

Plan -

Land at Ben Gurion and take a sherut (shared taxi/minivan) to your hotel in Jerusalem. Spend four nights (or three - see below) in Jerusalem, including day trips to Bethelem, a day or overnight trip to Petra (hence the 3 v. 4 nights in Jerusalem) and in general exploring the city.

Get a car (there are several agencies right on King David Street near the hotels) and drive to Ein Gedi or near Masada on the Dead Sea. Spend a night there; visiting Masada is best in the morning or late afternoon.

Then drive up the Jordan Valley on Hwy 90 to the Galilee. Note while this passes through the West Bank, it's a safe and convenient road; however you won't be able to enter the communities under PA control, mainly Jericho.

Spend three nights based in Tiberias, doing day trips to the Golan, Rosh Pinna, maybe up to Rosh HaNikra on the ocean near the Lebanese border, whatever. You can include Nazareth as one of the day trips, or save it until the day you leave.

Drive to Tel Aviv, possibly via Nazareth, drop the car and spend the rest of your time in Tel Aviv. Then taxi or sherut to the airport, and off to home.

Driving in both Jerusalem and Tel Aviv can be stressful due to numerous narrow, one-way streets and a general "Mediterranean" driving style. Taxis and shoe leather are easier on your brain.

March 2021 is way too far out there to look at plane fares or schedules, but for this coming March I'd look at British Airways to/from TLV. They have a mid-day departure from Houston that connects quickly at Heathrow and which delivers you to TLV in the late afternoon, rather than most flights which arrive in the wee hours. The ridiculous arrival and departure hours at Ben Gurion are notorious for leaving Americans seriously jetlagged; I'd look very carefully at the specific times.

Last edited by Gardyloo; Dec 1st, 2019 at 11:24 AM.
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Dec 1st, 2019, 11:53 AM
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OP, looking over your itinerary in post #13, I have the following comments / answers to your Q's:

- It's about a 1.5 hour drive from TLV airport to Tiberias. All roads in israel are modern and well marked in English, and there won't be traffic at 10pm. (Israeli drivers are very aggressive, so be forewarned.)

- You have very little time in Jerusalem. It's doable, though. I'd plan the full day (Day 6) for the Old City. And use the other partial days for

- You're skipping Tel Aviv in its entirety. It's ultimately choice and reasonable people could go either way on this give your limited time. There isn't so much historical there beyond Old Jaffa, but IMO it's fairly important/interesting to see what the largest, modern city is like in the world's only Jewish state.

- If you were planning to rent a * second * car in Jerusalem to go to the Dead Sea, consider going from the North directly to the Dead Sea using the rental car, before you go to Jerusalem. And then loop back to Jerusalem from the Dead Sea. That way, you won't have to rent a car twice.

- You cannot drive a rental car between Israel and Jordan (without a gargantuan hassle and paperwork, if it can even be done). You could have a taxi / private driver take you from Jerusalem to the Allenby Bridge. There is even a shared taxi that departs from the Damascus Gate of the Old City, but with a group of 6, you might be better off arranging a private driver.

- Backing up a step, which border were you even planning to use? VERY IMPORTANT NOTE: You can't get a Jordanian visa at the Allenby Bridge, and you'd have to get one in advance your home country. Therefore, consider switching the entire order of the trip and doing Jordan first and entering Israel from the Allenby Bridge. Jordanian visas are on arrival at AMM airport and at all border points except the Allenby Bridge; there are silly political reasons for this (having to do with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict) that are beyond the scope of this forum.

- Private drivers in Jordan are really cheap, and I'd just take one there rather than waste time and hassle with car rentals in Jordan.

- Your 12 days includes what is 3+ in travel days just getting to the Middle East and back. I'd seriously think about scrapping the Jordan thing in its entirety. I know the temptation to see Petra and get your money's worth while you're there, but it'll be a lot of running around. Or try to make the trip into a full two weeks.

- Re Katz Deli in NYC, you'd have to look very, very hard in Israel to find what we in America would call a "traditional Jewish deli." Don't expect to find pastrami or corned beef on rye, lox and cream cheese on a bagel, etc. There was one such place in Jerusalem some years ago that was awful, and it probably isn't around anymore. Food in Israel will be amazing in any city, and I wouldn't even waste time tracking down someone's recommendation for the best falafel place or the best hummus place or the best shawarma place. It's will all be really good.

- Gardyloo's post is great, and s/he and I are on the same page on pretty much everything. Among his recs for the North, since you're Christian and probably want to focus on in the Christian sites in the North, I'd probably skip Rosh Pina and Safed/Tzfat. Those have more significance/meaning to Jews and probably aren't as generally important, and there is so much else to see in the North. Acre/Akko is great.

- The only "passport issue" is that Jordan *may* stamp your passport at the land borders. This basically tells any Arab country that you've been to Israel, and will mean you'd have to get a new passport / second 2 year validity US passport if you plan to travel to certain of Israel's arch-enemies in the near future. I've read Jordan might not be stamping at land borders anymore, but you'll need to research this yourself if you care. Israel no longer stamps passports at the land borders.

Originally Posted by jacketwatch View Post

Thats you opinion. The OP may also like it as may others so I actually did. Posting pictures of where the OP wants to go is hardly hijacking a thread. It happens all the time on Fodors. Now if I posted pictures of say Maui that would be different. You failed to see it that and that another member posted links to edify the the pictures. It’s not all about you.
I meant the old quarter in Jerusalem, not the Spanish steps so thank you for that and the info about the Dome of the Rock and the current price for private guides.
And private guides in Bethlehem do have special privileges. There are two different lines.
Shalom.
If you have a little bit of "chutzpah," you can simply go right up to the entrance (or the exit) of the grotto inside the Church of the Nativity and they'll let you right in if you're a few people or less.

The OP made no mention of any of the sites for which you posted pictures (i.e., Yad Vashem, Dead Sea, Masada, and the Church of the Nativity). And the OP didn't ask for your stock photos of these sites, or any photos at all from anyone. OP seems well traveled and seems to be a good planner/researcher, and I'm sure that he can easily find a photo of the Dead Sea on his own without your help. On the other hand, if OP, for example, was a big hiker and specifically asked about off the beaten path hikes that only a local or someone with intimate familiarity with the Israeli hiking scene would know about (e.g., the Nahal Zaki hike), then photos of some off the beaten path hikes you took might have added to the thread.
LAX_Esq is online now  
Dec 1st, 2019, 12:29 PM
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LAX you’ve voiced your opinion and I voiced mine.
Move on. Im here to have fun and not argue.
Goodbye and good luck. The end.




Last edited by jacketwatch; Dec 1st, 2019 at 12:50 PM.
jacketwatch is offline  
Dec 7th, 2019, 11:37 AM
  #19  
 
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Thanks for posting the pictures jacketwatch.

Having just returned from Israel and Jordan, it was nice to see places I just saw.
Percy is offline  
Dec 7th, 2019, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Percy View Post
Thanks for posting the pictures jacketwatch.

Having just returned from Israel and Jordan, it was nice to see places I just saw.
Percy - might you post a trip report? We are headed to Jordan in February!
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