Mt. Rushmore and the Black Hills

The 2 million acres of the Black Hills are about evenly split between private property and the Black Hills National Forest. Fortunately for visitors, the national forest is one of the most developed in the United States. Roads are numerous and generally well maintained, and navigation is easy. Towns with services are plentiful (compared with the Wyoming plains to the west), so you needn't worry about how much gas you've got in your tank or where you'll find a place to stay at night. Rapid City, the largest community in the region, is the most popular base for exploring the Black Hills. The northern towns of Deadwood and Spearfish have almost as many services, with less traffic and fewer tourists.

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  • 1. Beautiful Rushmore Cave

    Cave

    Stalagmites, stalactites, flowstone, ribbons, columns, helictites, and the "Big Room" are all part of the worthwhile tour into this cave. In...Read More

  • 2. Black Hills Caverns

    Cave

    Amethysts, logomites, calcite crystals, and other specimens fill this cave, first discovered by gold-seekers in 1882. Half-hour and hour tours...Read More

  • 3. Jewel Cave National Monument

    Cave

    Even though its more than 177 miles of surveyed passages make this cave the world's third largest (Kentucky's Mammoth Cave is the longest),...Read More

  • 4. Sitting Bull Crystal Caverns

    Cave

    Crystalline chambers, reflecting pools, and limestone fill these underground caverns, named in honor of Sioux holy man Sitting Bull. Check out...Read More

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