Palm Beach and the Treasure Coast

We’ve compiled the best of the best in Palm Beach and the Treasure Coast - browse our top choices for the top things to see or do during your stay.

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  • 1. Blowing Rocks Preserve

    Managed by the Nature Conservancy, this protected area on Jupiter Island is headlined by an almost otherworldly looking limestone shelf that fringes South Florida's most...

    Managed by the Nature Conservancy, this protected area on Jupiter Island is headlined by an almost otherworldly looking limestone shelf that fringes South Florida's most turquoise waters. Also protected within its 73 acres are plants native to beachfront dunes, coastal strand (the landward side of the dunes), mangrove swamps, and tropical hardwood forests. There are two short walking trails on the Intracoastal side of the preserve, as well as an education center and a butterfly garden. The best time to come and see the "blowing rocks" is when a storm is brewing: if high tides and strong offshore winds coincide, the sea blows spectacularly through the holes in the eroded outcropping. During a calm summer day, you can swim in crystal clear waters on the mile-long beach and climb around the rock formations at low tide. Park in one of the two lots, because police ticket cars on the road.

    574 S. Beach Rd., Hobe Sound, Florida, 33455, USA
    561-744–6668

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $2, Daily 9–4:30
  • 2. Delray Municipal Beach

    If you're looking for a place to see and be seen, head for this wide expanse of sand, the heart of which is where Atlantic...

    If you're looking for a place to see and be seen, head for this wide expanse of sand, the heart of which is where Atlantic Avenue meets A1A, close to restaurants, bars, and quick-serve eateries. Singles, families, and water-sports enthusiasts alike love it here. Lounge chairs and umbrellas can be rented every day, and lifeguards man stations half a mile out in each direction. The most popular section of beach is south of Atlantic Avenue on A1A, where the street parking is found. There are also two metered lots with restrooms across from A1A at Sandoway Park and Anchor Park (bring quarters if parking here). On the beach by Anchor Park, north of Casuarina Road, are six volleyball nets and a kiosk that offers Hobie Wave rentals, surfing lessons, and snorkeling excursions to the 1903 SS Inchulva shipwreck half a mile offshore. The beach itself is open 24 hours, if you're at a nearby hotel and fancy a moonlight stroll. Amenities: food and drink; lifeguards; parking (fee); showers; toilets; water sports. Best for: partiers; swimming; windsurfing.

    Rte. A1A and E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida, 33483, USA

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $2 per 1 hr parking, Daily 24 hrs.
  • 3. Henry Morrison Flagler Museum

    The worldly sophistication of Florida's Gilded Age lives on at Whitehall, the plush 55-room "marble palace" Henry Flagler commissioned in 1901 for his third wife,...

    The worldly sophistication of Florida's Gilded Age lives on at Whitehall, the plush 55-room "marble palace" Henry Flagler commissioned in 1901 for his third wife, Mary Lily Kenan. Architects John Carrère and Thomas Hastings were instructed to create the finest home imaginable—and they outdid themselves. Whitehall rivals the grandeur of European palaces and has an entrance hall with a baroque ceiling similar to Louis XIV's Versailles. Here you'll see original furnishings; a hidden staircase Flagler used to sneak from his bedroom to the billiards room; an art collection; a 1,200-pipe organ; and Florida East Coast Railway exhibits, along with Flagler's personal railcar, No. 91, showcased in an 8,000-square-foot Beaux Arts–style pavilion behind the mansion. Docent-led tours and audio tours are included with admission. The museum's Café des Beaux-Arts, open from Thanksgiving through mid-April, offers a Gilded Age–style early afternoon tea for $40 (11:30 am–2:30 pm); the price includes museum admission.

    1 Whitehall Way, Palm Beach, Florida, 33480, USA
    561-655–2833

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $18, Tues.–Sat. 10–5, Sun. noon–5
  • 4. John D. MacArthur Beach State Park

    If getting far from rowdy crowds is your goal, this spot on the north end of Singer Island is a good choice. Encompassing 2 miles...

    If getting far from rowdy crowds is your goal, this spot on the north end of Singer Island is a good choice. Encompassing 2 miles of beach and a lush subtropical coastal habitat, inside you'll find a great place for kayaking, snorkeling at natural reefs, bird-watching, fishing, and hiking. You might even get to see a few manatees. A 4,000-square-foot nature center has aquariums and displays on local flora and fauna, and there's a long roster of monthly activities, such as surfing clinics, art lessons, and live bluegrass music. Guided sea turtle walks are available at night in season, and daily nature walks depart at 10 am. Check the website for times and costs of activities. Amenities: parking (fee); showers; toilets; water sports. Best for: solitude; surfing; swimming; walking.

    10900 Jack Nicklaus Dr., North Palm Beach, Florida, 33408, USA
    561-624–6950

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Parking $5, bicyclists and pedestrians $2, Park daily 8–sunset; nature center and gift shop daily 9–5
  • 5. Jonathan Dickinson State Park

    This serene state park provides a glimpse of predevelopment "real" Florida. A beautiful showcase of Florida inland habitat, the park teems with endangered gopher tortoises...

    This serene state park provides a glimpse of predevelopment "real" Florida. A beautiful showcase of Florida inland habitat, the park teems with endangered gopher tortoises and manatees. From Hobe Mountain, an ancient dune topped with a tower, you are treated to a panoramic view of this park's more than 11,000 acres of varied terrain and the Intracoastal Waterway. The Loxahatchee River, named a National Wild and Scenic River, cuts through the park, and is home to plenty of charismatic manatees in winter and alligators year-round. Two-hour boat tours of the river depart daily. Kayak rentals are available, as is horseback riding (it was reintroduced after a 30-year absence). Among the amenities are a dozen newly redone cabins for rent, tent sites, bicycle and hiking trails, two established campgrounds and some primitive campgrounds, and a snack bar. Palmettos on the Loxahatchee is a new food-and-beverage garden with wine, beer, and local foods featured. Don't skip the Elsa Kimbell Environmental Education and Research Center, which has interactive displays, exhibits, and a short film on the natural history of the area. The park is also a fantastic birding location, with about 150 species to spot.

    16450 S.E. U.S. 1, Hobe Sound, Florida, 33455, USA
    772-546–2771

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Vehicles $6, bicyclists and pedestrians $2, Daily 8–sunset; Elsa Kimbell Environmental Education and Research Center daily 9–5
  • 6. Jupiter Beach

    Famous throughout all of Florida for a unique pooch-loving stance, the town of Jupiter's beach welcomes Yorkies, Labs, pugs—you name it—along its 2½-mile oceanfront. Dogs...

    Famous throughout all of Florida for a unique pooch-loving stance, the town of Jupiter's beach welcomes Yorkies, Labs, pugs—you name it—along its 2½-mile oceanfront. Dogs can frolic unleashed (once they're on the beach) or join you for a dip. Free parking spots line A1A in front of the sandy stretch, and there are multiple access points and continuously refilled dog-bag boxes (29 to be exact). The dog beach starts on Marcinski Road (Beach Marker No. 25) and continues north until Beach Marker No. 59. Before going, read through the guidelines posted on the Friends of Jupiter Beach website; the biggest things to note are be sure to clean up after your dog and steer clear of lifeguarded areas to the north and south. Dogs fare best early morning and late afternoon, when the sand isn't too hot for their paws.Amenities: showers; toilets. Best for: walking.

    2188 Marcinski Rd., Jupiter, Florida, 33477, USA
    561-748–8140
  • 7. Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum

    Designed by Civil War hero Lieutenant George Gordon Meade, this working brick lighthouse has been under the Coast Guard's purview since 1860. Tours of the...

    Designed by Civil War hero Lieutenant George Gordon Meade, this working brick lighthouse has been under the Coast Guard's purview since 1860. Tours of the 108-foot-tall landmark are held approximately every half hour and are included with admission. (Children must be at least 4 feet tall to go to the top.) The museum tells about efforts to restore this graceful spire to the way it looked from 1860 to 1918; its galleries and outdoor structures, including a pioneer home, also showcase local history dating back 5,000 years.

    500 Capt. Armour's Way, Jupiter, Florida, 33469, USA
    561-747–8380

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $12, Closed Mon. and Tues., Jan.--Apr., daily 10--5; May--Dec., Tues.--Sun. 10--5 (last tour at 4)
  • 8. Loggerhead Park Marine Life Center of Juno Beach

    Located in a certified green building in Loggerhead Park—and established by Eleanor N. Fletcher, the "turtle lady of Juno Beach"—the center focuses on the conservation...

    Located in a certified green building in Loggerhead Park—and established by Eleanor N. Fletcher, the "turtle lady of Juno Beach"—the center focuses on the conservation of sea turtles, using education, research, and rehabilitation. The education center houses displays of coastal natural history, detailing Florida's marine ecosystems and the life and plight of the various species of sea turtles found on Florida's shores. You can visit recovering turtles in their outdoor hospital tanks; volunteers are happy to tell you the turtles' heroic tales of survival. The center has regularly scheduled activities, such as Kid's Story Time and Junior Vet Lab, and most are free of charge. During peak nesting season, the center hosts night walks to experience turtle nesting in action. Given that the adjacent beach is part of the second-biggest nesting ground for loggerhead turtles in the world, your chances of seeing this natural phenomenon are pretty high (over 15,000 loggerheads nested here during one recent season).

    14200 U.S. 1, Juno Beach, Florida, 33408, USA
    561-627–8280

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free, Mon.–Sat. 10–5, Sun. 11–5
  • 9. Manatee Lagoon

    Once a casual spot next to the local electric plant's discharge waters, this center celebrating the manatee—South Florida's popular winter visitors—opened at a spot where...

    Once a casual spot next to the local electric plant's discharge waters, this center celebrating the manatee—South Florida's popular winter visitors—opened at a spot where the peaceful creatures naturally congregate. The airy, two-story facility is surrounded by wraparound decks to accommodate sea-cow spotters from fall to spring. Educational, interactive displays tell the story of this once-endangered species. A long deck along the seawall leads to picnic pavilions from where you can watch the action at nearby Peanut Island and the Port of Palm Beach. Free admission makes it group-friendly; a live "manatee cam" shows manatee counts before you go. The center offers weekend art classes for children but requires advance registration; check their calendar for details.

    6000 N. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach, Florida, 33407, USA
    561-626--2833

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free, Closed Mon., Tues.--Sun. 9--4
  • 10. McKee Botanical Garden

    On the National Register of Historic Places, the 18-acre plot is a tropical jungle garden—one of the most lush and serene around. This is the...

    On the National Register of Historic Places, the 18-acre plot is a tropical jungle garden—one of the most lush and serene around. This is the place to see spectacular water lilies, and the property's original 1932 Hall of Giants, a rustic wooden structure that has stained-glass and bronze bells, contains what is claimed to be the world's largest single-plank mahogany table at 35 feet long. There's a Seminole bamboo pavilion, a gift shop, and café (open for lunch Tuesday through Saturday, and Sunday in season), which serves especially tasty snacks and sandwiches.

    350 U.S. 1, Vero Beach, Florida, 32962, USA
    772-794–0601

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $15, Closed Mon., Tues.–Sat. 10–5, Sun. noon–5
  • 11. Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

    The boonies west of Delray Beach seems an odd place to encounter one of the region's most important cultural centers, but this is exactly where...

    The boonies west of Delray Beach seems an odd place to encounter one of the region's most important cultural centers, but this is exactly where you can find a 200-acre cultural and recreational facility heralding the Yamato Colony of Japanese farmers that settled here in the early 20th century. A permanent exhibit details their history, and all together the museum's collection has more than 7,000 artifacts and works of art on rotating display. Traditional tea ceremonies are conducted monthly from October to June, along with educational classes on topics like calligraphy and sushi making (these require advance registration and come with a fee). The six main gardens are inspired by famous historic periods in Japanese garden design and have South Florida accents (think tropical bonsai), and the on-site Cornell Café serves light Asian fare at affordable prices and was recognized by the Food Network as being one of the country's best museum eateries.

    4000 Morikami Park Rd., Delray Beach, Florida, 33446, USA
    561-495–0233

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $15, Closed Mon., Tues.–Sun. 10–5
  • 12. Norton Museum of Art

    The museum (constructed in 1941 by steel magnate Ralph H. Norton and his wife, Elizabeth) has grown to become one of the most impressive in...

    The museum (constructed in 1941 by steel magnate Ralph H. Norton and his wife, Elizabeth) has grown to become one of the most impressive in South Florida with an extensive collection of 19th- and 20th-century American and European paintings—including works by Picasso, Monet, Matisse, Pollock, Cassatt, and O'Keeffe—plus Chinese art, earlier European art, and photography. To accommodate the growing collection, the museum recently expanded to include 12,000 additional square feet of gallery space in a new west wing, event spaces, a garden, and a great hall. The popular Art After Dark, Thursday from 5 to 9 pm, is a gathering spot for art lovers, with wine and music in the galleries.

    1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach, Florida, 33401, USA
    561-832–5196

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free, Closed Mon, Tues.--Sun. noon--5
  • 13. Sebastian Inlet State Park

    The 1,000-acre park, which runs from the tip of Orchid Island across the passage to the barrier island just north, is one of the Florida...

    The 1,000-acre park, which runs from the tip of Orchid Island across the passage to the barrier island just north, is one of the Florida park system's biggest draws, especially because of the inlet's highly productive fishing waters. Views from either side of the tall bridge are spectacular, and a unique hallmark is that the gates never close—an amazing feature for die-hard anglers who know snook bite better at night. Two jetties are usually packed with fishers and spectators alike. The park has two entrances, the entrance in Vero Beach and the main entrance in Melbourne (9700 Rte. A1A). Within its grounds, you'll discover a wonderful two-story restaurant that overlooks the ocean, a fish and surfing shop (by the way, this place has some of the best waves in the state, but there are also calmer zones for relaxing swims), two museums, guided sea turtle walks in season, 51 campsites with water and electricity, and a marina with powerboat, kayak, and canoe rentals. Amenities: food and drink; parking (fee); showers; toilets; water sports. Best for: sunrise; sunset; surfing; walking.

    14251 N. Rte. A1A, Vero Beach, Florida, 32963, USA
    321-984–4852

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $8, Daily 24 hrs (gates never close)
  • 14. The Breakers

    Built by Henry Flagler in 1896 and rebuilt by his descendants after a 1925 fire, this magnificent Italian Renaissance–style resort helped launch Florida tourism with...

    Built by Henry Flagler in 1896 and rebuilt by his descendants after a 1925 fire, this magnificent Italian Renaissance–style resort helped launch Florida tourism with its Gilded Age opulence, attracting influential wealthy Northerners to the state. The hotel, still owned by Flagler's heirs, is a must-see even if you aren't staying here. Walk through the 200-foot-long lobby, which has soaring arched ceilings painted by 72 Italian artisans and hung with crystal chandeliers. Meet for a drink and a round of eclectic small plates at the HMF, one of the most beautiful bars in the state. Book a pampering spa treatment or dine at the popular oceanfront Seafood Bar. The $30 parking fee is waived if you spend at least $30 anywhere in the hotel (just have your ticket validated).

    1 S. County Rd., Palm Beach, Florida, 33480, USA
    561-655–6611
  • 15. Worth Avenue

    Called the Avenue by Palm Beachers, this half-mile-long street is synonymous with exclusive shopping. Nostalgia lovers recall an era when faces or names served as...

    Called the Avenue by Palm Beachers, this half-mile-long street is synonymous with exclusive shopping. Nostalgia lovers recall an era when faces or names served as charge cards, purchases were delivered home before customers returned from lunch, and bills were sent directly to private accountants. Times have changed, but a stroll amid the Spanish-accented buildings, many designed by Addison Mizner, offers a tantalizing taste of the island's ongoing commitment to elegant consumerism. Explore the labyrinth of nine pedestrian "vias" off each side that wind past boutiques, tiny plazas, bubbling fountains, and bougainvillea-festooned balconies; this is where the smaller, unique shops are. The Worth Avenue Association holds historic walking tours on Wednesday at 11 am during "the season" (December through April). The $10 fee benefits local nonprofit organizations.

    Worth Ave., Palm Beach, Florida, 33480, USA
    561-659–6909
  • 16. A.E. Backus Museum & Gallery

    Works by one of Florida's foremost landscape artists and leader of The Highwaymen artist group, Albert Ernest Backus (1906–90), are on display at this museum....

    Works by one of Florida's foremost landscape artists and leader of The Highwaymen artist group, Albert Ernest Backus (1906–90), are on display at this museum. It also mounts changing exhibits and offers exceptional buys on paintings, pottery, and jewelry by local artists.

    500 N. Indian River Dr., Fort Pierce, Florida, 34950, USA
    772-465–0630

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $2, Closed Mon. and Tues., Oct.–June, Wed.–Sat. 10–4, Sun. noon–4; summer by appointment only
  • 17. Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

    This landmarked complex is a testament to the creative genius of the late American sculptor Ann Weaver Norton (1905–82), who was the second wife of...

    This landmarked complex is a testament to the creative genius of the late American sculptor Ann Weaver Norton (1905–82), who was the second wife of Norton Museum founder, industrialist Ralph H. Norton. A set of art galleries in the studio and main house where she lived is surrounded by 2 acres of gardens with 300 species of rare palm trees, eight brick megaliths, a monumental figure in Norwegian granite, and plantings designed to attract native birds.

    253 Barcelona Rd., West Palm Beach, Florida, 33401, USA
    561-832–5328

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $10, Closed Mon. and Tues., Wed.–Sun. 10–4.
  • 18. Armory Art Center

    Built by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in 1939, this art deco facility is now a nonprofit art school hosting rotating exhibitions and art classes...

    Built by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) in 1939, this art deco facility is now a nonprofit art school hosting rotating exhibitions and art classes throughout the year. The Armory Art Center became an institution for art instruction when the Norton Museum Gallery and School of Art dropped the latter part of its name in 1986 and discontinued art-instruction classes.

    1700 Parker Ave., West Palm Beach, Florida, 33401, USA
    561-832–1776

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free, Weekdays 9–4:30, Sat. 9–4
  • 19. Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

    The most robust part of the northern Everglades, this 221-square-mile refuge is one of two huge water-retention areas accounting for much of the "River of...

    The most robust part of the northern Everglades, this 221-square-mile refuge is one of two huge water-retention areas accounting for much of the "River of Grass" outside the national park near Miami. Start at the visitor center, which has fantastic interactive exhibits and videos like Night Sounds of the Everglades and an airboat simulator. From there, you can take a marsh trail to a 20-foot-high observation tower, or stroll a half-mile boardwalk lined with educational signage through a dense cypress swamp. There are also guided nature walks (including some specifically for bird-watching), and there's great bass fishing (bring your own poles and bait) and a 5½-mile canoe and kayak trail loop (both can be rented from a kiosk by the fishing pier).

    10216 Lee Rd., Boynton Beach, Florida, 33473, USA
    561-734–8303

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $5 per vehicle; $1 per pedestrian or bicyclist, Daily 5 am–10 pm; visitor center daily 9–4
  • 20. Atlantic Dunes Park

    Quiet and green, this has the opposite vibe of the main beach a few miles up. What it also has are lush pine trees under...

    Quiet and green, this has the opposite vibe of the main beach a few miles up. What it also has are lush pine trees under which are picnic tables, nature trails through the dunes, and a boardwalk that takes you to the shore—in addition to restrooms and showers conveniently located on the ocean side of A1A (rather than across the street in the parking lot). Chair rentals are available, and as at the municipal beach, all lifeguards are certified EMTs. A surf wheelchair is on hand for first-come-first-served use with a limit of two hours per person. Amenities: lifeguards; parking (fee); toilets; showers. Best for: solitude; swimming; walking.

    1605 S. Ocean Blvd., Delray Beach, Florida, 33484, USA

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $2 per hr parking, Daily 8–sunset

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