Martinique Restaurants

Martinique cuisine, a fusion of African and French, is certainly more international and sophisticated than that of its immediate island neighbors. The influx of young chefs, who favor a contemporary and lighter approach, has brought exciting innovations to the table. This haute-nouvelle creole cuisine emphasizes local products, predominantly starchy tubers such as plantains, white yams, yuca, and island sweet potatoes, as well as vegetables such as breadfruit, christophene (also known as chayote), and taro leaves. Many creole dishes have been Frenchified, transformed into mousselines, terrines, and gratins topped with creamy sauces. And then there's the bountiful harvest of the sea—lambi (conch), langouste (clawless local lobsters), and dozens of species of fish predominate, but you can also find écrevisses (freshwater crayfish, which are as luscious as jumbo prawns).

Some local creole specialties are accras (cod or vegetable fritters), which are the signature appetizer of Martinique, crabes farcis (stuffed land crab), and feroce (avocado stuffed with saltfish and farina). You can perk up fish and any other dish with a hit of hot chien (dog) sauce. Not to worry—it's made from onions, shallots, hot peppers, oil, and vinegar. To cool your jets, have a ’ti punch—four parts white rum and one part sugarcane syrup.

Supermarkets often have snack bars that serve sandwiches, as do the bakeries and larger gas stations such as Esso and Total. Supermarkets, such as Carrefour, have good deli sections and sell French wines for significantly less than at home. Another French chain, Le Baguet Shop, has locations in most tourist areas. Travelers on a budget will find creperies and pizzerias, even an African pizza place in Le François. And there may be times when you just want to drive in to Mickey Ds—however, brace yourself for the price hike.

In Fort-de-France's city market, ladies serve up well-priced creole prix-fixe meals that can include accras, fricassee of octopus and conch, chicken in coconut milk, or grilled whole fish.

As for euro sticker shock, the consolation is that although menu prices may seem steep, they include tax and service. Prix-fixe menus, sometimes with wine, can help keep costs in line.

What to Wear. For dinner, casual resort wear is appropriate. Generally, men wear collared shirts. Women typically wear light cotton sundresses, short or long. At dinnertime, beach attire is too casual for most restaurants. Both the French (expats) ladies and the Martiniquais often "dress." They have an admirable French style, and almost always wear high heels.

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  • 1. Le Petibonum

    $$

    This marriage of French island funkiness and South Beach gloss is one-of-a-kind in Martinique. So is charismatic owner Guy Ferdinand, who has made this a...

    This marriage of French island funkiness and South Beach gloss is one-of-a-kind in Martinique. So is charismatic owner Guy Ferdinand, who has made this a destination restaurant in the north coast's tiny town of Carbet. Smack on the beach, it's an ideal stopover if you're visiting nearby St-Pierre. So remember to wear your swimsuit, kick off your shoes, and order the signature rum drink made with hibiscus and mint from the rum bar. You can lounge on one of the 60 coral rubber chaises, shaded by umbrellas, and be sprayed intermittently with a gentle, cool mist. The appetizers—blue marlin tartare or fried flying fish right from the Carbet shore—are delicious, as are main courses of fresh fish. There are lobster nights, and on Friday there are classical musicians. It's a mellow scene.

    Le Bord de Mer, Carbet, n/a Martinique, 97221, Martinique
    0596-78–04–34

    Known For

    • Chef/owner is a local celebrity
    • Signature jumbo crayfish in a vanilla sauce
    • Social scene
  • 2. Le Plein Soleil Restaurant

    $$$$

    Perennially popular with the chic set, Le Plein Soleil's restaurant has a smashing contemporary, Creole look, but it's the inventive, beautifully executed menu that cements...

    Perennially popular with the chic set, Le Plein Soleil's restaurant has a smashing contemporary, Creole look, but it's the inventive, beautifully executed menu that cements its well-deserved reputation. It continues to draw applause for the use of the latest techniques from France coupled with remarkable twists on local products. Take a long and leisurely lunch on the terrace, which has a hilltop sea view; by night the mood is romantic, the service fine, the music heady. An amuse bouche will arrive. A velouté can be the canvas for a ravioli made of foie gras or pineapple. For the evening's three-course prix-fixe dinner, you'll always have a choice of main courses, with at least one fresh, local fish. Roast pork with sweet potatoes and grilled vegetables with sesame oil is a good choice. Desserts are equally memorable.

    Le François, n/a Martinique, 97240, Martinique
    0596-38–07–77

    Known For

    • Sophisticated, trendy ambience
    • Sea views from the terrace
    • Fine dining

    Restaurant Details

    Rate Includes: No lunch Mon.–Thurs., Reservations essential
  • 3. Le Zandoli

    $$$$

    Although "le zandoli" is the Creole term for the lowly gecko, there's nothing humble about the culinary presentation or the wildly colorful dining room here,...

    Although "le zandoli" is the Creole term for the lowly gecko, there's nothing humble about the culinary presentation or the wildly colorful dining room here, which are as slick as anything you might encounter in Paris. Both the lunch and dinner chefs have worked in Michelin-starred restaurants in France. At the start of the meal, an amuse-bouche or two will whet your appetite. The three-course, prix-fixe menu is continually evolving, affected by seasonal market finds and influenced by five continents. Lunch is served from Thursday to Sunday. At night a gourmet tasting menu is available with a supplement for wine pairings. Desserts are exotic. One can opt for just two courses for a lower price. You may want to arrive for your dinner reservation early so that you can sit at the bar, which looks like an avant-garde movie set, and have a fanciful, fresh juice cocktail with tiny accoutrements. And in any given month there may be a reception and art exhibition, fashion show, or a gala party.

    rte. du Fort d'Alet, Les Trois-Îlets, n/a Martinique, 97229, Martinique
    0596-59–88–00

    Known For

    • Daily fish tartare
    • Sweetbreads of veal
    • A cream puff of the day

    Restaurant Details

    Rate Includes: No lunch Mon.--Wed., Reservations essential
  • 4. Batelière Beach Club (BBC)

    $$$

    At this thatch-roof beach bar, on any given day DJs might be spinning local and international sounds. The bar puts out strong (and pricey) tropical...

    At this thatch-roof beach bar, on any given day DJs might be spinning local and international sounds. The bar puts out strong (and pricey) tropical cocktails, though the food is less expensive than at the hotel's restaurant. Just plan not to be in a hurry, especially on the weekends. It attracts a mainly young crowd, and now, predominantly, a local one as well as guests from L'Hôtel La Batelière. With free parking and tight security because of the casino, it is a safe haven for tourists and one big party place.

    Fort-de-France, n/a Martinique, 97233, Martinique
    0596-10--64--26

    Known For

    • Live music or DJ
    • Trendy party atmosphere
    • Amazing view over the Batelière Beach
  • 5. Coup d’Coeur

    $

    If perusing the Poterie Village, look no farther for a lunch spot or a tea break. This patisserie–salon de thé is on the right, as...

    If perusing the Poterie Village, look no farther for a lunch spot or a tea break. This patisserie–salon de thé is on the right, as you first enter the village. In fact, you might make this your daytime go-to restaurant if you are staying in Trois Îlets. When you open the front door, the aromas of fresh baked goods will have you pressing your finger against the glass display case, euros clutched in your left hand, just like a little kid. Lunch can be a quiche (many varieties), pizza, or creative sandwich, and if you clean your plate then you can be rewarded with a Viennoiserie. Only French butter is used and all products are made in an artisanal manner. There's table seating but no waiter service.

    Les Trois-Îlets, n/a Martinique, 97229, Martinique
    0596-69–70–32

    Known For

    • Fresh baked goods
    • Daytime go-to
    • Quiche, pizza, sandwiches

    Restaurant Details

    Rate Includes: No dinner
  • Recommended Fodor’s Video

  • 6. La Baraqu' Obama

    $$$

    If you're looking for a seafront restaurant that specializes in conch and lobster, Obama’s is recommended. During lunchtime the alfresco terrace fills up mainly with...

    If you're looking for a seafront restaurant that specializes in conch and lobster, Obama’s is recommended. During lunchtime the alfresco terrace fills up mainly with French tourists supping on grilled lobster with either saltfish or black pudding or veggies, and a dessert. Aromas are drool-worthy with hints of lemon and melted butter. Main courses come with frites or rice, and some vegetables and greenery dressed with vinaigrette. There's plenty of Red Desperado (a local beer) and French rosé to wash it all down. The kitchen is across the street, as is the ice cream shop (with excellent tropical fruit flavors) and the Special Bar. Owner Patrick Henry put it together for his son who rocks it on weekends, with salsa on Friday nights. A 4-foot poster of Obama is the major work of art.

    bd. Kennedy, Ste-Luce, n/a Martinique, Martinique
    0696-80–78–75

    Known For

    • 4-foot poster of Obama
    • Lobster and conch
    • Grilled fresh catch of the day
  • 7. Le Brédas

    $$$$

    This culinary experience necessitates a trip into the island's interior, down winding roads where the dense foliage is junglelike. It's best navigated, at least the...

    This culinary experience necessitates a trip into the island's interior, down winding roads where the dense foliage is junglelike. It's best navigated, at least the first time, by day, so come for Sunday lunch. Martinican chef Jean-Charles Brédas is well known, having worked the better restaurants in Martinique and Manhattan. The tasteful decor includes taupe linen runners on long tables speckled with colored-glass bits; the ceramic plates are the creations of an esteemed local potter, Victor Anicet. The terrace dining room of this century-old house is covered by a peaked white awning. Bredas's mission is to preserve ancient saveurs (flavors), giving traditional island dishes and French classics a contemporary twist. If there aren't enough reservations for dinner, the restaurant will call all those who reserved to cancel. This is unlikely to happen on weekends, especially in winter season.

    Fort-de-France, n/a Martinique, 97212, Martinique
    0596-57–65–52

    Known For

    • Perfectly executed foie gras appetizer
    • Tender, marinated beef tenderloin
    • Contemporary, authentic Martinican cuisine

    Restaurant Details

    Rate Includes: Closed Mon.–Wed. No lunch Sat. No dinner Sun., Reservations essential
  • 8. Le Dubuc Restaurant

    $$

    Come to Le Dubuc for a relaxed atmosphere and tasty Creole cuisine with a view of Tartane Beach. Note that the waiters are friendly, but...

    Come to Le Dubuc for a relaxed atmosphere and tasty Creole cuisine with a view of Tartane Beach. Note that the waiters are friendly, but they generally do not speak English. On Sunday, the service takes longer.

    La Trinité, Tartane, n/a Martinique, Martinique
    0596-74--27--16

    Known For

    • Fresh fruit juices and colorful cocktails
    • Creole style chatrou (octopus)
    • Great location near the beach

    Restaurant Details

    Rate Includes: Reservations recommended on Sun.
  • 9. Le Grand Trianon Boulangerie

    $

    If you need a fast French lunch break in Le François, try this bakery in town, near the Carrefour Supermarket. Crisp baguettes and luscious pastries...

    If you need a fast French lunch break in Le François, try this bakery in town, near the Carrefour Supermarket. Crisp baguettes and luscious pastries and ice cream are sold, as are prix-fixe lunches with sandwiches or salads. French ladies love to "do lunch" here. 

    Centre Cial Ancienne Usine, Le François, n/a Martinique, Martinique
    0596-56--89--81

    Known For

    • Quick lunch
    • French-style baked goods
    • Salads and sandwiches
  • 10. Le Pitaya

    $$$

    This award-winning hotel restaurant is not only good but affordable. The menu changes nightly, but many items do find their way back regularly. The most...

    This award-winning hotel restaurant is not only good but affordable. The menu changes nightly, but many items do find their way back regularly. The most economical choice is usually the menu du jour, a modestly priced prix-fixe of three courses. Among the main courses, housemade prawn ravioli with lemongrass infused vegetable medley never disappoints. Lobster is always available—as a grilled half lobster with an assortment of sauces. Relatively small, but open-air and overlooking the dramatically lit pool, it is best for outside guests to reserve.

    rue Chacha, Les Trois-Îlets, n/a Martinique, 97229, Martinique
    0596-66--05--30

    Known For

    • Menu du jour
    • Lobster
    • Open-air dining

    Restaurant Details

    Rate Includes: Reservations essential
  • 11. Liv'Bar

    $

    Facing the beach, this lively restaurant bar has great views and solid Caribbean food and cocktails. Fresh grilled seafood plates with a side of rice...

    Facing the beach, this lively restaurant bar has great views and solid Caribbean food and cocktails. Fresh grilled seafood plates with a side of rice and local vegetables are prominent on the menu.

    19 blvd. Allegre, Le Marin, n/a Martinique, 97290, Martinique
    696-37--76--53

    Known For

    • Sea views
    • Inventive cocktails
    • Grilled seafood plates

    Restaurant Details

    Rate Includes: Closed Mon. No dinner Tues.
  • 12. Restaurant Le Golf

    $$$

    You may not expect a golf course to house a great restaurant, but once you're at this terraced, alfresco location, you will find yourself wowed...

    You may not expect a golf course to house a great restaurant, but once you're at this terraced, alfresco location, you will find yourself wowed as you look out on acres of rolling greens and the turquoise blue of the Caribbean beyond. The real accomplishment, however, is on the plates. This chef can elevate a torchon de foie gras or red snapper fillet to fine art. And the food is usually light enough to allow room for one of the rich and satisfying desserts. Theme nights, concerts, and musical entertainment are worth experiencing. Frederic Vasson, the main entertainer here, has opened L’Annex in Marin at the new port.

    Les Trois-Îlets, n/a Martinique, 97229, Martinique
    0596-48–20–84

    Known For

    • The view
    • Red snapper fillet elevated to fine art
    • Traditional desserts like crème brûlée

    Restaurant Details

    Rate Includes: No dinner Sun. and Mon.
  • 13. Atomic Food

    $$$
    Closed Permanently

    Those who loved chef Damien Pelé's restaurant Fleur de Sel are getting a sense of the differences between it and this new spot (named after...

    Those who loved chef Damien Pelé's restaurant Fleur de Sel are getting a sense of the differences between it and this new spot (named after the eponymous song by David Guetta) that has opened in the same location, a 19th-century maison bourgeoise just past the village of Trois Ilets. The menu includes many vegetarian options, the ingredients are organic, and the dishes are wildly colorful with extravagant presentations. A new dining terrace has been added in the garden, and manning a bar made from recycled wood and local bamboo is a flamboyant barman, Antoine, a true mixologist. Tapas are served from 5 pm. As there is a Latin ambience, start the party with a cucumber mojito!

    27 av. de l'Impératrice Josephine, Les Trois-Îlets, n/a Martinique, 97229, Martinique
    0596-68–42–11

    Restaurant Details

    Rate Includes: Closed Sun. Aug.--Oct. No lunch Mar.--Dec.
  • 14. Le Foyaal Bar & Brasserie

    $$
    Closed Permanently

    This versatile brasserie on Fort-de-France's main drag offers a large open dining space and seating on a covered terrace with a view of the sea,...

    This versatile brasserie on Fort-de-France's main drag offers a large open dining space and seating on a covered terrace with a view of the sea, though traffic, noise, and dust make eating inside a safer bet. For a light lunch you could have a savory crepe and a small salad, smoked marlin, fried Camembert, or a perfect burger. If you want to go with something more substantial, and creative, there's local octopus or duck in a citrusy sauce. Some waiters speak English, and most are fun and helpful. Foyaal serves from 7 am into the late night, 1:30 am, even on Sundays when most of the town is closed up. Try sitting at the bar; it's fun and for a lot of French expats, this is their "Cheers." Upstairs at Le Césaire is a more refined (and expensive) dining experience.

    38 rue de Ernest Proges, Fort-de-France, n/a Martinique, 97200, Martinique
    0596-63–00–38

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