Jamaica

Touring Jamaica can be both thrilling and frustrating. Rugged (albeit beautiful) terrain and winding (often potholed) roads make for slow going. Always check conditions before you set off by car, but especially in the rainy season, June through October, when roads can be washed out. Two-lane primary roads that loop around and across the island are not particularly well marked. Numbered addresses are seldom used outside major townships, locals drive aggressively, and people and animals have a knack for appearing out of nowhere. That said, Jamaica's scenery shouldn't be missed. To be safe and avoid frustration, stick to guided tours and licensed taxis.

If you're staying in Kingston or Port Antonio, set aside at least one day for the capital and another for a guided excursion to the Blue Mountains. There's at least three days of activity along Mo'Bay's boundaries, but also consider a day trip to Negril or Ocho Rios. If you're based in Ocho Rios, be sure to visit Dunn's River Falls; you may also want to stop by Bob Marley's birthplace, Nine Mile, or Firefly, the restored home of Noël Coward. If Negril is your hub, take in the South Coast, including Y.S. Falls and the Black River.

Sort by: 78 Recommendations {{numTotalPoiResults}} {{ (numTotalPoiResults===1)?'Recommendation':'Recommendations' }} 0 Recommendations
CLEAR ALL Area Search CLEAR ALL
Loading...
Loading...
  • 1. 876 Beach Club

    Located along Falmouth's scenic coast, this is one of the town's only beaches that isn't attached to a resort. The property does have guestrooms available, but most visitors come for the day to enjoy the clean white-sand beach, which offers a water obstacle course, volleyball, and other beach sports, along with changing rooms, showers, a restaurant and bar (you must call ahead to request permission if bringing your own food and drink). Admission includes beach chairs and cabanas, and Wi-Fi is available. Amenities: food and drink; lifeguards; parking (free); showers; toilets; water sports. Best for: partiers; sunset; swimming.

    Hwy A1., Falmouth, Trelawny, Jamaica
    876-475–9090

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: JMD $1000
  • 2. Appleton Estate

    One of the Caribbean's premier rum distillers, Appleton Estate offers guided tours illustrating the history of rum making in the region. The tour begins with a lively discussion of the days when sugarcane was crushed by donkey power, then proceeds to a behind-the-scenes look at the modern facility. Upon being fully educated about rum you can partake of the samples that flow freely. Every visitor receives a complimentary miniature bottle of Appleton. Reservations are not required for the tour are necessary, 24 hours in advance, for lunch. There's also a restaurant, bar, and a gift shop.

    Hwy. B6, Siloah, St. Elizabeth, Jamaica
    876-850--0090

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $30, Closed Sun.
    View Tours and Activities
  • 3. Blue Hole Mineral Spring

    At this mineral spring about 20 minutes from Negril, near the community of Little Bay, you can jump 22 feet off a cliff or climb down a ladder to swim in the hole's icy water. Mud around the water's edge is said to be good for your skin, and the water itself is reputed to have therapeutic properties. For those who cannot jump or climb, water is pumped into a swimming pool at the surface. A bar and grill, a volleyball court, and a motel complete the property. You can also tour a marijuana farm nearby. Take a chartered taxi from Negril, or call to organize a pickup.

    Negril, Westmoreland, Jamaica
    876-860–8805

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $20 for mineral spring; $20 for marijuana farm tour
  • 4. Bob Marley Museum

    At the height of his career, Bob Marley purchased a house on Kingston's Hope Road and added a recording studio—painted Rastafarian red, yellow, and green. It now houses this museum, the capital's best-known tourist sight. The guided tour takes you through rooms wallpapered with magazine and newspaper articles that chronicle his rise to stardom. There's a 20-minute biographical film on Marley's career. You can also see the bullet holes in the walls from a politically motivated assassination attempt in 1976. On the property is a gift shop, record shop, and the One Love Cafe.

    56 Hope Rd., Kingston, Jamaica
    876-630–1588

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $20 to tour studio; $25 to tour museum and grounds; $40 to tour studio, museum, and grounds
    View Tours and Activities
  • 5. Chukka Good Hope Estate

    About a 20-minute drive inland from Falmouth, this 2,000-acre estate provides a sense of Jamaica's rich history as a sugar-producing island, incredible views of the Martha Brae River, and loads of fun. An adventure park offers zip-lining, river tubing, a great house tour, access to a colonial village, an aviary, a swimming pool, a challenge course for adults, and a kids' play area (with its own challenge course). The Riverside Restaurant & Bar, which serves Jamaican food and delicious drinks and cocktails, and a gift shop in the old sugar factory round out the amenities. Park passes get you access to all activities.

    Falmouth, Trelawny, Jamaica
    876-619–1441

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $69
  • Recommended Fodor’s Video

  • 6. Dolphin Cove

    Surrounded by lush rain forest, Dolphin Cove is one of the island's top marine attractions. Packages allow you to touch, dance, or swim with the well-trained and friendly dolphins, who also love to receive a pat or a kiss goodbye. Other water sports and activities, including snorkeling, glass-bottom kayaking, boat rides, swimming with stingrays, and shark shows are offered. In addition to marine life, you can interact with such fauna as iguanas, snakes, and exotic birds on the jungle trail walk. There's also a small ice-cream parlor, restaurant, and gift shop.

    Belmont Rd., Ocho Rios, St. Ann, Jamaica
    876-974--5335

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: From $69, Closed Sun.–Mon. and Thurs.
  • 7. Dunn's River Falls

    Body Of Water/Waterfall

    A popular natural attraction that is an eye-catching sight: 600 feet of cold, clear mountain water splashing over a series of stone steps to the Caribbean Sea. The best way to enjoy the falls is to climb the slippery steps in a swimsuit (there are changing rooms at the entrance), as you take the hand of the person ahead of you. The entrance, which looks like one for an amusement park, is usually crowded, especially when cruise ships are in port, but it is well organized. It's easy to make arrangements and get trusted guides who will offer bits of local lore while showing you where to step. After the climb, you exit through a crowded market, another reminder that this is one of Jamaica's top tourist attractions. If you can, try to visit on a day when no cruise ships are in port. Always climb with a licensed guide at Dunn's River Falls. Freelance guides might be a little cheaper, but the experienced guides can tell you just where to plant each footstep—helping you prevent a fall. Ask for a guide at the Dunn's River Falls ticket window. Official licensed guides are inside the Dunn's River Falls property, not outside the gate. They should be able to show you credentials if asked. If you arrange the tour through a resort or cruise ship, the guides provided will be licensed.

    Off Rte. A1, between St. Ann's Bay and Ocho Rios, Ocho Rios, St. Ann, Jamaica
    876-974–2857

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $20
  • 8. Dunn's River Falls & Park

    A popular natural attraction that is an eye-catching sight: 600 feet of cold, clear mountain water splashing over a series of stone steps to the Caribbean Sea. The best way to enjoy the falls is to climb the slippery steps in a swimsuit (there are changing rooms at the entrance), as you take the hand of the person ahead of you. The entrance looks like it leads to an amusement park, and it's usually crowded, especially when cruise ships are in port, but it is well organized. It's easy to make arrangements and get trusted guides who will offer bits of local lore while showing you where to step. After the climb, you exit through a crowded market—another reminder that this is one of Jamaica's top tourist attractions. If you can, try to visit on a day when no cruise ships are in port. Ask for a guide at the Dunn's River Falls ticket window: Official licensed guides are inside the Dunn's River Falls property, not outside the gate. They should be able to show you credentials if asked. If you arrange the tour through a resort or cruise ship, the guides provided will be licensed.  Always climb with a licensed guide at Dunn's River Falls. Freelance guides might be a little cheaper, but the experienced guides can tell you just where to plant each footstep—helping you prevent a fall.

    Main St., Ocho Rios, St. Ann, Jamaica
    876-974–2857

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $25
  • 9. Dunn's River Falls Beach

    You'll find a crowd (especially if there's a cruise ship in town) at the small beach at the foot of the falls, one of Jamaica's most-visited landmarks. Although tiny—considering the crowds—the beach has a great view. Look up for a spectacular vista of the cascading water, the roar from which drowns out the sea as you approach. All-day access to the beach is included in the falls' entrance fee. Amenities: lifeguards; parking (no fee); showers; toilets. Best for: swimming.

    Ocho Rios, St. Ann, Jamaica
    876-974–4767

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $20
  • 10. Good Hope Estate

    Falmouth | Historic Home

    About a 20-minute drive inland from Falmouth, this estate on more than 2,000 acres provides a sense of Jamaica's rich history as a sugar-estate island, incredible views of the Martha Brae River, and loads of fun. An adventure park offers zip-lining, river tubing, a great house tour, access to a colonial village, an aviary, swimming pool, challenge course for adults, and kids' play area with its own challenge course. Guests may get a taste of Jamaica at the Appleton Estate Jamaica Rum Tavern and Jablum Cafe or enjoy spicy goodness from the Walkerswood Jerk Hut. Adventure park passes entitle visitors to all estate activities.

    Trelawny, Trelawny, Jamaica
    876-881–6869

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $55
  • 11. Harmony Beach Park

    Renovated and reopened in 2021, this massive park is the top attraction in the center of Montego Bay. In addition to its large beach, it features a multipurpose sports court, a jogging trail, a park, and a kiddies play area. Wi-Fi is available and there are a few shops selling snacks and drinks. You can also rent chairs and an umbrella. Amenities: food and drink; lifeguards; parking (fee); showers; toilets. Best for: sunset; swimming; walking.

    Jimmy Cliff Blvd., Montego Bay, St. James, Jamaica
    876-656–8031

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free; parking JMD $200 per hour
  • 12. Holywell Park

    In this nature preserve, part of the Blue and John Crow Mountains National Park, nature trails wind through rugged terrain and offer the chance to spot reclusive creatures, including the streamer-tail hummingbird (known as the doctor bird) and the rare swallowtail butterfly. Rustic camping facilities are available, including showers and shelters. It's about 15 miles (25 km) north of Kingston on a very slow and winding road. Bird-watching, guided hikes, and coffee tours are offered.

    Rte. B1, Kingston, Kingston, Jamaica
    876-619--9807

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $20 Blue Mountain peak hike; $25 coffee tour
  • 13. Martha Brae River

    This gentle waterway takes its name from an Arawak woman who drowned herself because she refused to reveal the whereabouts of a local gold mine. According to legend, she agreed to take her Spanish inquisitors there and, on reaching the river, used magic to change its course, drowning herself and the greedy Spaniards with her. Her duppy (ghost) is said to guard the mine's entrance. Rafting on this river is a very popular activity—many operators are on hand to take you for a glide downstream. Admission is for up to two passengers.

    Falmouth, Trelawny, Jamaica
    876-952–0889

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: From $90 (for two adults)
    View Tours and Activities
  • 14. Mystic Mountain

    This attraction covers 100 acres of mountainside rainforest near Dunn's River Falls. Visitors board the Rainforest Sky Explorer, a chairlift that soars through and over the pristine rainforest to the apex of Mystic Mountain. On top, there is a restaurant with spectacular views of Ocho Rios, arts-and-crafts shops, and the attraction's signature tours, the Rainforest Bobsled Jamaica ride and the Rainforest Zipline Canopy ride. Custom-designed bobsleds, inspired by Jamaica's Olympic bobsled team, run downhill on steel rails at a speed controlled by the driver, using simple push-pull levers. Couples can run their bobsleds in tandem. The zipline tours streak through the lush rainforest under the care of an expert guide who points out items of interest. The entire facility was built using environmentally friendly techniques and materials in order to leave the native rainforest undisturbed.

    North Coast Hwy., Ocho Rios, St. Ann, Jamaica
    876-579--2180

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: From $150, Closed Thurs. and Fri.
    View Tours and Activities
  • 15. Puerto Seco Beach

    Completely renovated in 2018, this public beach looks out on Discovery Bay, the location where, according to tradition, Christopher Columbus first came ashore on this island. The explorer sailed in search of freshwater but found none, naming the stretch of sand Puerto Seco, or "dry port." Today, the beach is anything but dry. Along with the beach, there's a 150-foot pool, and guests can rent beach chairs, umbrellas, and private cabanas (for larger groups). There's a restaurant and bar, but guests can't bring their own food. There's also a waterpark and a dolphin attraction. Amenities: food and drink; lifeguards; parking (no fee); showers; toilets. Best for: snorkeling; swimming.

    Discovery Bay, Runaway Bay, St. Ann, Jamaica
    876-913--5655

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: JMD $2000
  • 16. Reach Falls

    One of Jamaica's most stunning natural waterfalls, Reach Falls was discovered by runaway slaves from nearby plantations who sought refuge in the hills of Portland. One of the waterfall's most fascinating features is the holes in the rocks that have been carved by flowing water—the most fun (and slightly terrifying) is the rabbit hole, which leads to a secret underwater cave that you can swim in!

    off Hwy. A4, Port Antonio, Portland, Jamaica
    876-276--8663

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $10, Closed Mon. and Tues.
  • 17. Rose Hall Great House

    In the 1700s, it may well have been one of the greatest great houses in the West Indies. Today it's popular less for its architecture than for the legend surrounding its second mistress, Annie Palmer. As the story goes, she was born in 1802 in England, but when she was 10, her family moved to Haiti. Soon after, her parents died of yellow fever. Adopted by a Haitian voodoo priestess, Annie became skilled in the practice of witchcraft. She moved to Jamaica, married, and became the mistress of Rose Hall, an enormous plantation spanning 6,600 acres with more than 2,000 slaves.  A spooky nighttime tour of the property—recommended if you're up for a scare—is offered every evening. After the tour, have a drink at the White Witch pub, in the great house's cellar.

    North Coast Hwy., Montego Bay, St. James, Jamaica
    876-953–2341

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $25 for day tour; $30 for night tour, Closed Sun.
  • 18. Seven Mile Beach

    Stretching for 7 miles (11 km)—from Bloody Bay in the north along Long Bay to the cliffs on the southern edge of town—this long, white-sand beach is probably Jamaica's finest. Some stretches remain undeveloped, but these are increasingly few. Along the main stretch, the sand is public to the high-water mark, and visitors and vendors parade from end to end. The walk is sprinkled with good beach bars and open-air restaurants, some of which charge a small fee to use their beach facilities. Bloody Bay is lined with large all-inclusive resorts; these sections are mostly private. Jamaica's best-known nude beach, at Hedonism II, is always among the busiest; only resort guests or day-pass holders may sun here. Amenities: food and drink; lifeguards; parking (no fee); toilets; showers; water sports. Best for: partiers; sunset; swimming; walking.

    Norman Manley Blvd., Negril, Westmoreland, Jamaica

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 19. Somerset Falls

    On the Daniels River, these falls are in a veritable botanical garden. A concrete walk takes you past the ruins of a Spanish aqueduct and Genesis Falls before reaching Hidden Falls. At Hidden Falls itself you board a boat and travel beneath the tumbling water; more daring travelers can swim in a whirlpool or jump off the falls into a pool of water. There are also waterslides for kids and lifeguards on deck. The bar and restaurant specializes in jerk chicken and local seafood and is a great place to catch your breath.

    Rte. A4, Port Antonio, Portland, Jamaica
    876-913–0046

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $12
  • 20. Y. S. Falls

    A quiet alternative to Dunn's River Falls in Ocho Rios, these falls are part of a cattle and horse farm and are reached via a tractor and trailer. There is actually a series of seven falls on the property that cascade into natural pools. An exhilarating zipline zooms over them. Other features include a river pool, a garden, a gift shop, and a lounge with food.

    Jamaica
    876-997–6360

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: $20 waterfalls; $49 canopy, Closed Mon.
    View Tours and Activities

No sights Results

Please try a broader search, or expore these popular suggestions:

There are no results for {{ strDestName }} Sights in the searched map area with the above filters. Please try a different area on the map, or broaden your search with these popular suggestions:

Recommended Fodor’s Video