15 Best Restaurants in Wan Chai, Hong Kong

Liu Yuan Pavilion

$$ | Wan Chai Fodor's choice

Often regarded as one of the best Shanghainese restaurants in town, Liu Yuan’s cooking style stays loyal to tradition with a no-fuss mentality that has worked in their favor for years. Easy favorites include sweet strips of crunchy eel, panfried meat buns, and steamed xiao long bao dumplings plumped up with minced pork and broth.

Samsen

$$ | Wan Chai Fodor's choice
Chef Adam Cliff made his name at Chachawan in Sheung Wan before opening this, his very own, Thai noodle shop on a historic Wan Chai street. You can spot the open-air restaurant from a mile away, due to the nonstop line out the door—the wait is worth it for Cliff's fresh and flavorful Thai boat noodles, pad Thai, pomelo salads, crab omelettes, and lots of street-style classics.
68 Stone Nullah La., Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Known For
  • super-slurpable Wagyu beef boat noodles
  • refreshing Thai watermelon juice—spiked with vodka
  • colorful, retro-inspired Thai shophouse decor

22 Ships

$$$ | Wan Chai

Enjoy a fun, communal dining experience at this buzzing tapas bar opened by celebrated chef Jason Atherton. Expect a creative and contemporary menu with to-share dishes from Ibérico pork and foie gras miniburgers to toasted bread filled with ham, truffles, and melty manchego cheese. Be sure to arrive early, since the restaurant only seats 38 people around the open kitchen and by the windows. Fortunately, you can always take advantage of the fantastic sherries and sangrias while you wait for a seat outside.

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Bo Innovation: The Hong Kong Story

$$$$ | Wan Chai

The mastermind behind this three-Michelin-starred restaurant is Alvin Leung, who dubs himself the “demon chef” and has the moniker tattooed on his arm. Bo Innovation serves what he calls “X-treme Chinese” cuisine, applying contemporary twists to traditional Cantonese dishes.

60 Johnston Rd., Hong Kong, Hong Kong
2850–8371
Known For
  • signature xiao long bao (soup dumpling)
  • two different (Red or Blue) multicourse tasting menus
  • thoughtful design with Hong Kong motifs and artwork
Restaurants Details
Rate Includes: No lunch Sat. Closed Sun., Credit cards accepted, Reservations essential

Capital Café

$ | Wan Chai

It’s a blast from the past at this retro Hong Kong café, done up in period '80s and '90s decor, complete with autographed Cantopop idol posters from that era. The food is old-school as well, and you’ll find hearty local specialties like elbow macaroni with barbecued pork, milk tea, and toasted sandwiches filled with fluffy scrambled eggs. If you come after 3 pm, try the “principal's toast”—it’s black truffle paste and cheese smothered on thick pieces of bread. It’s delicious indulgence done the cheap and cheerful way.

Catalunya

$$$ | Wan Chai

This is, without a doubt, one of the finest Spanish restaurants in the city. The experience begins with the space itself, which combines Spain’s classical nuances with the contemporary vibe of a cosmopolitan city. There are two main dining rooms where you can enjoy the Catalan-inspired recipes. Highlights from the tapas menu include the bombas (deep-fried pork and beef meatballs covered in potato purée and bread crumbs) and the famous ham, cheese, and truffle “bikini” sandwiches. Another must-try is the Segovian-style roasted suckling pig, which is large enough to feed four. Catalunya also offers exceptional weekend brunches with free-flowing sparkling wine. Book early if you want to join the fun.

Che's Cantonese Restaurant

$$ | Wan Chai

Smartly dressed locals in the know head for this casually elegant dim sum specialist, which is in the middle of the downtown bustle yet well concealed on the fourth floor of an office building. From the elevator, you’ll step into a classy Cantonese world. It’s hard to find a single better dim sum dish than Che’s crispy pork buns, whose sugary baked pastry conceals the brilliant saltiness of barbecued pork within. Other dim sum to try include pan-fried turnip cake and a refreshing dessert of cold pomelo and sago with mango juice for a calming end to an exciting meal.

54–62 Lockhart Rd., Hong Kong, Hong Kong
2528–1123
Restaurants Details
Rate Includes: Credit cards accepted

DiVino Patio

$$$ | Wan Chai

Located along a stretch of semi-alfresco eateries known as Brim 28 (named after its waterside location on 28 Harbour Road), DiVino Patio touts rustic, homestyle Italian fare to match its laid-back surroundings. The expansive space is designed like a retro grocery store, and you can purchase gourmet condiments, salumi, and cheeses to enjoy on the go. For eat-in orders, try any of the hand-tossed pizzas, or go for one of the succulent selections from the rotisserie. The spit-roasted Vallespluga game hen is exceptional, with tender meat and crispy skin. The restaurant also has an excellent lunchtime antipasti buffet matched with a rotating choice of mains.

Dynasty Restaurant

$$$$ | Wan Chai

Dining on haute Cantonese cuisine at this stunning restaurant with panoramic views over Victoria Harbour is a memorable experience. The chefs here are famed for adapting family-style recipes into elegant dishes, and the service is impeccable yet friendly. The menu changes with the seasons and leans heavily toward fresh seafood, though the barbecued pork is also a must-try. With its high ceilings, old-world charm, and laid-back tempo, Dynasty is one of the rare top-notch restaurants where you can comfortably linger over a meal.

1 Harbour Rd., Hong Kong, Hong Kong
2584–6971
Restaurants Details
Rate Includes: Credit cards accepted

Han Ga Ram

$$$ | Wan Chai

Come here for a refined, modern rendition of classic Korean cuisine. Barbecued meats are a must, and we especially recommend the sam gyup sal (thick slabs of pork belly). Moving away from the conventional dishes, Han Ga Ram also offers a few newfangled creations such as bulgogi beef and spicy pork sliders, which are available on the lunch menu. Traditionalists may want to wash down their meal with soju (a distilled rice liquor), but the staff is also happy to suggest wine pairings to go with each dish.

Kam Fung

$ | Wan Chai

The space is dingy, the tables are cramped, and the staff is brash—but the food makes it all worth it. Kam Fung has been around for more than five decades, serving traditional Hong Kong café fare such as crumbly crusted freshly baked egg tarts, and pineapple buns wedged with a thick slab of butter. Wash everything down with the velvety smooth milk tea after a meal that’s cheap, quick, and absolutely satisfying.

41 Spring Garden Lane, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
2572–0526
Restaurants Details
Rate Includes: No dinner., No credit cards

La Crêperie

$ | Wan Chai

This French-owned spot specializes in authentic, thin Breton crêpes filled with all sorts of sweet or savory fillings. Most of the clientele is French, which is a good indication of the authenticity of the food. Fillings for these made-fresh-to-order pancakes range from traditional to experimental; La Complète buckwheat galette is loaded with a classic combination of egg, ham, and deliciously gooey melted cheese, while L’Italienne has tomato, mozzarella cheese, anchovies, and olives. The dessert crêpe selection is just as wide-ranging. La Crêperie also carries a delicious apple cider—the traditional drink of choice for accompanying galettes in Brittany.

La Crêperie

$ | Sheung Wan

One Harbour Road

$$$$ | Wan Chai

It’s hard to say what’s more impressive at the Grand Hyatt’s Cantonese showpiece—the interior design (two terraced levels boasting an incredible sense of space and motion), or the view over the harbor from the floor-to-ceiling windows. Unlike many harborside establishments, though, you don’t need a window seat to catch the view. And the cuisine is traditional but excellent—order one of the signature barbecued meats and don’t be afraid to splurge on seafood. The restaurant offers a wine-pairing menu and there’s also a knowledgeable sommelier on hand to provide pairing suggestions for specific dishes.

Stone Nullah Tavern

$$$ | Wan Chai

Tucked away on a quiet street across from the famed Blue House, Stone Nullah Tavern serves new American cuisine that revolves around locally sourced ingredients. The menu changes regularly, but you’ll always find unabashedly hearty offerings such as cheddar mac and cheese and the notorious "fat kid cake" (essentially four desserts mixed into one). Adventurous diners will enjoy the wide selection of offal-centric dishes, including crispy pig’s head, tripe “fries,” and chicken liver dip served with homemade potato chips.