The Southern Atlantic Coast

We’ve compiled the best of the best in The Southern Atlantic Coast - browse our top choices for the top things to see or do during your stay.

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  • 1. Musée Municipale du Patrimoine Amazighe

    Agadir's municipal museum celebrates the Amazigh heritage of the region with collections of photography, jewelry, artifacts, and local handicrafts, as well as temporary exhibits. It's...

    Agadir's municipal museum celebrates the Amazigh heritage of the region with collections of photography, jewelry, artifacts, and local handicrafts, as well as temporary exhibits. It's worth a visit to learn about the symbolism seen in Amazigh carpets and jewelry; there's also information about the Igouder (plural of agadir, a communal granary) of the local villages. If you're lucky, an English-speaking intern may be on hand to guide you around.

    Agadir, Souss-Massa, Morocco
    0528-82–16–32

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: 10 DH, Closed Sun.
  • 2. Palais Claudio Bravo

    Chilean artist Claudio Bravo came to Morocco in 1972 and built this palatial home-turned-museum with stunning gardens and stables 10 km (6 miles) outside Taroudant....

    Chilean artist Claudio Bravo came to Morocco in 1972 and built this palatial home-turned-museum with stunning gardens and stables 10 km (6 miles) outside Taroudant. Following his death in 2011, the estate became a museum showcasing his art and collections, including works by friends like Picasso. The palace is divided into several pavilions connected by inner courtyards and covered walkways, while inside the guest rooms, salons, and Bravo’s private rooms and studios are paintings, sculptures, and artifacts, including Roman and North African ceramics. Wander through the gardens full of exotic plants to the large water basin, and rest in the shade of a pavilion with a cup of tea and views of the Atlas Mountains. A full guided tour takes two to three hours, but it’s possible to do an unguided visit of the gardens. The hefty entry fee includes transportation by horse carriage from the entrance to the main building. You must reserve in advance to visit. You can also reserve for lunch or dinner (expect to pay 400 DH–500 DH per person).

    Rte. de Tamaloukt, Taroudant, Souss-Massa, 83000, Morocco
    0691-24–21–61

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Guided tour 200 DH, gardens only 100 DH, Closed Mon.
  • 3. Port of Essaouira

    Built in 1769 in the reign of Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah by an Englishman who had converted to Islam, Essaouira's port is still going strong...

    Built in 1769 in the reign of Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah by an Englishman who had converted to Islam, Essaouira's port is still going strong in the southwest corner of town, and it's the one must-see sight for any traveler coming here. Trawlers and other boats bob along the quay, and middlemen and independent sailors sell the daily catch of sardines, calamari, and skate from small dockside tables. You'll be selling yourself short if you don't have a meal of the freshest fish imaginable at one of the shoreside grill restaurants. As Moroccan ports go, it's also one of the most beautiful, not to mention accessible and tourist-friendly.

    Essaouira, Marrakesh-Safi, Morocco
  • 4. Agadir Beach

    The beach here swings around a crescent from southeast to northwest; you're more likely to find a quiet spot if you wander south, although be...

    The beach here swings around a crescent from southeast to northwest; you're more likely to find a quiet spot if you wander south, although be careful to avoid the private beaches of the resorts. The most crowded areas, frequented year-round by families and locals, are to the north. Along the flanking thoroughfare, known as the Corniche (promenade), are cafés, bars, and restaurants. At the very northern end is the swanky marina development where private yachts are moored. The promenade comes alive at dusk, when families and youngsters take their evening walks, but as night falls, it can become a little sketchy. Nonetheless, from the shelter of a café terrace, it's still a good spot to stop and watch the world go by. The northern tip is also the place to rent a Jet Ski, catamaran, or surf equipment. Amenities: food and drink; water sports. Best for: sunset.

    Agadir, Souss-Massa, Morocco
    View Tours and Activities
  • 5. Ammeln Valley

    The Ammeln Valley is becoming a magnet not only for climbers but also for nature lovers and hikers. A walk in the valley might start...

    The Ammeln Valley is becoming a magnet not only for climbers but also for nature lovers and hikers. A walk in the valley might start at the village of Oumesnat, where the Maison Traditionelle is well worth a visit.  Wear sturdy shoes for the short walk from the car park. At this museum in a traditional Amazigh house, the caretakers will happily explain the old ways of the Anti-Atlas, introducing you to domestic implements, the tea ceremony, and the local women's embroidered black wrap, the tamelheft. Express your appreciation for the tour by tipping generously. From Oumesnat you can follow paths to the neighboring villages. Taghdicte makes a good base for ambitious Anti-Atlas climbers. 

    Tafraoute, Souss-Massa, Morocco
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  • 6. Bayt Dakira

    A new historical, cultural, and spiritual landmark in Essaouira, this museum in the Mellah dedicated to Jewish heritage and culture celebrates the Moroccan Jewish culture...

    A new historical, cultural, and spiritual landmark in Essaouira, this museum in the Mellah dedicated to Jewish heritage and culture celebrates the Moroccan Jewish culture that once dominated Essaouira, as well as the continuing mutual respect between Muslim and Jewish communities in Morocco. Within the space are the Simon Attias synagogue, the museum Bayt Dakira, and the Haim and Célia Zafrani International Research Center for the study of the history of relations between Judaism and Islam. The exhibits are based around rare objects and photographs illustrating the history of Jewish life and culture in the area. 

    Rue Ziry Ibn Atiyah, Essaouira, Marrakesh-Safi, Morocco
    0524-66--35--87

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 7. Cap Rhir

    During most of the year, a few stray Western surfers seek out waves around the bend from the lighthouse at Cap Rhir. There are no...

    During most of the year, a few stray Western surfers seek out waves around the bend from the lighthouse at Cap Rhir. There are no facilities, so it's ideal for those seeking a quiet sunset. You may come across a bald ibis in the area north of the lighthouse, which is said to be one of their nesting sites. Amenities: none. Best for: solitude; sunset.

    Cap Rhir, Souss-Massa, Morocco
  • 8. City Walls

    The city walls of Taroudant date from the 16th century and are unique in their completeness and for the fact that the new city has...

    The city walls of Taroudant date from the 16th century and are unique in their completeness and for the fact that the new city has not yet encroached upon them, making the 7½ km (4½ miles) of walls easily visible and approachable. There are five main entry points into the city (from the northwest, going clockwise): Bab el Kasbah, Bab Zorgan, Bab Targhount, Bab Ouled Bounouna, and Bab el Khemis. The one place to climb upstairs onto the ramparts for a view across the town is at Bab el Kasbah.  The best way to see the ramparts is at sunset in a calèche (horse and trap) as the setting sun casts a golden glow over the walls.

    Taroudant, Souss-Massa, Morocco
  • 9. Dar Baroud

    Diagonally across from Bab Sedra, across Avenue Moulay Rachid and with the hospital on your right, is the Dar Baroud, once a French ammunition-storage facility....

    Diagonally across from Bab Sedra, across Avenue Moulay Rachid and with the hospital on your right, is the Dar Baroud, once a French ammunition-storage facility. This high-walled building is closed to the public—and is locally rumored to be haunted—but stand back on the sidewalk opposite and you can admire its delicate carved stone walls from the exterior.

    Taroudant, Souss-Massa, Morocco
  • 10. Dar Souiri

    Medina

    Home to the active Essaouira-Mogador Association, Dar Souiri is the hub of cultural life in Essaouira, with a notice board outside the door with information...

    Home to the active Essaouira-Mogador Association, Dar Souiri is the hub of cultural life in Essaouira, with a notice board outside the door with information on upcoming festivals, concerts, film screenings, and other cultural events. Inside, the building is an excellent example of 18th-century Mogador (a former name of the city) architecture and houses an art gallery and a library. Free Wi-Fi is available.

    2, rue de Caire, Essaouira, Marrakesh-Safi, Morocco
    0524-47–52–68

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Closed Sun.
  • 11. Diabat Beach

    Diabat

    Essaouira's beach is fine for an early-morning jog or a late-afternoon game of soccer, but serious sunbathers typically head south to quiet Diabat. Walking along...

    Essaouira's beach is fine for an early-morning jog or a late-afternoon game of soccer, but serious sunbathers typically head south to quiet Diabat. Walking along the beach, cross over the mouth of the river and continue past the Borj el Baroud, a former Portuguese fortification. To your left, a few miles south of town nestled in eucalyptus fields, you'll see the ruins of the so-called Sultan's Palace. This building is said to have inspired Jimi Hendrix to write "Castles in the Sand," although he actually released the track a couple of years before his visit to this village, which has been trading on his name ever since. On a windy day the only escape is behind the Borj at low tide. Amenities: none. Best for: solitude; sunset.

    Essaouira, Marrakesh-Safi, Morocco
  • 12. Essaouira Bay

    Essaouira's main beach is a sweep of sand along the bay that has provided shelter to seafarers from Atlantic storms since antiquity. Although temperatures are...

    Essaouira's main beach is a sweep of sand along the bay that has provided shelter to seafarers from Atlantic storms since antiquity. Although temperatures are moderate all year and the sun is nearly always shining, the wind is consistently strong, making sunbathing or swimming less attractive than farther south in Agadir. Nonetheless, sunbed rentals are relatively inexpensive or even free if you eat at one of the cafés at the southern end of the beach. The wind comes from the north and creates three main areas. The most northerly part, tucked up into the armpit of the port, has wind that comes in gusts. Just south of this the wind strengthens, with fewer gusts. Farther south are the steady, strong trade winds the town is known for, and that make it a mecca for wind and kitesurfers. The range of areas makes the bay perfect for every level of water-sports enthusiast. The surrounding islets, the Iles de Mogador, are home to nine bird species, including the endangered Eleanora's falcon. They are closed to visitors during breeding season (April to October), but otherwise you can get a boat trip from the port, with boats leaving morning and afternoon depending on weather conditions. Amenities: food and drink; lifeguards (summer only); toilets; parking (fee); water sports. Best for: sunset; swimming; walking; windsurfing.

    Essaouira, Marrakesh-Safi, Morocco
  • 13. Fikra Travel

    Medina

    Based out of Essaouira and Ouarzazate, Fikra Travel offers personalized tours of Morocco, specializing in the south and desert regions. It will tailor tours to...

    Based out of Essaouira and Ouarzazate, Fikra Travel offers personalized tours of Morocco, specializing in the south and desert regions. It will tailor tours to suit your traveling needs and often deals with small groups and families traveling by 4x4, but can also offer routes by bus, camel, or even donkey.

    Rue Laalouj, Essaouira, Marrakesh-Safi, Morocco
    0662-82–55–46
  • 14. Gazelle Rock Carving

    The prehistoric gazelle rock carving just 2 km (1 mile) south of Tafraoute is an easy walk or bike ride from town, and although the...

    The prehistoric gazelle rock carving just 2 km (1 mile) south of Tafraoute is an easy walk or bike ride from town, and although the sparse etching has been retouched, it still gives you an idea about how long these desolate mountains have sustained human cultures. To get here, follow signs to "Tazka" from behind Hôtel Les Amandiers; go through the village to the palm and argan fields beyond. You may have offers to guide you from local children: if you accept, then be sure to thank them with a small gift, such as a pen or toy, but avoid giving money. Although everyone calls it a gazelle, locals in the know will tell you that the celebrated rock carving is in fact of a mouflon (wild sheep). Those energetic enough can visit more cave paintings at Ukas, south of the town of Souk Had Issi, 50 km (31 miles) southeast of Tafraoute.

    Tafraoute, Souss-Massa, Morocco
  • 15. Grande Mosquée

    The minaret of the Grande Mosquée is the oldest example in Morocco of a Saharan–style minaret, an architectural feature more commonly seen in Niger and...

    The minaret of the Grande Mosquée is the oldest example in Morocco of a Saharan–style minaret, an architectural feature more commonly seen in Niger and Mali. Perches poke out from all sides, making it look like someone forgot to take out the scaffolding after it was completed. These perches are said to assist the dead in their ascent to paradise. Non-Muslims cannot enter the mosque. 

    Tiznit, Souss-Massa, Morocco
  • 16. Imouzzer Cascades

    If you're looking for a more isolated and less developed excursion away from the beach, the waterfalls in the Ida Outanane Mountains, near Immouzer des...

    If you're looking for a more isolated and less developed excursion away from the beach, the waterfalls in the Ida Outanane Mountains, near Immouzer des Ida Outananeup, make an ideal day trip from Agadir, with many opportunities for walking and hiking. Check with locals—the waterfalls are often dry when the region is experiencing drought. On your way you'll pass through the palm gorge of Paradise Valley, where the rocky riverbank welcomes picnicking Moroccan families and foreigners alike. The Amazigh souk in Immouzer is on Thursday and is a great place to buy local honey. To get here by car from Aourir (12 km [7 miles] north of Agadir), take the paved road 50 km (31 miles) up into the mountains. 

    Agadir, Souss-Massa, Morocco

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Free
  • 17. Jardin de Olhão and Musée de la Mémoire

    Located in the heart of the city, this garden (also called Jardin du Portugal) offers a pleasant, cool green retreat from the heat of the...

    Located in the heart of the city, this garden (also called Jardin du Portugal) offers a pleasant, cool green retreat from the heat of the sun. Built in tribute to Agadir's "twin" city in Portugal, Olhão, it features architecture that recalls that of the Moors of southern Spain. Two pavilions attached to the garden house the Musée de la Mémoire, a moving exhibition of photos and writings documenting the earthquake of February 29,1960, which devastated the city.

    Av. President Kennedy, Agadir, Souss-Massa, Morocco

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: Museum 10 DH, playground 5 DH
  • 18. Kasbah

    High up on the hill to the northwest that looks over Agadir are the few ruins of the old kasbah, the main site of Agadir...

    High up on the hill to the northwest that looks over Agadir are the few ruins of the old kasbah, the main site of Agadir until an earthquake razed the city in 1960. The devastating earthquake created the opportunity for the development of modern Agadir, which stands today to the south. Although there is little to see here of the former city, the panoramas are breathtaking, especially at sunset. The only way to get here is to take a bus with ALSA, the public transportation company, from the parking lot at the foot of the mountain. The bus leaves every 20 minutes from 8 am to 9:30 pm (8:30 pm on Saturdays) and costs 4 DH each way.  Emblazoned on the side of the hill below the kasbah are three Arabic words that keep guard over Agadir at all times. Their meaning? God, country, and the king. By day they're a patchwork of huge white stones against the green grass. At night they're lighted up powerfully against the dark. The huge hill is really a burial mound, covering the old medina and the impromptu graves of those who died in the earthquake.

    Agadir, Souss-Massa, Morocco
  • 19. Kasbah

    In the northeast side of the city, you'll find the kasbah, or the former king's quarter. It was built by Alouite leader Moulay Ismail in...

    In the northeast side of the city, you'll find the kasbah, or the former king's quarter. It was built by Alouite leader Moulay Ismail in the 17th century—some of the pasha's palace remains intact and has been converted into a hotel (Palais Salam, which you can visit for a drink or meal). On Avenue Moulay Rachid, with the main gate (Bab el Kasbah) behind you, you'll see a smaller gate (Bab Sedra) on the right, which is the old entrance into the kasbah quarter. Inside the walls is a typical medina residential area with little left of any original structures apart from the gates. The area in front of the hotel is now a public park and a great place for watching the evening promenade.

    Taroudant, Souss-Massa, Morocco
  • 20. La Medina d'Agadir

    Bensergao

    This combination ethnological museum and bazaar is the dream of Moroccan-born Italian decorator-architect Coco Polizzi, who wanted to replace the medina Agadir lost to the...

    This combination ethnological museum and bazaar is the dream of Moroccan-born Italian decorator-architect Coco Polizzi, who wanted to replace the medina Agadir lost to the 1960 earthquake with a new one on his own land. Located in Ben Sergao, a few miles south of Agadir, on the Inezgane road, the remarkable 13-acre project was completed in 2007 by hundreds of Moroccan craftspeople who used centuries-old techniques. Each stone was laid by hand, and the buildings are made of earth, rock from the Souss, slate from the High Atlas, and local woods such as thuya and eucalyptus. Decorations follow both Amazigh and Saharan motifs. You can find a few mosaic craftspeople, painters, jewelers, metalworkers, and carpenters in workshop nooks throughout the medina. The medina also houses a restaurant, shops, and even an amphitheater. Grands taxis to the medina from Agadir cost around 100 DH round-trip.

    Unknown
    0528-28–02–53

    Sight Details

    Rate Includes: 40 DH, Closed during Eid el Adha

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