Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

Is non-fat milk common in Paris's coffee shop?

Is non-fat milk common in Paris's coffee shop?

Dec 17th, 2004, 08:06 AM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 15
Is non-fat milk common in Paris's coffee shop?

Is non-fat milk common in Paris's coffee shop? thanks
ministrawberry is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 08:12 AM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 5,641
never seen it in any i've gone to. Starbucks probably has it. they normally don't add milk to coffee unless you ask for a coffee creme, coffee with cream.
PalQ is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 08:15 AM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 105
I agree with PalQ, you can probably find it at Starbucks. If you order a regular cafe', you will get a super dark and strong coffee in a tiny espresso cup with a square of sugar and a tiny bar of chocolate. Even in McDonald's.
If you want coffee with cream, it is called a cafe' creme (kaffay krem)
If you want coffee with milk, cafe' au lait.
If your only worried about a few fat grams, i suggest not to worry on vacation. That will take the fun and taste out of everything. And cafe cremes are delicious!
toulousaine is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 08:25 AM
  #4  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 45,821
Nope. Not much of anything non-fat in France, although in supermarkets some new products seem to have been coming out in recent years.

And yet they're as a general rule so much thinner than we are......
StCirq is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 08:30 AM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 105
"And yet they're as a general rule so much thinner than we are......"

Soooo true. We lived there a few years ago, and I noticed how TINY the women were. I weighed 148 when i arrived, and when we left 5 months later, I weighed 118. I ate chocolatines (pain au choc) every morning for breakfast, by the way. TONS of carbs and dairy/duck fats. We really did eat the typical French diet, even though we went to restaurants a lot. There is something to be said about the diet, or the quality of food in France that makes you slim.

toulousaine is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 08:53 AM
  #6  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 359
Maybe they're so thin because the food they eat doesn't have trans fats and corn syrup and all those other wonderful things that can be found in processed food?

My French relatives are fit and thin. Everything they eat is made from scratch (or someone else made it from scratch at, say, the bakery). They eat their big meal at noon, and take their time doing so. Wine is consumed at lunch and at dinner - but no more than one glass. The combination of all these things is apparently keeping them quite healthy.

Dunno where my head was when we were in Paris last July, but I only ever saw one Starbucks the entire time there.
hunnym is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 08:56 AM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,449
I think much of it has to do with portion size. Order an entree and a soda at The Cheesecake Factory if you don't believe me.
Ryan is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 09:00 AM
  #8  
jay
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 998
It also has to do with the fact that you walk everywhere instead of driving. I always end up losing 5 pounds during a two week vacation and i don't eat or drink much differently than usual.
jay is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 09:42 AM
  #9  
ira
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 74,143
> Is non-fat milk common...<

To go with the pain au chocolate, the almond croissant, the lemon macaron...?
ira is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 09:46 AM
  #10  
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 5,432
Non-fat milk is virtually non-existent in France.

They are thin, partly because they eat smaller portions, and don't snack as much as Americans do.

On the other hand, go into any pharmacy in France, and see how many diet pills, anti-cellulite gels etc. they sell there. French women worry about their weight as much as women anywhere.
Tulips is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 09:47 AM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 15,749
Ah, but ira, I'm sure ministrawberry was referring to coffee to go with the diet, non-fat, non sugar pain au chocolate!
Patrick is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 10:00 AM
  #12  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 15
Thanks all your replies. This question was brought up because of cholestrol concerns.
ministrawberry is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 10:11 AM
  #13  
ira
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 74,143
Hi mini,

I also have a cholesterol problem.

French cholesterol doesn't count.
ira is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 10:31 AM
  #14  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 359
I agree with the portion-size theory but that doesn't explain the giant piece of entrecote that ended up on fiance's plate and the huge crepes that ended up on mine. I thought portion sizes were substantial in France. Agreed on the minimal snacking, though.

Ministrawberry, maybe you won't have a chance at any lattes in Paris, but please give the regular cafes a try. They really are delicious. Have a great trip!
hunnym is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 10:49 AM
  #15  
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 6,260
"Cholesterol concerns"???? OK, then stay away from pate, red meat, shellfish, chocolate, whole milk, organ foods, cocoanut, and all your other FAVORITE foods...

ALTERNATVE: STARVE yourself for two weeks before you leave and then you can gain it all back over there. Net result: you come back as thin as when you left and NO guilt!!!
Intrepid1 is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 10:50 AM
  #16  
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,265
Most people in France buy skim milk... 4 percent I think but I could be wrong. I am basing that on what I see at the grocery store where at least 80 percent of the stock is skim milk. I would assume from this that they use mainly skim milk in cafes.
MorganB is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 10:57 AM
  #17  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 11,449
Because of the decline in the dollar versus the Euro, I believe most Americans can only afford the 1.06% milk instead of the full 2%.
Ryan is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 10:59 AM
  #18  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 105
Red wine and duck fat (found in many dishes, especially cassoulet and confit) are extremely good for the cholesterol. Olive oil too. The French don't necessarily eat smaller portions at home. We dined at many French friends homes for dinner, and they served WAY too much. At restaurants you don't get sides like you do here. You have to order them separate.
Even their sweets are not sweet. At first, i was gagging on the cakes etc, that seemed to have no sugar. Even the Coke and Pepsi have much less of a sweet taste.
However, when I returned home, I was gagging on all the sugar here. Stuff was WAY too sweet. unfortunately, i've gotten used to it again.
toulousaine is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 11:34 AM
  #19  
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 5,641
MorganB- my store experience is quite different. I regularly visit the Carrefour Hypermarche by my French son's house and skim milk and low fat milk may make up 50% with whole milk still holding firm. I've seen low-fat milk gradually increase but it's not nearly as prevalent as you say - unless this store is not representative. Just ain't so. My French in-laws generally disdain skim milk - my son won't even drink it - kind of like it was here in the 50s when as a child we turned our noses up at skim milk.
As for the thin French - i see many, many plump older French ladies and gents - the ubiquitous photo-opp of quite obese old gent on moped clutching fresh baguette. Though you rarely see very obese folks, many are overweight in my experience.
PalQ is offline  
Dec 17th, 2004, 11:39 AM
  #20  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 10,605
The obvious cure for having to suffer through 'whole' milk and cream is simply to drink more red wine
Travelnut is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:04 AM.