Jeremy Tarr

Jeremy Tarr

Editorial Director, Fodors.com

Jeremy has been the digital editorial director of Fodor’s Travel since 2016. He oversees a diverse group of opinionated and well-journeyed editors and writers who collectively produce a wide range of daily travel coverage. His work heralds travel trends via Fodor’s annual Go List and No List, the Fodor’s Finest Hotel Awards, and the Fodor’s Travel Awards. While at the helm, Fodors.com won its first Webby Award, the People’s Voice for Best Travel Site in 2019. Previously, he was the managing editor of Fodor’s Travel’s sister-site FlyerTalk, a publication and forum that focuses on frequent flyers, aviation, and the business of travel.

Though he currently lives in Los Angeles with his wife and dogs, he’s resided all over the world including San Francisco, London, Berlin, and Budapest, in which he assumed a Wes Anderson-like role of being the fanciest long-term resident of a hotel.

Assuming the character in a dusty old book, Jeremy has been both penniless and transient (though his shoes are always shined), with highs and lows that included a movie deal in Europe, writing gigs at two start-up digital publications (for which he covered fashion, music, and travel, of course), a partnership in a music video production company, and publication of a critically acclaimed novel that can only be described as an illustrated adult fairy tale.

Now, he regularly roams the globe like a lost ghost searching for a home. In the last year alone, he’s driven the haunted mountains of Transylvania, chatted up the behemoth heads of Easter Island, feasted at the food stalls of Singapore, and cut through the jungle mists of Guatemala.

Q&A

  • Why do you travel?

    It’s healthier than other addictions—but just as expensive.

  • What’s one thing you never travel without?

    Sleeping pills.

  • What’s the first thing you do when you arrive in a new place?

    I unpack. Then I go for a long, long walk, preferably after dark, search out a quiet locals bar, and have a gin.

  • Do you like traveling solo?

    I despise it. I prefer to go everywhere with my wife. It’s easier to see the beauty of the world when she’s around.

  • Carry-on or checked?

    I pack too much for a carry-on. If it were possible, I’d take a steamer trunk.

  • What was your worst travel experience?

    Catching a parasite after trekking the Inca Trail made for a rather uncomfortable homeward journey.

  • If you could live in any hotel, which would it be?

    I once lived in a grand old hotel in Hungary for seven months. It was far less romantic than I thought it would be and I gained twenty pounds by dining in the lounge every night.

  • If you could live anywhere, where would it be?

    I’ve been trying to convince my wife to move into a haunted New Orleans mansion for four years. I’ve thus far been unsuccessful.

  • What's the most unusual place you have stayed on a trip?

    Toss-up between a windmill in Hvar and Pope Julius II’s holiday castle outside of Siena.

  • What items do you always try to bring back as souvenirs?

    I usually attempt to buy a translated copy of "Alice in Wonderland" in every country. I bought a beautiful 1940s Greek edition at Atlantis Books in Santorini.

All Recent Works

Articles

Hotel Reviews

You’re Eating Your Fancy Dinners Wrong

You’re Eating Your Fancy Dinners Wrong

An outrageously gorgeous, outrageously expensive meal is better than just about anything else in the catalog of pleasures. But, according to one Michelin-starred chef, many fine diners would have an even better experience if they followed five simple rules.
Thompson Nashville

Thompson Nashville

$$$ | Tennessee | Nashville

First, let’s get this out of the way: The Thompson is unapologetically trendy

Freehand Los Angeles

Freehand Los Angeles

$$ | California | Los Angeles

Despite being smack-dab in the middle of what was once a forgotten block of Downtown LA, you'll swear you're in Laurel Canyon circa 1967 as soon as ...

Warwick New York

Warwick New York

$$ | New York | New York

This is a hotel with a history

You’re Eating Your Fancy Dinners Wrong

You’re Eating Your Fancy Dinners Wrong

An outrageously gorgeous, outrageously expensive meal is better than just about anything else in the catalog of pleasures. But, according to one Michelin-starred chef, many fine diners would have an even better experience if they followed five simple rules.