Machu Picchu and the Inca Trail Travel Guide

Machu Picchu and the Inca Trail Sights

Inca Trail

  • Start: Km 82 Map It
  • Ollantaytambo
  • Trail/Path

Published 02/07/2017

Fodor's Review

One of the world's signature outdoor excursions, the Inca Trail (Camino Inca in Spanish) is a 43-km (26-mile) sector of the stone path that once extended from Cusco to Machu Picchu. Nothing matches the sensation of walking over the ridge that leads to the Lost City of the Incas just as the sun casts its first yellow glow over the ancient stone buildings.

There are limits on the number of trail users, but you'll still see a lot of fellow trekkers along the way. The four-day trek takes you past ruins and through stunning scenery, starting in the thin air of the highlands and ending in cloud forests. The orchids, hummingbirds, and spectacular mountains aren't bad either.

You must go with a guide and a licensed tour operator, one accredited by SERNANP, the organization that oversees the trail and limits the number of hikers to 500 per day (including guides and porters). There are some 200 such licensed operators in Cusco.

May through September is the best time to

make the four-day trek; rain is more likely in April and October and a certainty the rest of the year. The trail fills up during the dry high season. Make reservations at least four months in advance if you want to hike then—two months in advance the rest of the year. Bear in mind that not only are the number of permits limited, the early comers get the preferred campsite on the third night of the trek, which is much closer to Machu Picchu. That being said, since 2016, many companies are now bypassing the third night of camping and going straight to Aguas Calientes that night, as the last campsite is no longer felt to be as safe. The trek is doable during the rainy season but can become slippery and muddy by November. The trail closes for maintenance each February.

Inca Trail Day by Day

The majority of agencies begin the Inca Trail trek at Km 82, after a two- to three-hour bus ride from Cusco. Tip: opting to stay overnight in Ollantaytambo will allow you to get a bit more sleep before starting out.

Day 1: Compared to what lies ahead, the first day's hike is a reasonably easy 11 km (6.8 miles). You'll encounter fantastic ruins almost immediately. An easy ascent takes you to the first of those, Patallaqta (also called Llactapata). The name means "town on a hillside" in Quechua, and the ruins are thought to have been a village in Inca times. Bingham and company camped here on their first excursion to Machu Picchu. You will see different types of architecture there, both pre-Inca and Inca.

At the end of the day you arrive at Huayllabamba (also called Wayllamba), the only inhabited village on the trail and your first overnight. If the plan is to stay at Aguas Calientes the third night, you'll likely press on to the campsite at Ayapata.

Day 2: This will be your most challenging day of hiking. It's another 10-km (6.2-mile) hike, but with a gain of 1,200 meters (3,940 feet) in elevation. The day is most memorable for the spectacular views and muscle aches after ascending Dead Woman's Pass (also known as Warmiwañusca) at 4,200 meters (13,780 feet). The pass is named for the silhouette created by its mountain ridges—they resemble a woman's head, nose, chin, and chest.

A tricky descent takes you to Pacaymayu, the second night's campsite, and you can pat yourself on the back for completing the hardest section of the Inca Trail. If cutting out the third night, you'll likely go on to Chaquicocha.

Day 3: Downhill! You'll cover the most ground today (16 km, 9.9 miles), descending 1,500 meters to the subtropical cloud forest where the Amazon Basin begins. There's some of the most stunning mountain scenery you'll see during the four days. The ruins of Runkuraqay were a circular Inca storage depot for products transported between Machu Picchu and Cusco. It may have also been used for astrological purposes.

You also pass by Sayacmarca, possibly a way station for priests and others traversing the trail.

Most excursions arrive by midafternoon at Huiñay Huayna (also known as Wiñaywayna), the third night's stopping point, at what may now seem a low and balmy 2,712 meters (8,900 feet). If heading on, you will have lunch here and keep going through the Sun Gate and down to Aguas Calientes to spend the night in a hotel. After dinner there is usually a ceremony to say thank you and good-bye to your cook and porters, as well as to tip them.

There is time to see the ruins of Puyupatamarca (also known as Phuyupatamarca), a beautifully restored site with ceremonial baths, and perhaps the best ruins on the hike. At this point you catch your first glimpse of Machu Picchu peak, but from the back side.

Day 4: Day 4 means the grand finale, arrival at Machu Picchu, the reason for the trail in the first place. You'll be roused from your sleeping bag well before dawn to hike your last 6 km (3.7 miles) to arrive at the ruins in time to catch the sunrise. You'll be amazed at the number of fellow travelers who forget about their soreness and sprint this last stretch.

The trail takes you past the Intipunku, the Sun Gate. Bask in your first sight of the ruins and your accomplishment, but you'll need to circle around and enter Machu Picchu officially through the entrance gate—and don't forget to stamp your passport as you exit, you've earned it.

If you have spent the night in Aguas Caliente, you will take the bus up early in order to enter at 6 am when the site opens.

Prepping for the Inca Trail

You Must Use a Guide: You must use a licensed tour operator, one accredited by SERNANP, the organization that oversees the trail and limits the number of hikers to 500 per day, including guides and porters. There are some 200 such licensed operators in Cusco.

When to Go: May through September is the best time to make the four-day trek; rain is more likely in April and October and a certainty the rest of the year. The trail fills up during the dry high season. Make reservations months in advance if you want to hike then—weeks in advance the rest of the year. The trek is doable during the rainy season, but can become slippery and muddy by November. The trail closes for maintenance each February.

Getting Ready: Tour operators in Cusco will tell you the Inca Trail is of “moderate” difficulty, but it can be rough going, especially the first couple of days. You must be in decent shape, even if your agency supplies porters to carry your pack—current regulations limit the porter’s load to 18 kg (39.6 lb) including his own gear. Agencies will typically offer a “half-porter” with a limit of 7 kg (15.4 lb) for your personal gear. The trail is often narrow and hair-raising and can be challenging for those with a fear of heights, although most will be fine. Hiking Huayna Picchu, however, is not recommended for those with a serious fear of heights. As the mountains sometimes rise to over 13,775 feet, be wary of altitude sickness. Give yourself two or three days in Cusco or the Sacred Valley to acclimatize. There are seven well-spaced, designated campsites along the trail.

While You’re Hiking

Food: All operators have their own chefs that run ahead of you with the porters, set up camp, and create culinary feasts for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. This will probably be some of the best camp food you’ll ever have and maybe some of the best food while in Peru. We’re talking quinua porridge with blueberries, chicken soup, and gourmet pasta dishes.

Campsites: There are seven well-spaced, designated campsites along the trail.

Coca Leaves: Although after Day 2 it is a gradual descent into Machu Picchu, you’re still high enough to feel the thin air. You’ll notice porters chewing coca throughout the trek. Coca leaves are a mild stimulant as well as an appetite, pain, and hunger suppressant. You’ll only need about one bag of your own (about S/1) for the trail. To properly enjoy the leaves, take about 15 of them and pick the stems off. Stack them on top of each other and roll into a tight little bundle. Place the bundle between your gum and cheek on one side, allowing the leaves to soften up for about two minutes. Eventually start chewing to let the juice out. It’s quite a bitter taste, but you’ll feel better. All tour operators will also serve tea during snack breaks.

Bathrooms: Toilets could be a lot worse. You won’t be able to sit down, but most porcelain-lined holes in the ground do flush and there are usually working sinks to wash up. You must bring your own toilet paper wherever you go. Campsites all have toilets, but the trail itself does not. Many trail operators are now bringing along toilet tents as well.

Luggage: Check with your tour operator before you go, and pack as lightly as possible. If you hire porters, they’re probably going to be carrying a lot more than just your things on their backs. An American-style backwoods backpack is not the right piece of luggage—it weighs a lot on its own and is an awkward shape for the porters to incorporate into their massive bundles. A simple duffle bag is best and is often provided by the agency you use. You should leave the rest of your belongings with your hotel in Cusco or the Sacred Valley. Staying overnight in Ollantaytambo the night before will allow you to get a bit more sleep before the trek.

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Sight Information

Address:

Start: Km 82, Ollantaytambo, Cusco, Peru

Map It

Published 02/07/2017

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