Fodor's Expert Review Cliff House

The Richmond Restaurant–Sight
Free

Spectacular ocean views have been bringing diners to its several restaurants for more than a century—you can see 30 miles or more on a clear day. Three buildings have occupied this site—today owned by the National Park Service—since 1863, and the current building dates from 1909. Sitting on the observation deck is the Giant Camera, a camera obscura with its lens pointing skyward housed in a cute yellow-painted wooden shack. Built in the 1940s and threatened many times with demolition, it's now on the National Register of Historic Places. To the north of the Cliff House lie the ruins of the once grand glass-roof Sutro Baths. Adolph Sutro, eccentric onetime San Francisco mayor and Cliff House owner, built the bath complex in 1896, so that everyday folks could enjoy the benefits of swimming. Six enormous baths—freshwater and seawater—more than 500 dressing rooms, and several restaurants covered 3 acres north of the Cliff House and accommodated 25,000 bathers. Likened to Roman... READ MORE

Spectacular ocean views have been bringing diners to its several restaurants for more than a century—you can see 30 miles or more on a clear day. Three buildings have occupied this site—today owned by the National Park Service—since 1863, and the current building dates from 1909. Sitting on the observation deck is the Giant Camera, a camera obscura with its lens pointing skyward housed in a cute yellow-painted wooden shack. Built in the 1940s and threatened many times with demolition, it's now on the National Register of Historic Places. To the north of the Cliff House lie the ruins of the once grand glass-roof Sutro Baths. Adolph Sutro, eccentric onetime San Francisco mayor and Cliff House owner, built the bath complex in 1896, so that everyday folks could enjoy the benefits of swimming. Six enormous baths—freshwater and seawater—more than 500 dressing rooms, and several restaurants covered 3 acres north of the Cliff House and accommodated 25,000 bathers. Likened to Roman baths in a European glass palace, the baths were for decades a favorite destination of San Franciscans. The complex fell into disuse after World War II, was closed in 1952, and burned down (under questionable circumstances) during demolition in 1966.

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Restaurant–Sight Local Interest–Sight Free

Quick Facts

1090 Point Lobos Ave.
San Francisco, California  94121, USA

415-386–3330

www.cliffhouse.com

Sight Details:
Rate Includes: Free

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