Fodor's Expert Review Laodicea

Pamukkale (Hierapolis) Archaeological Site/Ruins

On a hill overlooking the white travertines of Pamukkale about 10 km (6 miles) to the north, the relatively little-visited ruins of the ancient city of Laodicea on the Lycus are perfect for an atmospheric ramble down colonnaded streets, or (with care) down the crumbling slopes of two unrestored, yet poetically lovely ancient theaters. Founded in the 3rd century BC, Laodicea passed into Pergamene, then Roman hands, and was a prosperous trading city, known for its black wool. Luxurious public buildings, including baths and a temple to an unknown divinity testify to its wealth. Roman Laodicea's relatively large Jewish population (in the thousands) likely contributed to the early adoption of Christianity in the city, and the basilica (currently under restoration) was one of the "Seven Churches of Asia" in the Book of Revelation; try to catch a glimpse of its extensive geometric mosaics. You can join a tour or catch a dolmuş from Pamukkale center. (The dolmuş drops you off... READ MORE

On a hill overlooking the white travertines of Pamukkale about 10 km (6 miles) to the north, the relatively little-visited ruins of the ancient city of Laodicea on the Lycus are perfect for an atmospheric ramble down colonnaded streets, or (with care) down the crumbling slopes of two unrestored, yet poetically lovely ancient theaters. Founded in the 3rd century BC, Laodicea passed into Pergamene, then Roman hands, and was a prosperous trading city, known for its black wool. Luxurious public buildings, including baths and a temple to an unknown divinity testify to its wealth. Roman Laodicea's relatively large Jewish population (in the thousands) likely contributed to the early adoption of Christianity in the city, and the basilica (currently under restoration) was one of the "Seven Churches of Asia" in the Book of Revelation; try to catch a glimpse of its extensive geometric mosaics. You can join a tour or catch a dolmuş from Pamukkale center. (The dolmuş drops you off on the main road about a seven-minute walk away from the archaeological site.) If heading off on your own, be sure to check with your hotel that the site is not closed for excavations.

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Archaeological Site/Ruins

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Goncali, Agri  Turkey

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