13 Best Sights in Outside Innenstadt, Munich

Museum Mensch und Natur

Nymphenburg Fodor's choice

This popular museum in the north wing of Schloss Nymphenburg has nothing to do with the Wittelsbachs but is one of the palace's major attractions. Through interactive exhibits, the Museum Mensch und Natur looks at the variety of life on Earth, the history of humankind, and our place in the environment, as well as genetics and nature conservation. Main exhibits include a huge representation of the human brain and a chunk of Alpine crystal weighing half a ton.

Schloss Nymphenburg

Nymphenburg Fodor's choice
Nymhenburg Palace, Munich, Germany
gary718 / Shutterstock

This glorious Baroque and Rococo palace, the largest in Germany, grew in size and scope over more than 200 years. Begun in 1662 by the Italian architect Agostino Barelli, it was completed by his successor, Enrico Zuccalli. It represents a tremendous high point of Italian cultural influence, in what is undoubtedly Germany's most Italian city. Within the original building, now the central axis of the palace complex, is the magnificent Steinerner Saal (Great hall), extending over two floors and richly decorated with stucco and grandiose frescoes by masters such as François Cuvilliés the Elder and Johann Baptist Zimmermann. One of the surrounding royal chambers houses Ludwig I's famous Schönheitsgalerie (Gallery of Beauties), portraits of women who caught his roving eye. The palace park is laid out in formal French style, with low hedges and gravel walks extending into woodland. Among the ancient trees are three fascinating pavilions, including the Amalienburg hunting lodge by François Cuvilliés. It's also worth visiting the former royal stables, now the Marstallmuseum, which houses a fleet of carriages, coaches, and sleighs. In its upper rooms are examples of the world-renowned Nymphenburg porcelain, the electoral porcelain factory founded by Max III Joseph in 1747.

Buy Tickets Now

Bavaria Filmstadt

Geiselgasteig

For movie buffs, Munich has its own Hollywood-like neighborhood, the Geiselgasteig, in the affluent Grünwald district, on the southern outskirts of the city. A number of notable films, such as Die Unendliche Geschichte (The Neverending Story), were made here. Visitors can peek into the submarine used in the filming of Das Boot (The Boat) and see the space station set from the recent sci-fi thriller Stowaway. Admission price includes a 90-minute guided tour and entry to the cinema, which screens a 10-minute family-friendly film complete with motion simulator and 4D effects.

Bavaria Filmpl. 7, Munich, 82031, Germany
089-6499–2000
Sight Details
Rate Includes: €20, In high season, a daily tour and film screening is offered in English at 1 pm.

Recommended Fodor's Video

BMW Museum

Milbertshofen
BMW Museum, Munich, Germany
meunierd/Shutterstock

Munich serves as the headquarters for the famous BMW car company. The circular tower of its museum in the Olympiapark is one of the defining icons of Munich's modern cityscape. It contains not only a dazzling collection of BMWs old and new but also items and exhibitions relating to the company's social history and its technical developments. 

Buy Tickets Now

BMW Plant Munich

Milbertshofen
Come see how a BMW car is made. The BMW factory live production can be toured on weekdays (minimum age to participate is seven). Registration for plant tours, which last a maximum of 2½ hours, is only possible with a reservation. The tours start and finish at the north information counter at BMW Welt. Due to plant reconstruction, there is no wheelchair access at present. Reserve at least two weeks in advance via phone or email; see the website for details.

BMW Welt

Milbertshofen
BMW Welt, Outside Innenstadt, Munich, Germany
(c) Kunertus | Dreamstime.com

Opened in 2007, the cutting-edge design of BMW Welt, with its sweeping, futuristic facade, is one structure helping to overcome the conservative image Munich has had in the realm of architecture since 1945. Even if you have just a passing interest in cars and engines, this showroom is a must—it has averaged 2 million visitors a year since its opening. In addition to tours of the building, there are readings, concerts, and exhibitions. Tours can only be booked via telephone or email.

Buy Tickets Now

BMW Welt

Milbertshofen

Opened in 2007, the cutting-edge design of BMW Welt, with its sweeping, futuristic facade, is one structure helping to overcome the conservative image Munich has had in the realm of architecture since 1945. Even if you have just a passing interest in cars and engines, this showroom is a must—it has averaged 2 million visitors a year since its opening. In addition to tours of the building, there are readings, concerts, and exhibitions. Tours are in high demand, so it's best to book ahead via telephone or email. You can also visit the BMW Plant to see how a BMW car is made. It can be toured on weekdays (minimum age to participate is six, with an adult). Registration for plant tours, which last for two hours, is only possible with a reservation. The tours start and finish at the north information counter at BMW Welt. Reserve at least two weeks in advance via phone or email; see the website for details.

Am Olympiapark 1, Munich, 80809, Germany
089-1250–16001
Sight Details
Rate Includes: BMW Welt tour €8; BMW Plant tour €18, BMW Plant closed weekends

Botanischer Garten

Nymphenburg

On the northern edge of Schloss Nymphenburg, this collection of some 19,000 plants, including orchids, cacti, cycads, alpine flowers, and rhododendrons, covers over 52 acres and makes up one of the most extensive botanical gardens in Europe. It is also used to provide a refuge for bee species, and for scientific research by local university students.

Menzingerstr. 65, Munich, 80638, Germany
089-1786–1321
Sight Details
Rate Includes: €5.50

Deutsches Museum Flugwerft Schleissheim

Connoisseurs of airplanes and flying machines will appreciate this magnificent offshoot of the Deutsches Museum, some 20 km (12 miles) north of the City Center in Oberschleissheim. These buildings, constructed in the early 20th century by the Königlich-Bayerische Fliegertruppen (Royal Bavarian Flying corps), tell the story of aviation history. It's an ideal complement to a visit to Schloss Schleissheim.

Marstallmuseum and Nymphenburger Porzellan

Nymphenburg

Nymphenburg contains so much of interest that a day hardly provides enough time. Don't leave without visiting the former royal stables, now the Marstallmuseum. It houses a fleet of vehicles, including an elaborately decorated sleigh in which King Ludwig II once glided through the Bavarian twilight, flaming torches lighting the way. Also exhibited in the Marstallmuseum's upper rooms are examples of the world-renowned Nymphenburg porcelain, the electoral porcelain factory founded by Max III Joseph in 1747. Nymphenburg porcelain has a flagship store at Odeonsplatz and is also available in numerous other shops around the city.

Neues Schloss Schleissheim

Neues Schloss, Schleissheim Palace, Munich, Germany
Scirocco340 / Shutterstock

Duke Wilhelm V found the perfect peaceful retreat outside Munich, and in 1598 built what is now known as the Altes Schloss Schleissheim (Schleissheim Old Palace). In 1685 Elector Max Emanuel added Lustheim, which houses one of Germany's most impressive collections of Meissen porcelain, and at the beginning of the 18th century the Neues Schloss Schleissheim (Schleissheim New Palace). This baroque palace's rooms display great works of art and outstanding interior decoration.

Olympiapark

Milbertshofen
Olympiapark, Outside Innenstadt, Munich, Germany
(c) Fottoo | Dreamstime.com

Built for the 1972 Olympic Games on the staggering quantities of rubble delivered from the wartime destruction of Munich, the Olympiapark was—and still is—considered an architectural and landscape wonder. The jewel in the crown is the Olympic Stadium, former home of Bayern Munich soccer team. With its truly avant-garde sweeping canopy roof, winding its way across various parts of the complex, it was an inspired design for the big events of the 1972 Olympic Games. Tragically, a bigger event relegated what was heading to be the most successful Games to date to the sidelines. It was from the adjacent accommodation area that a terrorist attack on the Israeli team began, eventually leaving 17 people dead.

Unlike many former Olympic sites around the world, today the area is heavily used; it's home to numerous concerts and sporting events, and is a haven for joggers, swimmers, and people just wishing to relax. Tours of the park are conducted on a Disneyland-style train throughout the day. For the more adventurous, how about climbing the roof of the Olympic Stadium and rappelling down or zip-lining 115 feet in the air across the stadium? For the best view of the whole city and the Alps, take the elevator up 623 feet to the viewing platform of the Olympiaturm (Olympic Tower) or try out the revolving Restaurant 181, at 181 meters (or 594 feet) above Munich. l.

Buy Tickets Now
Spiridon-Louis-Ring 21, Munich, 80809, Germany
089-3067–2414
Sight Details
Rate Includes: Stadium €3.50; Stadium tour €8, Stadium closed Mon. and Tues.

Tierpark Hellabrunn

Harlaching

On the Isar, just upstream from the city, this attractive zoo has many parklike enclosures but a minimum of cages. Founded in 1911, the zoo is slightly different from many others in that it's a self-styled nature reserve, and it follows a concept called Geo-zoo, which means care has been taken to group animals according to their natural and geographical habitats. Critics of the concept of zoos won't agree, but supporters appreciate the extra attention to detail. The huge zoo area, covering nearly 100 acres, also includes restaurants and children's areas, and some of the older buildings are in typical art nouveau style.

Buy Tickets Now