Jerusalem Restaurants

Jerusalem’s dining scene is smaller and more modest than Tel Aviv's, but is steeped in 4,000 years of culinary traditions. Among Jewish residents, more than a century of immigration has infused the local fare with the best of Kurdish, Moroccan, French, Polish, Yemenite, and Italian flavors. On the Palestinian side, most restaurants rely on a rich heritage of family cooking. On both sides, an elite class of chefs has begun combining the best of local ingredients with advanced cooking techniques and imaginative serving styles.

All this is to say that when you’re in Jerusalem you can enjoy the best of both worlds: hole-in-the-wall eateries brimming with aromatic stews and garlicky hummus or high-end dining rooms serving inspired and elegant riffs on the city’s flavors and produce.

Some cuisine designations are self-explanatory, but other terms may be confusing. A restaurant billing itself as "dairy" will serve meals without meat; many such places do serve fish, in addition to pasta, soup, and salads. "Oriental" usually means Middle Eastern (in contrast to Western), often meaning hummus, kebabs, and stews.

The term kosher doesn’t imply a particular style of cooking, only that the cooks followed Jewish dietary law in selecting and preparing the food. In Jerusalem, where there are many kosher standards from which to choose, the selection can be dizzying. But unless specific kosher standards govern your eating habits, don't worry. Jerusalem is home to dozens of kosher restaurants preparing excellent food. Remember that most kosher restaurants are closed for Friday dinner and Saturday lunch in observation of the Jewish Sabbath. A generous handful of nonkosher cafés, bars, and restaurants remain open all weekend.

Dress codes are pretty much nonexistent in Jerusalem's restaurants (as in the rest of Israel). People tend to dress casually—jeans are perfectly appropriate almost everywhere anytime. A modicum of neatness and modesty (trousers instead of jeans, a button-down shirt instead of a T-shirt) might be expected in the more exclusive establishments. In conservative neighborhoods, women will feel more comfortable covered up. If you brought the kids, you're in luck: nearly every Israeli restaurant is kid-friendly, and many have special menus and high chairs.

Sort by: 46 Recommendations {{numTotalPoiResults}} {{ (numTotalPoiResults===1)?'Recommendation':'Recommendations' }} 0 Recommendations
CLEAR ALL Area Search CLEAR ALL
Loading...
  • 1. Abu Shukri

    $ | Muslim Quarter | Middle Eastern

    In the heart of the Old City, this place has some of the best hummus in town, served fast to locals crammed around rickety tables under fluorescent...Read More

  • 2. Anna

    $$ | Center City | Italian

    This imposing 200-year-old stone building called Beit Ticho (Ticho House) was once the home of artist Anna Ticho, whose evocative drawings of...Read More

  • 3. Askadinya

    $$ | East Jerusalem | Eclectic

    At this East Jerusalem bistro, the stone walls are hung with local art and antique musical instruments. In summer, you can enjoy your meal on...Read More

  • 4. Barood

    $$$ | Center City | Middle Eastern

    Jerusalemite Daniella Lerer combines her family's Sephardic culinary traditions with modern Israeli cooking techniques and personal favorites...Read More

  • 5. Burgers Bar

    $ | Center City | Fast Food

    At this popular kosher place, the hamburgers are more like cakes than patties. They come with your choice of tasty sauces, and all are made...Read More

  • 6. Caffit

    $$ | German Colony | Café

    This German Colony institution, part of a chain, is well-known for its sweet potato soup and juicy salmon skewers. Morning meals are generous...Read More

  • 7. Cardo

    $$$ | East Jerusalem | Middle Eastern

    The terraced restaurant atop the Legacy Hotel has a beautiful view, but the real art is on the plate. Award-winning chef Johnny Goric is a judge...Read More

    View Tours and Activities
  • 8. Costa

    $ | Christian Quarter | Middle Eastern

    Steps from the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, Palestinians crowd into this tiny spot to tuck into hammam mehshi, or stuffed pigeon. It's a...Read More

  • 9. Deitsch

    $ | Center City | Polish

    Cholent is a dish that evolved from necessity: Jewish law forbids cooking on the Sabbath, and so observant Jews often start a stew on Friday...Read More

  • 10. Dolphin Yam

    $$$ | Center City | Seafood

    Hebrew for "Sea Dolphin," this lively eatery serves some of the city's best seafood. The decor is pleasant enough—pale yellow stucco walls,...Read More

  • 11. Fishenchips

    $ | Center City | British

    Shlomi Ohana's tiny fish-and-chips emporium in the heart of the vegetable market offers fresh selections direct from his father Haim's seafood...Read More

  • 12. Halitatea

    $ | Center City | Café

    This teahouse in an alley, barely visible from the street, imports dozens of organic, fair-trade specialty leaves, especially from India, Sri...Read More

  • 13. Hamarakia

    $ | Center City | Israeli

    Share a long wooden table with university students at this restaurant named for a soup pot and enjoy an ever-changing menu of hearty soups and...Read More

  • 14. Hamiznon Kitchen Station

    $$ | German Colony | Israeli

    In the former cafeteria of Jerusalem's train station, this casual eatery prints its menus on newspaper broadsheet and has maintained more than...Read More

  • 15. Hasabichiya

    $ | Center City | Israeli

    The sign is only in Hebrew at this hole-in-the-wall stand, which features what many say is the best sabich in the city. Thin slices of fried...Read More

  • 16. Hasandwich Shel Rachel

    $$ | Baka | Middle Eastern

    This Tunisian hole-in-the-wall offers pillowy hand-rolled couscous, slow-cooked stews, and zingy tuna and egg sandwiches, served outside on...Read More

  • 17. Holy Cafe

    $$ | Jewish Quarter | Israeli

    With wooden tables in the tile-floored dining room and under the trees in the nearby square, this is one of the few full-service restaurants...Read More

  • 18. Holy Rock Café

    $ | Muslim Quarter | Middle Eastern

    Between Stations VI and VII of the Via Dolorosa is the very good Holy Rock Café. The name may be a little hokey, but there's nothing wrong with...Read More

  • 19. Hummus Ben Sira

    $ | Center City | Middle Eastern

    Everyone from students to sanitation workers shares elbow space at this casual eatery's long bar inlaid with Armenian painted tiles. The hummus...Read More

  • 20. Hummus Lina

    $ | Christian Quarter | Middle Eastern

    With an upstairs dining area, Lina offers a respite from the hubbub of the Old City. Hand-ground hummus is the main event here, and you can...Read More

No Restaurants Results

Please try a broader search, or expore these popular suggestions:

There are no results for {{ strDestName}} Restaurants in the searched map area with the above filters. Please try a different area on the map, or broaden your search with these popular suggestions: